Mike D'Angelo

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For 754 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mike D'Angelo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Sicario
Lowest review score: 0 11 Minutes
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 52 out of 754
754 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    12 Mighty Orphans tells the true story of a Depression-era high school football team improbably formed at a Texas orphanage, but the screenplay may as well have been invented from whole cloth, given its relentlessly formulaic nature.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    Awake becomes the saga of a mom’s redemption. Rodriguez works hard to make this personal angle compelling, exhibiting mama-bear ferocity, but the film’s ultra-bleak premise doesn’t cooperate.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    What’s atypically clumsy here is Petzold’s effort to synthesize big ideas: Not only is the architectural metaphor overstated and the mythological element frustratingly vague, but the two have nothing much to do with each other, making Undine play like a bidding war between high concepts—one of them academic, the other genre-inflected.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Ultimately, a movie like this succeeds or fails largely on the strength of its lead actors, and Machoian cast his well.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 33 Mike D'Angelo
    A deadly combination of enfeebled comedy and maudlin melodrama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Hákonarson alternates between crowd-pleasing defiance . . . and a downbeat assessment of how much change is realistically possible, never fully committing to either mode. The result feels less complex than just wishy-washy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    The film is strongest when simply exploring the terrible notion of triage among the healthy, with everyone involved fully aware of which individual will be deemed the most expendable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    The movie’s period spookiness and its #MeToo outrage have virtually nothing to do with each other, diminishing the efficacy of both and making it feel like a tract.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    As Trey Parker and Matt Stone have taught us, you need a montage, and The Courier serves up several expert ones, leaning hard on shots of Penkovsky snapping photos of documents in shadowy storage rooms. Cooke also has a terrific camera sense in general, and can create a mood just by abruptly shifting angles.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Like a Saturday Night Live sketch that airs in the show’s final 10 minutes, Quentin Dupieux’s Keep An Eye Out tosses around ridiculous comic ideas as if secure in the knowledge that few people will ever see them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    Jacobs manages this controlled chaos with a dexterity and brittle artificiality that’s quite distinct from all of his previous films
    • 62 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Western Australia’s sunny, arid expanse makes Colin and Les’ endless, pointless rivalry seem small and petty, rather than deeply rooted in the landscape itself.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Because Watts is a gifted actor, Penguin Bloom does sometimes convey paraplegia’s emotional trials.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    Eventually, Preparations has to stop preparing and deliver some sort of answer to its central mystery, even if that turns out to be one of those maddening or exhilarating (according to taste and/or how skillfully it’s handled) shoulder shrugs. Sadly, the reveal here is quite banal, which retroactively makes the film as a whole play like a prolonged, unsatisfying tease.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Mackie’s performance, for better and worse, is anything but robotic. He plays more or less the same charismatic wiseacre he usually does, interpreting Leo as a machine that’s every bit as uniquely expressive as is any human being. That injects some welcome levity into what’s generally a flat, dour adventure, directed by Sweden’s Mikael Håfström with little of the old-school verve that he brought to Escape Plan.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Steven Soderbergh’s latest film boasts the relaxed, improvisational vibe of a temporary diversion—the sort of thing one might cook up to help pass the time during an extended voyage.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    The overall impression 76 Days delivers is that of dedicated professionals coping with an unprecedented onslaught of emergencies to the best of their ability, grimly waiting for the curve to flatten.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s no reason why this couldn’t have been good hokey pseudo-historical fun along the lines of, say, The Imitation Game. (Let’s just ignore that some folks perceived that film as Oscar-worthy.) All it required was putting the exceptional character front and center throughout, rather than shrouding his gift in pointlessly vague mystery.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    If it’s strictly information that you want, that’s what the Discovery Channel is for. The pleasures of a Herzog doc are unique to him.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 33 Mike D'Angelo
    Director and cowriter André Øvredal (Trollhunter, The Autopsy Of Jane Doe) gets credit here for “original story,” but every single element has been borrowed, and precious little else of note about Mortal remains.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s giving ordinary citizens the floor that makes the difference, and City Hall truly comes alive when Wiseman’s out on the street.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 42 Mike D'Angelo
    Give Love And Monsters credit: If nothing else, it does at least come up with a new (albeit ludicrous) twist on the killer-asteroid premise that once fueled two dumb disaster movies in the same year.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    There’s a pleasing kernel of genuine warmth glowing at the heart of this movie, but it’s been heavily insulated—almost buried—by juvenile silliness. One could argue that this merely echoes the family dynamic, but your tolerance for buffoonery will still need to be quite high.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Mike D'Angelo
    Save Yourselves! didn’t have the budget to pull off its ambitiously bizarre and essentially unresolved ending (which might not have been satisfying even had it been fully realized—it’s really way out there, quite literally), but it gets the small things just right, and that’s far more important.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Mike D'Angelo
    The Nest’s true star is that cavernous 15th-century mansion, which provides Durkin and Erdély with endless opportunities to carve out sinister voids that threaten to swallow this nuclear family whole.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mike D'Angelo
    Every so often, Egoyan takes another stab at the offbeat, achronological, weirdly intimate mode in which he originally specialized, but the spark never quite fully ignites. Guest Of Honour, his latest effort, is decidedly that sort of low-wattage Egoyan classic, serving up familiar preoccupations and structural curlicues—minus any inspiration.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Mike D'Angelo
    It’s good to see Kore-eda try to stretch himself a little, and The Truth demonstrates that his talent can survive on foreign soil. But there’s not as much powerful emotional veracity to it as one might hope.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Mike D'Angelo
    Deriving endless anxiety from brawny men moving as gingerly as possible, it’s a riveting anti-action movie, one of the most memorable high-concept pictures ever made in Europe.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Viewers who cherish ambiguity will have no trouble finding plenty of it here, as Hong never explicitly tips his hand regarding this woman’s disputed identity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Mike D'Angelo
    Twists and turns shape the narrative, but not always to Ree’s benefit; he responds by scrambling his film’s chronology in ways that threaten to rupture any sense of trust between director and viewer. Questions that one might ordinarily have dismissed instead take hold and fester. Just how real is any of this?

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