Liz Shannon Miller

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For 130 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 83% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 13% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 14 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liz Shannon Miller's Scores

Average review score: 82
Highest review score: 100 The Handmaid's Tale: Season 1
Lowest review score: 25 The Orville: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 130
130 tv reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Liz Shannon Miller
    ithin the first few minutes of the pilot episode, “The Boys” delivers on blood, vomit, and swears, and there are more graphic visuals over the course of the first hour, as the series depicts its heroes’ various superpowers with a gritty realness. ... While superhero stories typically offer up an escape, “The Boys” is decidedly disinterested in such matters, and its corporate parody proves the most stinging.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 83 Liz Shannon Miller
    That quest for the extreme can sometimes feel like a distraction from the attempts at real emotional storytelling, but when it all comes together, it’s a whole lot of fun.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    There’s room for optimism, because there are plenty of stories to be told, and given time, this cast may grow into them. It’s a low-key sort of fantasy, the idea of one-time strangers becoming a found family in an urban jungle. But fantasy stories have a way of feeding the soul.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    The Good Fight is worth discovering for yourself on its own merits, and it’s a lot easier to recommend it now. Sometimes, there’s something to be said for quality and quantity.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    Ultimately, this is a show about the making of entertainment, and the producers do a brilliant job highlighting the individual struggles the process entails, as well as how the people who devote their lives to it are affected.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    The series proves itself to have a sophistication of storytelling on a level that many traditional sitcoms can only aspire to.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Liz Shannon Miller
    What makes this season of “The Punisher” work so well is that it feels less like a Season 2 and more like a Season 5, a standalone story in the established adventures of Frank Castle.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    There’s a lot of set-up packed into this premiere, and for now the direction set is worth traveling.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    This approbation [moving to Sunday-nights after Crashing] only confirms what fans have known since its Vimeo days: High Maintenance is a brilliant show, even when its risks don’t highlight the show’s strengths.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    One of the best things about this show is the fact that so many of these characters do feel like kids--not hyper-articulate young adults, but scrambling teenagers who don’t really know how they feel about anything--they just know they feel it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Liz Shannon Miller
    [Executive producer dream] hampton keeps things simple, to the point of starkness, but that matter-of-fact approach makes “Surviving R. Kelly” all the more heartbreaking. The series relies largely on talking-head interviews, with many participants shot against a plain black background. It’s not the most innovative format, but it ensures we never lose focus on what’s being said. ... It is brutal viewing. But it’s so good to know it exists.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    If Brooker had taken a more literal approach to the idea of doing an interactive narrative, it might have proven dull. Instead, he took this as an opportunity to tell a story about how difficult telling stories like these are, really leaning into the meta opportunities provided by that approach while also indulging in some undergrad-level philosophical musings about the nature of free will. It’s a blend that works better than one might think, veering from comedy to pathos to horror with relative ease.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    It’s really Luna and Peña’s show, and even though they very rarely share the screen together, the pairing makes for a dynamic one. ... The actors do what they can with the tropes they’re handed, but Narcos is not the show to watch if you’re looking for female characters with any real agency.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    Balfe and Heughan have been playing these characters for so long that their chemistry now feels as natural as breathing, and the show knows how to lay in just the right amount of tenderness without things getting overly sappy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Liz Shannon Miller
    Season 3 ends with plenty of reason to be intrigued by a potential Season 4, from the restoration of Matt, Foggy, and Karen’s partnership to the looming threat of Bullseye in full villain form. The show may never have the spark it did in its earliest days, but it did help elevate the way stories of superheroes can be told on television. There’s still progress to be made, but Daredevil”feels like it’s on the right track.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Liz Shannon Miller
    In Season 3 there are moments of joy, moments of hope, but in the long run it’s a show about unchecked hatred that doesn’t offer much in the way of solutions, because maybe it knows there aren’t any. It doesn’t destroy the idea that action is ineffective. It even offers its characters some moments of triumph. But it also doesn’t pretend that the path to rebellion is easy, and that average people are able to find it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    It’s all anchored by these well-defined characters played by true veterans of the genre, who bring an ease to their scenes while also maintaining the original show’s energy. ... Easily the best aspect of Murphy Brown is how it acknowledges the meta elements of its existence without sacrificing the quality of its comedy or breaking the fourth wall.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Liz Shannon Miller
    There are a number of really interesting ideas to be uncovered in Manifest.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Liz Shannon Miller
    The writing is elegant and spare, the direction (with episodes helmed by Yang, Janicza Bravo, and Miguel Arteta) deft and subtle. Whether you pace out the episodes or binge in one sitting, there’s much to appreciate.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    Invoking the best qualities of David Fincher’s “Gone Girl” and Mary Harron’s adaptation of “American Psycho.” ... While we’re thoroughly embedded in Joe’s point of view from the beginning, the writing and Badgley’s performance do just enough to ensure that it’s not a comfortable experience, even as we get to know him more and more.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Liz Shannon Miller
    As extraordinary as the voice cast might be, it’s the quality of the storytelling which keeps our fascination. Even in the episodes which revel in delightful full-fledged farce, there is such depth of feeling to BoJack, such investment in its message. But the show’s beating heart also still somehow manages to stay engaged with its big ideas.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    Poehler and Offerman’s off-screen friendship translates to a wonderful on-screen dynamic that lends itself well to the sort of off-the-cuff riffing that speaks to both a deep bond and strong improvisational skills. As hosts, they bring an irreverence that keeps the tone light, positive, and natural.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    While Season 6 never attained the operatic heights of years past, it was a relatively solid advancement of this story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 67 Liz Shannon Miller
    The final moments of UnREAL bring with them an over-the-top, operatic feel, one that pushes every strain of believability but, in the grand scheme of things, feels pretty fitting. It’s a farewell that brings with it the satisfaction of slapping your toxic ex in the face, a knowledge that sometimes it’s not just enough for things to end. Sometimes, you just gotta burn it all down.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Liz Shannon Miller
    How have things changed in Season 4? The answer is simple: just more, but better, deeper, and more daring.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Liz Shannon Miller
    There’s a light touch to the material, but a deceptive one, as the wit of the script and charm of the performances mask the real pain and trauma within lives ruined by deception and bigotry.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    The show is, to be clear, worth admiring for the way it deeply cares about its ensemble and their journeys--Misty (Simone Missick) in particular is well-served with plenty to do. But that’s where most of the bloat lies: long scenes, with pretty quick emotional conclusions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    Like most other Marvel shows these connections are likely to be only surface-level for the foreseeable future, but it still speaks to the tricky balancing act all these shows have to achieve: exist in their own universe, yet walk their own path. Cloak and Dagger hasn’t escaped the problems that plague its brethren, but it has introduced some fresh components that make the latter feel like a real possibility.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Liz Shannon Miller
    Kimmy Schmidt does take one of its boldest narrative swings yet with Season 4, a format-breaking homage to the insane popularity of true crime narratives that lacks the breadth and depth of other parody series like “American Vandal,” but still nails down its own spin, while also using the concept to add new insight into the characters.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Liz Shannon Miller
    13 Reasons Why features no shortage of missteps. But it’s a show that so deeply feels for its characters, so deeply feels these scenarios, that it’s hard to be mad at it.

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