For 300 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Feeney's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Hermia & Helena
Lowest review score: 12 The Inbetweeners Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 33 out of 300
300 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Among the virtues of Bergman Island is how uncluttered it is generally, as well as its consistent quietude and Hansen-Løve’s keenness of observation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The best thing about The Last Duel is its very handsome look, courtesy of Scott’s go-to cinematographer, Dariusz Wolski.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    What makes a rock band worth attending to a half century after its breakup isn’t its personalities or backstory or context, interesting as those can be, and here they’re all highly interesting. It’s the music.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    With this fifth and final go-round, it’s clear who the best Bond is. It’s Craig, Daniel Craig.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    Andy Serkis directed. Serkis, who’s given so many memorable acting performances (Gollum! Caesar the chimpanzee!), doesn’t elicit any here. The great cinematographer Robert Richardson shot the movie, which makes its lack of visual texture all the more dispiriting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Titane is deeply unpleasant, and its narrative borders on the inexplicable — not just the sex and pregnancy — but Ducournau knows what’s she’s doing, even if the audience doesn’t know why she’s doing it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The Guilty gets less and less plausible, not least of all in how neatly it ties together various plot elements. For its first 40 minutes or so, the movie shows how much Gyllenhaal and Fuqua can do with little. Confinement becomes a dramatic launching pad. Then melodrama kicks in, and what had been a gripping offbeat thriller becomes a morality tale (including a truly shameless plot twist).
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    When the film keeps things simple, it’s at its best: uncluttered and assured.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Old Clint is still Clint, but he definitely looks a little stooped and more than a little frail. There’s an unexpected benefit to that frailty, and it makes this leisurely, not especially plausible film worth watching.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    It treats the Bakkers as something between grotesques and simpletons, which does rather limit the biopic angle. Satirizing televangelism is such low-hanging fruit it’s windfall. As for camp, it’s hard to avoid in a movie with Tammy Faye as its title character.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The constant sense of low-grade menace that helps make the first quarter of The Card Counter intriguing and effective gets put on hold, in a good way, whenever Haddish is on screen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Overall the movie has too many dead spots. And they aren’t necessarily the non-action sequences.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    This is not the most promising dramatic material — legal and actuarial material, yes, dramatic, no. Yet Worth manages to combine process and emotion in a way that works.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Poitras includes screenshots, Zoom sessions, surveillance footage, even voice mails. The overall effect is both hypnotic and deeply unsettling, like watching a real-life William Gibson novel.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Acute and skillfully made, Candyman is also pointedly political.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Visually as well as emotionally, there’s more energy here than in some action movies.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Really, The Lost Leonardo is a detective story. Like any good detective story, it’s also a morality tale. Or maybe immorality tale better describes these goings on.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    Well, even on automatic pilot, as he is here, Jackson is always good company. Maggie Q’s blend of grace and gravity translates into a quiet authority. Keaton completes the trio. He’s quite droll here. No one’s better at playing a low-key wiseass. The pleasure of such company isn’t enough to compensate for watching a succession of scenes that are like recruitment ads for abattoir work.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Writer-director Lisa Joy doesn’t lack for ideas. It’s just that there are too many and few of them original.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Ruby is an underdog worth rooting for, and Jones (the Netflix series Locke & Key) is terrific. She’s like a cross between the young Winona Ryder and the young Kate Winslet. The comparison flatters all three.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Sometimes Free Guy expands on its predecessors, just as often it doesn’t. In such an uninspired movie summer, derivativeness may not be as much of a problem, and the movie does have its moments.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The turbulence of the life and the wondrousness of the talent are an irresistible combination. Striking a balance between the two isn’t easy, but at its conclusion Respect finds a way to bring together woman and artist in a way that does justice to both.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    The addition of Gunn, like the addition of a definite article to the title, means more of the same: a baroquely nasty, flauntingly mean two-plus hours of superhero action that is also (a much greater sin) noisily tedious.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Last year’s biggest animated feature was Pixar’s Soul. The best thing about it was a rare feeling for music, an ability to express jazz visually and rhythmically. At times, Vivo does the same even better for Latin music.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Maybe the most inexplicable thing among the movie’s many inexplicabilities is the near-complete waste it makes of an actress as gifted as Cotillard.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    With Johnson’s arrival, “Jungle Cruise” enters “Raiders of the Lost Ark” territory. It’s not just the cascading action adventure in an exotic setting. It’s also James Howard Newton’s score sounding so much like John Williams that Williams should get royalties.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Most of the movie feels like an interlude. Pacing, velocity, and flow don’t interest Lowery. He knows the effects he wants and, skilled as he is, knows how to get them. But are they worth getting? A film that’s consciously laborious is still laborious. In a world where nothing is more real than magic, its absence is sorely felt.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The quality of the acting makes it easy to overlook how increasingly leaden Stillwater becomes — but not easy enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The movie’s heart is completely in the right place, which, frankly, can make it a bit of a chore to watch. Moral righteousness makes the world a better place, but filmic it’s not.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The best thing in the movie is Pratt. Firmly established in not one but two franchises — Guardians of the Galaxy and the Jurassic Park reboot — he’s come a long way from Parks and Recreation. He alternates here between charming wise guy and sensitive family man: Peter Quill domesticated.

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