For 439 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Feeney's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Man with a Movie Camera
Lowest review score: 12 The Inbetweeners Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 43 out of 439
439 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    GdTP starts out pretty slow and doesn’t speed up for far too long — it’s the rare movie that might accurately be described as more imaginative than good — but the occasional bit of inspiration like the tree-branch proboscis encourages the viewer to hang on. It’s a nose job like no other.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Black Enough is smart, lively, and sprawling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Enola doesn’t just break the fourth wall. She tickles it, winks at it, and tugs at its sleeve. With another actress, this would be annoying. With Brown, it’s charming.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Jenkins has given the documentary a structure that’s largely chronological but primarily thematic. The shifting around makes for a nice flow. The film moves along crisply without ever feeling hectic or rushed.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Banshees is like a short story trying to be a novel. The extra pages get filled with the postcard views. There are bits of wit — again, this is Martin McDonagh we’re talking about — but overall “Banshees” is lugubrious and slow.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The Good Nurse is at its best as a medical police procedural. It helps that Noah Emmerich and Nnamdi Asomugha, playing the cops, give solid, understated performances.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    This one has a tang and texture and rare sense of everyday epiphany. Just when you think you’ve got it figured out, you find out you’ve figured wrong.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Till avoids all flash. That makes it a bit didactic at times, but didacticism is a form of commitment: not so much political, though there’s certainly that, but also to emotional truth and simple human decency.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    All kinds of stuff happens. Much of it is loud, confusing, and badly paced. From a superhero-movie perspective, it’s the last one of those three that’s most problematic. Leaden and flaccid are a bad combination.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Ticket is automatic-pilot smooth and formulaic familiar. It’s a romantic comedy, yes, and a star vehicle. But the category it most belongs to is airline movie — as in, a pleasure to watch in flight but less so on the ground.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Decision has real velocity without in any way feeling hectic or rushed.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    School is endlessly talky, with dialogue that has the consistency of melted licorice (red or black, your choice). The one thing to be said for Theodore Shapiro’s muscularly egregious score is that the music makes it marginally easier to miss what the characters are saying.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    TÁR is ambitious, unusual, forceful, and ultimately frustrating, an emotional epic that’s also a nose-against-the-glass view of classical music and unconventional take on the #MeToo movement in that world.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Stars at Noon trades too much on a tradition of older, maybe not better but certainly more urgent movies. Somewhere deep, deep in its heart is the memory of Jane Greer and Robert Mitchum.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    Precise, expert execution can’t compensate for forced situations and an unenforced imaginative rigor. It’s not so much that all the characters are so unsympathetic. It’s that they’re all so uninteresting. Caricature without gusto is shrink wrap covering . . . shrink wrap.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 88 Mark Feeney
    It’s been seven years since the writer-director David O. Russell’s last movie. At its frequent best, “Amsterdam” makes it worth the wait.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Mark Feeney
    Perhaps the biggest problem with Beer Run is tonal haphazardness. Sometimes it’s meant to be funny — other times serious — other times even solemn. (Alternate title: “Chickie Learns About the Horrors of War.”) The few jokes that are clearly intentional tend to fall flat.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Thanks to its two leads, The Good House very much succeeds as character study. As narrative, it doesn’t fare anywhere near as well.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    A lot of skill and imagination went into making Blonde. It’s just that they’re misplaced. The movie has its own cracked integrity. That long runtime allows Dominik to give it a slow, inexorable rhythm. Everything has a slightly underwater quality. Stardom here has more to do with miasma than glamour.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Ramsey is close to a force of nature, equally skilled at conveying Birdy’s curiosity, humor, orneriness, and not-infrequent bewilderment. In other words, she’s a 14-year-old.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Combining as it does great admiration with an acknowledgment of flaws, “Sidney” is like Ethan Hawke’s recent HBO Max documentary about Joanne Woodward and Paul Newman, “The Last Movie Stars.”
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Darling never quite ignites. The closest it gets to ignition is Pugh’s performance. Styles is perfectly fine, but it’s her movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    That’s the ultimate dividedness of “The Silent Twins.” What feels most fresh and true in it is, literally, imaginary, June and Jennifer’s flights of fancy. What feels most leaden and movie-phony is based on fact.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Whenever Ronan’s not on the screen, “See” seems to lose something. It’s no mystery why.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    Morgen’s immersive, sometimes convulsive, visual approach justifies the format. This is filmmaking that’s anything but chaste. Intentionally overwhelming, “Moonage Daydream” is indulgent and overproduced — which suits its subject.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Watching “Story,” one realizes that so much of what most of us most love about the movies isn’t the medium, per se, but its appurtenances: stardom and glamour and the pull of narrative. What Cousins loves is the medium. We love the effects. He loves the cause.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    The remake is poky and overstuffed. It’s also 17 minutes longer than the 1940 original. Granted, eight minutes of that is closing credits, but still. Pinocchio’s nose isn’t all that’s wooden and too long here.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Feeney
    Eva Vitija’s documentary is lean and lucid and even at 84 minutes never feels hurried.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Feeney
    Formally, mockumentary is something of a cliché, as is intercutting of news coverage. That’s not great. It’s worse when the clichés aren’t just stylistic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Mark Feeney
    The documentary doesn’t give the sense of McEnroe as a person that Douglas’s film does. But it gives a rather astonishing sense of him as a player. With all due respect to those other McEnroe guises, that’s the one that matters.

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