Mike D'Angelo

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For 781 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Wages of Fear (1953)
Lowest review score: 0 11 Minutes
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 53 out of 781
781 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Either one of these dual narratives might have worked reasonably well on its own, even if Reem’s situation—complete innocent seeks to escape grave danger—is inherently more gripping than Huda’s. Leaping back and forth between them undermines the former’s urgency while underlining the latter’s single-spare-room theatricality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Like text that’s been translated into another language and then re-translated back by someone else, Uncharted bears a clunky resemblance to any number of classic action-adventure movies.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    When this film is over, viewers with voice-activated smart TVs are liable to look around for the long-dormant physical remote.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 33 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s more or less a mashup of Emmerich’s two wheelhouses: alien contact (Stargate, Independence Day) and cataclysmic disasters (The Day After Tomorrow, 2012), with some Armageddon thrown in for good measure. You will actually hear your brain cells commit seppuku as you watch it.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s something uniquely intense about hearing an entire audience remain utterly still during a movie’s transporting final minutes, afraid to cough or squeak their seat’s rusty springs or even breathe too loud, for fear of breaking the spell. Memoria inspires that kind of rapture. Experience its full dynamic range.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    A musical with numbers written by The National was a terrific idea, and so was Dinklage as Cyrano. Just not at the same time.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    What’s certain is that a stronger, more searching exploration of this scenario—one not so starkly conceived in terms of victims and villains—would have gone a long way toward alleviating potential misgivings. Wolf is so thin that one can’t help but look right through it.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    The whole thing comes across as a movie star’s anti-vanity project, just an opportunity for Bullock to demonstrate her ostensible range. Okay, she can be hard and stoic and affectless. Noted.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Mills’ core insight remains the same in every film: We’re all screwed up to some degree, all constantly improvising, all doing the best we can with relatively few guidelines. That’s not especially innovative or profound, perhaps, but seeing it refracted through a connection that movies tend to ignore lends it a certain sparkle.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    Moss spends the better part of a year just trying to get his subject to betray some raw emotion, even going so far as to have Chasten pose interview questions at one point. It’s not as if Buttigieg stonewalls the camera, either. He’s just not, at heart, a very demonstrative guy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Finch’s main problem is its amiable, low-key vibe, which feels at odds with such a grim scenario.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    The more Electrical Life conforms to what one would expect of a Louis Wain biography, the less idiosyncratically compelling it becomes. An entirely fictional story loosely inspired by the man and his wife, but beholden to nothing, might have been genuinely electrifying.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Why the murderer feels compelled to don a 3-D printed mask of each victim’s own face isn’t entirely clear—nothing about, say, recording a repugnant podcast episode merits symbolic self-inflicted harm—but, hey, it’s a novel gimmick.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    What keeps Ghostland from flatlining is Sono’s gift for delirious spectacle, along with the movie’s tacit acknowledgment that it’s utterly ridiculous.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    This is a movie, not a book or feature article. And having a subject who largely refuses to cooperate, thereby forcing the filmmakers to sit around at home and relate much of what happens indirectly, doesn’t exactly make for a classic.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    There are no outright disasters and two superlative shorts, one of which may well turn out to be this year’s single greatest cinematic achievement. Even if the rest are mostly forgettable, that batting average still qualifies as success in this notoriously erratic mini-genre.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    That Radwanski so expertly navigates the fraught subject of mental illness, avoiding most pitfalls, makes it at once harder to understand and easier to forgive the lack of subtlety in Anne At 13,000 Feet’s titular controlling metaphor.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Sealey, whose formal touch often flirts with cliché (lots of circling around Hagmaier and Bundy, with one man’s face temporarily obscured by the back of the other’s head), pointedly reminds us of Bundy’s many victims, even though none of them are shown.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Thankfully, Flag Day isn’t another disaster, though neither is it anywhere near the vicinity of Penn’s best work.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    The film’s tension between sincerity and falsity is nonstop palpable; virtually every scene threatens to collapse and implode due to the gravitational weight of its heightened reality. The correct answer to any such mighty swing for the fences is: Yes, you may start.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Over time, its perspective subtly mutates, even as its methodology remains exactly the same.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    If you seek something that coalesces in a satisfying way, this ain’t the auteur for you. If you long to be caught off guard, take a seat.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Mike D'Angelo
    Pig
    Like the animal itself, Pig is considerably smarter and more ardent than it appears at first glance, and unearths treasures that are barely evident on the surface level. We’d have settled for much less, but what a rare treat to be offered a great deal more.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Movies routinely place characters in desperate, life-or-death situations, but rarely do we see them behave in a genuinely desperate way. No Sudden Move, a period crime drama written by Ed Solomon and directed by Steven Soderbergh, corrects this oversight in a way that’s at once hilarious and distressing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Even at its dumbest, The Ice Road holds your attention; a climactic fight/chase scene even acknowledges that it’s hard to look badass on a slippery surface.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    12 Mighty Orphans tells the true story of a Depression-era high school football team improbably formed at a Texas orphanage, but the screenplay may as well have been invented from whole cloth, given its relentlessly formulaic nature.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    Awake becomes the saga of a mom’s redemption. Rodriguez works hard to make this personal angle compelling, exhibiting mama-bear ferocity, but the film’s ultra-bleak premise doesn’t cooperate.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    What’s atypically clumsy here is Petzold’s effort to synthesize big ideas: Not only is the architectural metaphor overstated and the mythological element frustratingly vague, but the two have nothing much to do with each other, making Undine play like a bidding war between high concepts—one of them academic, the other genre-inflected.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Ultimately, a movie like this succeeds or fails largely on the strength of its lead actors, and Machoian cast his well.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 33 Mike D'Angelo
    A deadly combination of enfeebled comedy and maudlin melodrama.

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