For 89 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 86% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 10% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Karen Han's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Judas and the Black Messiah
Lowest review score: 15 6 Underground
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 75 out of 89
  2. Negative: 3 out of 89
89 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Karen Han
    Snyder’s Justice League is more, more, more in a way that most films wouldn’t dare, and, after a year of no theaters at all, a movie that makes me long to return to a multiplex—to see more movies that commit so completely to a vision that it’s impossible not to be swept away.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Karen Han
    Always and Forever boasts all of the Instagram-filter-style color grading and absurdly beautiful sets that fans have come to expect, as well as a soundtrack of suitably romantic pop songs—but it’s the last bite of a meal you’re already full from. You’re used to the flavors, and there’s nothing in the dish that surprises you anymore. If comfort is your aim, look no further, but to keep any franchise or genre alive, sometimes you need some fresh ingredients.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Karen Han
    It’s not a perfect movie, nor a particularly innovative one, but the science-fiction adventure—touted as the first Korean space blockbuster—is certainly fun, with colorful performances and impressive CGI, and a worthy substitute for a new Star Wars or Marvel movie.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Karen Han
    Though it’s early in the year, it doesn’t feel like a stretch to name it one of 2021’s best films.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Karen Han
    Gorō is a talented director. The individual shots of Earwig are beautifully composed, the characters are delightful (the tiny demons who wait upon Mandrake seem destined to become merchandise hits), and the film’s flimsy plot isn’t necessarily a bad thing. But the visuals sink the entire enterprise.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Karen Han
    Supernova is modest in every respect except its emotional impact. In the characters’ internal arcs, the title—the name for a stellar explosion—comes fully into perspective.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Karen Han
    Malcolm & Marie is certainly stylish, shot entirely in black and white, with its leads in fancy clothes for a good portion of its runtime, but its aesthetic virtues are suffocated by all of its screenwriter’s hot air.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Karen Han
    Thoughtfully directed, vividly written, and beautifully acted, it’s a hopeful film, universally appealing despite—or perhaps because of—just how very Korean American it is.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 56 Karen Han
    Though the central idea is fun, everything that’s been built around it feels rote, if not totally outdated.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 66 Karen Han
    If anything, this version could have benefited from being weirder. Given that weird is territory Zemeckis seems to specialize in, The Witches’ relatively tame nature is a letdown.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Karen Han
    The charisma that was fully on display in Goggins’ previous work is firing on all cylinders in John Bronco — the role demands grins, winks, and whoops, and Goggins is a master at them all.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 84 Karen Han
    The film seesaws between being a persuasive argument for standing up for what’s right and simply being an actor’s showcase.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Karen Han
    The entire 104-minute show is performed in a single “room,” so it comes down to the sheer strength of Schreck’s writing and performance to hold an audience’s attention. Schreck more than pulls it off.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Karen Han
    It’s what James and Thomas bring to the table that makes this new adaptation of Rebecca worth watching.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Karen Han
    It’s a delight no matter how you slice it; for fans, it’s a reminder of what makes Almodóvar such a great director, and for neophytes, it’s an unforgettable introduction.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 95 Karen Han
    Dick Johnson Is Dead is the best reminder possible to cherish your loved ones while they’re still living — to take that extra photo or video as something to hang onto once they’re gone.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Karen Han
    The film is, in the end, Hawkins’ to own. Her eyes — and her posture, her voice, her jittery movements — defy any show-stealing, and lend a solidity to a film that might be a little flimsy otherwise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 69 Karen Han
    The humor being volleyed around in Hubie Halloween isn’t malicious; Sandler, as Hubie, is almost always the butt of the joke, and the gags are mostly gross-outs rather than jabs at any specific people. Hubie Halloween may not be Uncut Gems, but it excels at being what it is: a comedy that’s easy to watch, and easy to forget about.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Karen Han
    The match of material and star works so well that the story’s relative simplicity and undercooked quality aren’t too much of a stumbling block. It’s a perfect next step for Brown, and hopefully a sign of greater things to come.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 93 Karen Han
    Night of the Kings occasionally strays too far into fantasy (and CGI), even though the more grounded scenes are what truly make the film sing. Still, it’s a stunning work. Lacôte’s tribute to the power of stories is a powerful story in and of itself, celebrating oral traditions and the rituals we create for ourselves in order to make life just a little more bearable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 95 Karen Han
    Vinterberg’s ending offers an unlikely sense of catharsis, even though it isn’t truly happy, turning the film into something fresh and affecting. On top of all that, the film provides the opportunity to watch Mikkelsen give perhaps his best performance yet.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 97 Karen Han
    Every aspect of Wolfwalkers is thoughtfully, beautifully rendered, and the story is full of twists that keep things unpredictable until the finale. It’s one of the most impressive films of the year, and the best animated film of 2020 thus far.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 98 Karen Han
    American Utopia will last past the current moment, past the pandemic, but in the cultural context of its upcoming release, it feels both like an electric current and a balm.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 98 Karen Han
    The journey Zhao has crafted is marvelous, exploring literal peaks and valleys as well as emotional ones.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 68 Karen Han
    The film is easy on the eyes, and its cast is strong, but that doesn’t make up for a thin story. The action keeps moving by necessity, given how many characters are in play, but stop to inspect the proceedings, and it becomes clear that that movement isn’t based on much.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Karen Han
    The maze Kaufman is leading us through is a mystery, as he never pulls back far enough to show us the whole thing. But as itchy and claustrophobic as the paths are, they ultimately lead to a sense of hope.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Karen Han
    Mulan handily clears the bar set by live-action duds like The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast, but it still fails to recapture the magic of the movie it’s adapting. It forgoes the strongest ideas in the animated film (the songs and the humble origins of heroism) in order to try to tell a more conventional story.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 68 Karen Han
    It’s the rare teen movie that doesn’t seem like it’s mostly a fantasy, that gets beyond the big, artificial beats of series like Glee and Riverdale.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 72 Karen Han
    Like its predecessors, Bill & Ted Face the Music is ultimately just friendly fluff, but Winter and Reeves are charming together, and the need for Bill and Ted to grow up a little helps give the film a backbone.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Karen Han
    The film’s experimental nature makes it tougher to swallow than a conventional biopic, but also more interesting and rewarding to engage with. Great performances help keep the whole enterprise anchored — Hawke and MacLachlan are wonderful as men caught in conflict with each other — and the anachronisms provide food for thought long after the film has ended.

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