Owen Gleiberman

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For 3,218 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Owen Gleiberman's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 WALL-E
Lowest review score: 0 Nothing But Trouble
Score distribution:
3218 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Slipshod rather than sly. There's no fury to the movie, repressed or otherwise, which may be why when the Revolution arrives, it has all the impact of a guillotine with a deadly dull blade.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Going Shopping is sharp and funny about all the things that shopping can mean to the women who live to do it, and even to those who don't.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Down to the Bone achieves what only the best independent films have: making life, at its most unvarnished, a journey.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    By the time Hard Target reaches its amazing climax, set in a warehouse stocked with surreal Mardi Gras floats, the film has become an incendiary action orgy, as joyously excessive as the grand finale in a fireworks show. Woo puts the thrill back into getting blown away.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Does all it can not to dehumanize Chong.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 16 Owen Gleiberman
    Graffiti Bridge is a sad fiasco — and except for Shake! the music (at least to my ears) is Prince at his most joyless, a collection of glorified rhythm tracks. For the first time, the revolutionary funkster seems to be preaching to a world that has left him behind.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    A buoyant, funny, and disarmingly humane comedy of beautiful losers in revolt.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Stealth, a dregs-of-summer knockoff, is too ponderous and inept to serve a comparable function now, yet the film's lack of thrust may be related to an absence of conviction about its own war-is-a-videogame clichés.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It hardly helps, of course, to have no characters to root for. What is it about Pierce Brosnan? He's got dimples, grace, charm; he's not a movie star, exactly -- he looks as if he should be hosting something.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The actors are terrific, especially Weaving, who plays bottoming out as a tragedy spiked with gallows humor, and Blanchett, who digs deep into the booby-trapped nature of recovery. The revelation, however, is Rowan Woods, a major filmmaker in the making.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    To explain a serial killer is to diminish his madness, but Dahmer does something quietly riveting. It lets you brush up against the humanity of a psycho, without making him any less psycho.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is consistently fun, and Tucker's comeuppance ? will leave you gasping (if not gagging) with laughter.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Starts high, gradually bogs down, then dies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Nimble, engrossing, and journalistically eye-opening, a movie that pulls into focus 30 years of porn in America. It also pulls no punches.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Gibson, in a disarmingly nimble, fast break performance, makes Nick's new hyperempathy look like the essence of virile panache.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Jumanji is cardboard Spielberg, a B-movie scrap heap of spare parts lifted from "Jurassic Park" and "Gremlins" and "Back to the Future".
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Stone takes his characters right over the top, rubbing our noses in our own lust for excess, and some viewers are bound to say that he's gone too far. Yet this may be one case where too far is just far enough-where a gifted filmmaker has transformed his own attraction to violence into an art of depraved catharsis.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    For all its music-trivia affection, High Fidelity is finally a pretty thin melody.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 33 Owen Gleiberman
    He now imparts so many life lessons via his Rube Goldberg thresher devices that he's starting to turn into the Rod Serling of severed body parts. Now that's torture.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As the jabbering psychotic Jeffrey Goines, Brad Pitt has a rabid, get-a-load-of-me deviousness that works for the film's central mystery: We can't tell where the fanatic leaves off and the put-on artist begins.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    A bad movie so over-the-top that at moments it's almost good - or, at least, more arresting than it has any right to be.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Director John Maybury has a feel for shock rhythms, and he's skillful at keeping you guessing, but after a while you want your questions to cohere into compelling answers, and in The Jacket they don't, quite.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Pungent, funny, and surprisingly forceful.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Hard Candy is extreme - a battle of the sexes that glides from tricky to angry to shockingly ugly.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A good satire that had the untimely bad luck to be about a U.S. soldier who will do anything it takes to party, except fight for the right.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Feels cramped and underimagined. I think Judge is capable of making an inspired live-action comedy, but next time he'll have to remember to do what he does in his animated ones--keep the madness popping.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    Halloween: Resurrection comes closer to comatainment.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    this unfairly maligned sci-fi comedy testifies that Eddie Murphy still has the gift of surprise.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a tale soggy with the kind of race/class lessons that Madea, the director-star's battle-ax alter ego, doles out far more handily (and entertainingly) in a single church-lady-from-hell zinger.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A deliciously amusing socio-culinary prank.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Rock gives Good Hair a rousing message: Where African-Americans in the '60s adopted a ''natural'' look, they now feel free to coif their heads any way they want. That's cultural power.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Carpenter never was the filmmaker his cult claimed him to be, but in Escape From L.A., he at least has the instinct to keep his hero moving, like some leather-biker Candide.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Despite its logy, red-herring structure, the film has enough enigma and weirdness that it gradually stirs to life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Funny, pungent, and weirdly gripping.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It has been put together with just enough efficiency to qualify as an oddball labor of love.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Lust, Caution wants us to feel the erotic ping of buttoned-up people ripping open those buttons, but too often it's the film's drama that's under wraps.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    A primer no one needed, Where in the World Is Osama bin Laden? should have been called "The Post-9/11 World for Dummies."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    If they handed out an Academy Award for Most Gripping Graphs and Charts, this film would take it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 33 Owen Gleiberman
    I gave up making heads or tails of Synecdoche, New York, but I did get one message: The compulsion to stand outside of one's life and observe it to THIS degree isn't the mechanism of art -- it's the structure of psychosis.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Harold and Kumar share a quality the overgrown adolescents in films like this are never allowed to possess: They're witty, focused, and highly aware. They make having a brain look hip.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is consistently entertaining; it sucks you in. James Spader is a little too recessive, yet he lends the action a core of wormy anxiety.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Sean Connery and Nicolas Cage inject tasty bits of personality into their roles.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Barton Fink has an atmosphere of languid comic anxiety (it's like a cross between "Eraserhead" and "Angel Heart"), and it's fun to watch, if only because you have no idea what's coming next.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Carrey isn't afraid to go happily psycho, like Peter Sellers or Eminem on his funniest tracks, and that's his edge.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Godard, as always, sounds full of insight, yet he uses the past to damn the present in a way that may be reflexively self-serving. In Praise of Love leaves a taste as bitter as poison ash.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    The most excitingly original movie of the year.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Lee, as he did in ''Malcolm X'' and ''Clockers,'' makes his hero's dread palpable, and though 25th Hour lacks the glittering brilliance of those films, I was held by the toughness and pity of Lee's gaze.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The director, Paul Schrader, tries for cleansing audacity, but ends up too close to farce.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Hartley is trapped between sincerity and mock sincerity, and that all but dooms a filmmaker to slipping through the cracks.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    For sheer dramatic wallop outpowers virtually every fiction feature I've seen this year.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Mafioso does more than cast its fascinating shadow over "The Godfather." It captures, in a stark yet haunting way, the indelible fact that no man is born a mobster.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Collapses into the most generic sort of teen movie-ville, just at the moment it's convinced you that its lightly appealing stars are capable of better.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Ryder, good as she was in The Age of Innocence, gives her first true star performance here. Beneath her crisp, postfeminist manner, Lelaina is bristling with confusion, and Ryder lets you read every crosscurrent of temptation and anxiety, the way her tentative search for love slowly grows into a restless hunger. Yearning, hilarious, lost within their precocious self-awareness, these slackers have soul.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Glazed over by its worship of Che Guevara.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie has a real kick to it. As Paul and Annie attempt to outsmart each other, Misery gets nastier and nastier. It turns into a psychotic cat-and-mouse game, and there are some genuine shocks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Pictorial but oddly muffled three-hour saga of romance and capitalism, not necessarily in that order.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Soft-core trash with a tent-show hook.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The Daytrippers has some of the wacky dysfunctional chic that made David O. Russell’s Flirting With Disaster such a grating experience, but writer-director Greg Mottola has a lighter, warmer touch; his characters don’t have to act like pigs in order to prove they’re human.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    In the Shadow of the Moon finds new resonance in the moment when America redefined progress -- but also when it heeded the siren song of a world so desolate it reminded you what a paradise ours truly is.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's the first Hollywood Iraq movie to remind me of a Vietnam film like Coming Home, and it does more than disturb. It scalds, moves, and heals.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Liman, for all his craft, doesn't have enough FUN with the premise.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 33 Owen Gleiberman
    Myers is trying for another of his endearingly hormonal imp-egomaniacs, but hidden behind a wavy beard, a wax-curled mustache, and an astoundingly ugly squashed fake nose, he's a little too grotesque.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There are too many secondhand characters roving through Paris.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Badly lit and at times, awkwardly inspirational, yet there's real feeling in it, especially when the movie suggests that Tourette's syndrome is every bit as pure an expression of the spirit as it is a ''disorder.''
    • 81 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    What the film leaves unexplained is how this joyous musical outpouring, which predated the revolution, could fare under a system with a pathological distrust of beauty.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The surprise of The Ringer is that the movie is pretty damn funny.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Just when you thought you’d erased the memory of Adam Sandler in Billy Madison playing a slobbo idiot who must prove he’s worthy of taking over his father’s business, along comes Chris Farley playing a slobbo ; idiot who must prove he’s worthy of taking over his father’s business. Yet this movie, unlike Sandler’s fiasco, does at least have a few scuzzy laughs.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Cool, assured, emotionally remote, Merchant Ivory's Surviving Picasso is never less than watchable, but it's also a cinematic paradox, a movie that works to capture Picasso from every angle yet somehow misses the fire in his belly.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Chatwin comes off as prickly and annoyed -- they should have called this "Perturbia."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Moore makes Halley's awakening organic and touching. In an age when most teenagers are up to their eyeballs in postmodern consumer glitz, her movies seem radical not just in their retro squareness but in their unfashionable embrace of faith over ironic flippancy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A no-frills docu-Dogma plainness, yet Miller lingers on invisible, nearly psychic nuances, leaping into digressions of memory and desire. She boxes these women's souls right open for us.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The writing is zippy, the story spins like a top, and Bardem turns out to be the wittiest of leading men.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A movie as layered and enthralling as its subject.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is held together by Clive Owen, who spends most of his time on screen hidden beneath matted hair and a scruffy beard but still has more aura than any actor around.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Brokeback Mountain is that rare thing, a big Hollywood weeper with a beautiful ache at its center. It's a modern-age Western that turns into a quietly revolutionary love story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The director's famously over-deliberate, pause-laden style verges, for the first time, on amateurville, and that gives us too much time to linger on the movie's more bizarre details.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    That's Trumbo's message -- that the true victim was America.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    A big, dumb, crude, noisy, goose-the-audience bash and proud of it. It's not nearly as unsettling as ''28 Days Later.''
    • 53 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Wilson has a scene near the end with Marley that's the most wrenchingly tender acting of his career.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The man has the right to retire, but what will he do with all the words in his head?
    • 25 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Another racial cartoon buddy movie that eagerly flogs its best laugh -- indeed, its only laugh -- in the trailer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The director, Joseph Lovett, wants us to ask if there's such a thing as too much freedom, and he has the sobriety to say yes -- and no.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    If you're going to say the unsayable and stay charming while doing so, it helps to look more like Sarah Silverman than Andrew Dice Clay.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Feels like an attempt to rebottle the postmodern fizz of Wes Anderson's "Bottle Rocket." I wish instead they'd put a stopper in it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Trust, the cult-movie view turns precious and smug.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A twisty, showy, atmosphere-saturated drama that revels (in a post-post-Tarantino-and-''Trainspotting'' way) in sadism and in-your-face seediness -- and attracts a cast of coolios primed to play extreme.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    As a fantasy, Orlando has been spun out of a rather glib idea: that the mere assertion of Androgyny As Destiny is automatically a brave, emotionally triumphant stance for our time. The truth is, when androgyny is shrouded in this much deadening ”art,” it becomes little more than a haughty exercise in academic chic.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The atmosphere of gentle communal chaos is authentic enough to become the movie's dramatic center.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    This pleasantly rote movie will rouse you.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    Most of the jokes are so lame that Chevy Chase can’t even be bothered to look nonchalant. A sadder excuse for a movie would be hard to imagine.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    In the history of rock-star indulgence on film, I would rank it somewhere between Bob Dylan's epic carnival of pretension ''Renaldo & Clara'' and the overblown messianic doldrums of 1982's ''Pink Floyd The Wall.''
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    The cruddy, shot-in-a-warehouse settings are especially depressing, since the computer-generated special effects seem to be taking place in another movie entirely (a far livelier one). [9 Jan 1998, p. 47]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    It's wonderful to see a Japanese movie in which a samurai, for all his somber discipline and skill, is also a touching and complicated ordinary man.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The joy of cartoons meets the agony of office politics in this fascinating, inside- Hollywood-baseball documentary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    One Missed Call is so unoriginal that the movie could almost be a parody of J-horror tropes, yet Miike, for a while at least, stages it with a dread-soaked visual flair that allows you to enjoy being manipulated.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The Australian actress Frances O'Connor is a true find. She's as beautiful as the young Barbara Hershey, with a stare that's pensive yet playful, and she puts us in touch with the quiet battle of emotions in Fanny.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Isn't a very funny movie (it preaches nonconformity in the rote style of an overlit sitcom), but Wilson, at least, keeps it afloat.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Soul Men could have done with less amped-up abrasiveness and more soft-shoe charm.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Gory but dramatically inert vampire schlocker.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Guess Who, with its PG-13 putdowns, turns into the kind of love story that Hollywood feels most comfortable with: a buddy movie, salt-and-pepper variety. All that's missing is the cop car.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Unknown White Male is framed as a look at the mystery of identity, but there's a bizarre neutrality to the movie, since it makes Bruce's life just as detached and remote to us as it seems to him.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Trees Lounge is so deft, funny, and light-handed it may not be until the film’s shattering final image that you realize you’ve been watching one of the most lived-in portraits of an alcoholic ever made.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Cameron wants to take the audience ''back to 'Titanic,''' but the journey's magic is hemmed in, paradoxically, by the transcendence of his previous effort; surely he must know that a lot of us never left.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The camera loves Banderas -- a velvet stud -- as much as it did the young Clint Eastwood.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Though the events have a rambling overfamiliarity, there's a real story between the lines: the resentment over the U.S. occupation on the part of non-insurgent Iraqis.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    Dour, absurdist, gruesomely awful.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    What it comes down to is superbly staged battle scenes and moral alliances forged in earnest yet purged of the wit and dynamic, bristly ego that define true on-screen personality.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Lawrence, as always, exerts the appeal of a con man too lightweight to buy into his own con. He'd be funnier, though, if he didn't insist on being the only funny thing in the room.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is one soporific, depressed, deadeningly vague scene after another.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    There's only one performer in the movie who looks completely at ease with what he's doing: the horse.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    It's no exaggeration to say that the actors have less personality than the pipes, nail guns, grinding gears, decaying beams, and slowly spreading oil spills that are fused, with a kind of empty-dread technical precision, into Rube Goldberg torture devices.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    As he rises to each challenge, you realize that von Trier, the most exalted of prankish sadists, has orchestrated the filmmaking equivalent of the story of Job. The Five Obstructions glories in art, life, and the faith that binds them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    The most frightening thing about this movie is that King and Romero actually thought it was scary.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Offhand, I can’t think of an actor who could use a brain implant more. The trouble isn’t that Reeves talks like a surfer dude; it’s that he tries so hard not to talk like a surfer dude.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a heartfelt movie that could have used a zigzaggier undercurrent, though Olyphant, in the sort of role that Paul Newman used to swagger through, has a star's easy command.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Even from the safety of a movie seat, you can just about feel the stinging hardness of the surf. Blue crush? This is more like white smash.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A funny and madly arresting new documentary.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Proof that a thriller can be sleekly shot, expertly cast, paced with crisp professionalism...and still be a letdown if its twists and turns hold no more surprise than yesterday's weather report.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    By the end of Nowhere Boy, you'll feel you know John Lennon better than you ever did.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    The film suggests Titanic in a giant wading pool.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The film evokes how homicide became the ultimate orgasm for kids who had turned themselves into zombies of flesh.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    By the end, the main thing that's been abused is the audience's intelligence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Roth, there's no denying, creates considerable suspense out of our desire to confront the forbidden.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 16 Owen Gleiberman
    With jokes this lame you won't have to worry as much about your children getting any bad ideas.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Had ''Boogie Nights'' been the tale of a California dreamer with a really long skateboard, the movie's delirious first half would have been ''Dogtown and Z-Boys,'' and its downbeat conclusion would be Stoked.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Just when you're sure that Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo can't get any less funny, the movie douses the trailer's best gag, as that prosthetic leg turns out to be attached to Deuce's true love.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Homicide is engrossing, at least for a while, but the truly personal movie it wants to be remains locked up in Mamet’s head.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    As heavy with message as any Hollywood delinquent drama of the late '50s.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    At two hours and 32 minutes, this is almost too much movie, but it has a malicious, careening zest all its own. It's a ride for the gut AND the brain.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Zwick offers excitingly staged moments, but once you get past the novelty of WWII Jews acting this heroically macho, Defiance bogs down in a not very well-developed script.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The key to The Company is the quiet, focused rapture of Neve Campbell, who formally trained in ballet and performed all of her on-screen dances. The tranquil delight she takes in her body becomes its own eloquent form of acting.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The Muppets were once devilish and sly, but this ploddingly whimsical musical caper, which uses too many ’70s soul songs to signify its rainbow-demographic cred, is enough to make you want to see them get slapped around by the Teletubbies (at this point, a far funkier crew).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A little of this sort of thing goes a long way, but no one does it better than Myers.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Thorogood allegedly confessed on his deathbed (in 1993) that he killed Jones, and while the movie convinces us that this might have happened, it never truly reveals who Brian Jones was before he fell apart. His indulgence, and his demise, play out in a void.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    JFK
    [Stone's] filmmaking is so supple and alive, his obsession with the visual aspect of history so electrifying, that JFK practically roots itself in your imagination.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    A fizzy and delirious high-camp message-movie musical that may just turn out to be the happiest movie of the summer.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Too poky and contrived to be a good movie, but its lushly serene atmospherics, given current events, make it a pure slice of sentimental comfort food.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    This is the richest role Paltrow has had since ''Shakespeare in Love,'' and she rises to the challenge. She digs deep into Plath's mercurial nature, giving us a Sylvia who's fiercely independent and alive yet burdened with demons of insecurity that bubble up in a rage.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    There are fine, fresh observational moments, but the film is much ado about not so much.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Casino Jack is really a look at how the culture of Washington was rebuilt to sell itself to the highest bidder.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The final affirmation of this romance is really an affirmation of Baumbach's talent: that a young filmmaker fixated on the solipsistic rituals of guyhood understands the hearts of women, too.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    The Exorcist III has the feel of a nightmare catechism lesson, or a horror movie made by a depressed monk.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    The Hunchback of Notre Dame is a beautiful and transporting experience — the best, I think, of Disney’s serious animated features in the multiplex era.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    A wonderful movie, a delicate and touching drama that takes us deep inside the eccentric competitive mystique of grandmaster chess.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    A movie in which laughter and self-exploitation merge into jolly soft-porn ''empowerment.''
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s witty and moving but a touch repetitive, and it goes on for too long. That said, Jenkins has made the most intimate comedy imaginable about the fertility blues. Private Life hits some delicate nerves, and heals a few of them too.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Control goes past the clichés of punk rock-god gloom to offer a snapshot of alienation that's shockingly humane.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Pi
    The movie's freakazoid intensity gets to you, but there's something at once cramped and show-offy in Aronofsky's refusal to even slighty vary its atmosphere of shock-corridor burnout.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    The only brazen thing about the film is how shamelessly it rips off "School of Rock."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    With its this-is-really-happening vibe, Paranormal Activity scrapes away 30 years of encrusted nightmare clichés. The fear is real, all right, because the fear is really in you.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    The film is a jokey, nattering fiasco, as awful as Hudson Hawk. And yet, like that famous disaster, it never loses its aura of precocious self-satisfaction.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Even when the catharsis we yearn for arrives, it's tinged with restraint. But then, the true romance in Shall We Dance? is more than personal. It's the spectacle of a nation learning to dance with itself.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The Farrellys may well be the new kingpins of adolescent slob comedy, but There's Something About Mary doesn't approach the witty anarchy of movies like "Animal House," "The Naked Gun," or "Hairspray."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    An Australian crime caper that's one part ''Sexy Beast,'' one part ''The Full Monty,'' and three parts very flat soda.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Andrew Wagner has made a lovely comedy of death and rebirth.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Ritchie concocts a crime-jungle demimonde that's organically linked to the real world, and it's a damn fun one to visit.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    There’s something weirdly innocent about Shanley’s ineptitude: He seems to be inventing the oldest cliches for the very first time. The movie doesn’t really hit bottom, though, until he has Ryan deliver an ickily earnest monologue about how her character is ”soul-sick.” I think she means, ”Pass the Pepto-Bismol.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Strenous yet flat, The Brothers Grimm is a let's-see-what-sticks spectacle that, coming from Terry Gilliam, is more grim than "Grimm."
    • 32 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, while heartfelt and vividly shot, takes too many rote genre turns.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A fascinating and lovingly crafted musical documentary that nevertheless misunderstands its own subject.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A good movie? Hardly. But more than enough to pass a dog day afternoon.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a tale that reduces angst, not to mention love, to a generational tic.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    It's the closest the movies have come in a while to the nudgy, knowing fairy-tale enchantment of "The Princess Bride."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Smart People, unlike "Sideways" or "The Savages," has a plot that's a little too rote.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In her sassy but scrubbed way, Bynes is a real charmer, and What a Girl Wants is a likable throwaway.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The Secret Life of Bees is a lesson -- or, rather, a whole series of them -- we no longer need to learn. Of course, it's also a divine-sisterhood-defeats-all chick flick, and on that score there's no denying that its clichés are rousingly up to date.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is so prefab, so plastically aware of being ''corny,'' ''romantic,'' and ''old-fashioned,'' that it feels programmed to make you fall in love with it.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 33 Owen Gleiberman
    How lame have high-concept, no-brain comedies gotten?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Turns out to be the portrait of a serial yo-yo dieter, an impression enhanced by the 60 year old Berlin, who suggests less a former depraved scenester than a calorie compulsive Martha Stewart grown bored with good taste.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    Maddin chops it up into a feature-length antique-bloodsucker video, and the result takes hold neither as dance nor as silent horror dream.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Scrappy and rambling and overly earnest.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, like the book, is a work of opportunistic gamesmanship, a luridly farfetched conspiracy thriller masquerading as an inquiry into the zeitgeist. You can't take Disclosure very seriously, yet the film has been made with cleverness and skill, and with a keen eye for the latest styles in corporate paranoia and ruthlessness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Hugh Grant has grown up, holding on to his lightness and witty cynicism but losing the stuttering sherry-club mannerisms that were once his signature. In doing so, he has blossomed into the rare actor who can play a silver-tongued sleaze with a hidden inner decency.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    As skewed, prismatic, and free of fluff as the man himself.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Allen's latest, Cassandra's Dream, is one of his debonair ''small'' entertainments, the closest that he has come to doing a tidy, no-frills, down-and-dirty genre thriller.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    By the time Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is over, it may send more than a few viewers scurrying off to the bookstore. They'll surely want to see what all the fuss was about.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It's memorable when it meditates on the changing face of where we look at art, and how that changes the art itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    To call Match Point Woody Allen's comeback would be an understatement - it's the most vital return to form for any director since Robert Altman made "The Player."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    This is, after all, not just Robert Redford. It's Redford in the nobly burnished self-mythologic perfection of his late-middle-aged golden god-ness.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The cast is a pitch-perfect assemblage of pretty young things, but James Van Der Beek, as a slit-eyed dorm stud, proves that he can be an actor of cruel force.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    The film knows how absurd this is, yet its triumph is that, by the end, we're actually rooting for Mary to see the library as her salvation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a messy, entertaining documentary rooted in -- though not limited to -- the iconically indulgent years of Fellini's later career.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 33 Owen Gleiberman
    Bloodless and false.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Lurie hits closer to the bone here than he did in his ham-handed "The Contender" (2000).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A highly calculated act of mischief that sounds like a stunt cooked up for Howard Stern's radio show.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    A sentimental epic that forgets to include the sentiment
    • 46 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Don't let the Carl Hiaasen pedigree fool you: Hoot is an Afterschool Special too crummy to give a hoot about.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    When Baron Cohen works without a net, he flies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Bluntly put, Neil Young’s music now has too much integrity and not enough hooks, and so does Year of the Horse. The rough-grain Super-8 images, while a nifty visual correlative to the Crazy Horse sound, deny us the fundamental pleasure of a concert movie — a sense of intimacy with the band’s performance.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The film should have been called ''Lock, Stock and Two Wilting Barrels.''
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It's a mad cycle of arrogance and despair, and Bloody Sunday etches it onto your nervous system.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Basquiat is an engrossing spectacle, but by the end, as a zoned-out Basquiat stands regally in a cruising Jeep, we realize that Schnabel has reconfigured his story as a kind of ghostly myth, and that we've never completely seen the man behind it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It’s really one of the very first, very early Gen-X movies (the true first one, to me, is 1978’s terrific Over the Edge), and I was struck all over again by the freshness of what it captured: these four prematurely jaded adolescent girls, led by Jodie Foster as the sensible one, living like baby adults, cut off from their parents and the past, bonded only by attitude, consumerism, and the pop-culture decadence they share.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Going the Distance may be a minor movie, but it's also the rare romantic comedy in which you can actually believe what you're seeing.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    It whisks you to another world, then makes it every inch our own.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    It's no coincidence that The Box plays like the world's murkiest Twilight Zone episode. It's loosely based on ''Button, Button,'' a short story by Richard Matheson, who wrote some of the series' greatest scripts.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is funny when it's nasty, as when Ron and Veronica trade insults at the anchor desk. Most of the time, though, it's not nasty enough.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 33 Owen Gleiberman
    Jack Frost is so treacly and fake it makes you feel like you’re trapped in a winter-wonderland paperweight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    5x2
    Feminist sanctimony, it turns out, looks much the same forward and backward.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    In this quiet, absorbing, shades-of-gray drama, a kind of thriller meditation on the schism in Northern Ireland, we get the story of not one but two powerfully opposing heroes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    Shepard's charisma has always reached back to an earlier time, so it's easy to accept him as a kind of pre-counterculture hero - Eastwood without the sneer - who aged into the era of tabloid scandal.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A hit-or-miss affair that starts out wobbly and then gathers comic momentum.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    Joshua does grow a bit repetitious (it lacks the cathartic climaxes of a horror film), yet it has cool and savvy fun with your fears.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A gory, pulpy wink of an action thriller, was spun out of a parody trailer Rodriguez directed for the '70s-trash homage "Grindhouse" (2007). The trailer was sublime. As a feature, Machete is more fun than it isn't, but its deadpan mockery of exploitation clichés often slips a bit too close to being the real, schlocky thing.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is cheesy, tacky, and gimmicky. But as directed by Mark Waters (Mean Girls), it's also prankish and inventive enough to be kind of fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    As a love-jones soap opera, Brown Sugar feeds right into Dre's nostalgic crankiness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    To say that Eastwood, who directed, has done a first-rate job of adaptation fails to do him justice. What he's brought off is closer to alchemy.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Aspires to blasphemy but achieves only banality.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The House of Sand's director, Andrucha Waddington, lays on the Awesome Visual Poetry and throws in a welter of story gimmicks, but it's all a bit too fancifully arid.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    As enjoyable as most of Unforgiven is, Eastwood's shades-of-gray moralism feels like a whitewash.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    You giggle every so often, but you never give yourself over to the characters.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    It's doubtful that even a real actress could have triumphed over the rusty tinsel of Glitter, a hapless, retro-'80s ''Star Is Born.''
    • 57 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    I wish I could say that the film is half as intriguing as it sounds, but A Woman, a Gun... lacks the Coen brothers' precision, their diabolical game-board cleverness. It's a remake in shaggy outline only.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie, quite simply, goes to sleep whenever Zatoichi isn't fighting. When he is, it's a pulp dazzler.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    The essential spark of surprise is missing. The mechanics of ''breathless'' suspense are blanketed by an atmosphere of creeping caution.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    For all the nimbleness of its first half and the chemical zing of Pitt and Jolie, the film devolves into a fractious and explosive mess, hitting the same note of ''ironic'' violence over and over.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    As a fairy-tale confection, a kind of West Side Story in Jamestown, Pocahontas is pleasant to look at, and it will probably satisfy very small kiddies, but it's the first of the new-era Disney cartoons that feels less than animated.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Simon Pegg has what it takes, but he's saddled himself with a script (co-written by Pegg and Michael Ian Black) that Adam Sandler wouldn't have pulled out of his bottom drawer.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    As tricky and satisfying as any of David Mamet's airless cinematic shell games. Mamet's films are all plot and no atmosphere; this one has a squalid, urban-greed-meets-the-gutter mood that lends its filigreed cleverness an unusually resonant kick.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Toy Story 3 is a salute to the magic of making believe.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    A movie in which the easy socio-racial paradoxes have been diagrammed with more care than the relationships
    • 51 Metascore
    • 0 Owen Gleiberman
    When a kids’ flick has nothing to offer but cute special effects, it’s easy to think the filmmakers are patting themselves on the backs for their technical ingenuity. That’s not comic fantasy — that’s marketing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie has a few jokes, but it could have used some of the canny, real-world logic that made Rain Man so convincing (and funny).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Starts out as a neo-Pygmalion comedy, but the film is slow, earnest, and rhythmless.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    An idiot variation on Frank Capra's ''Mr. Deeds Goes to Town,'' might have been thrown together in even less time than it takes Sandler to get dressed in the morning; it feels sort of like the dumbest corporate comedy of 1987.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    Trying for a dark-toned comedy of familial mishap, Keaton dips into the sentimental fraudulence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Easy A has some agreeable fast banter, but it's so self-consciously stylized that it wears you out.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 58 Owen Gleiberman
    A melancholy romance that has the distinction of being the first film set among San Francisco dotcommers that knows it's about the end of the boom.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    If I respect Downfall more than I was enthralled by it, that's because its portayal stops short of revelation. Once you witness Hitler's denial, the film has little more to say about him.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    It turns out that speeding along dirt roads isn't nearly as photogenic - or as varied - as surfing is.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    There's nothing corny, however, about the climactic shoot-out, which Costner has staged superbly as an extended logistical mini-war that surges and rifle-cracks with bloody abandon through what feels like every building in town. Call it dances with guns.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Aaron Woolf's we-are-what-we-eat documentary King Corn is a lively introduction to the corn industrial complex.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It's an enjoyable ramble, with a feel for what made the early days of rock as wild as any that followed.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The two stars are like cool kids pretending to be tortured poets pretending to be cool. Neither can match the screen presence — the shameless self-infatuated ebullience — of Matthew Lillard, who does a wickedly grotesque turn as Brock Hudson, a kind of goggle-eyed Puck manqué in the film's dead-on send-up of "The Real World."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Plato's Retreat was a buffet of bodies, and the film catches the moment America could think that was tasty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    Shot in vivid black and white, the movie is like "Village of the Damned" directed by Ingmar Bergman, only without Bergman's intensity.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    In its low grade way, this blithely brutal cops and drugs thriller is an efficient hot wire entertainment.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is a footnote as well, a minor reference back to the days when people yearned for a cinema that was serious and erotic at the same time.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    If it's possible to be a rip-off with wit, Disturbia qualifies.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 75 Owen Gleiberman
    A blatant re-spin of ''The Fast and the Furious'' that also happens to be a far better movie.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    The tale itself is so spectacularly perverse, and the film stays so authentically close to the personalities involved, that you don't feel dirty -- you feel cleansed.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 16 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie wants you to giggle and say, ”Yup, we sure are saps, aren’t we?”
    • 34 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    This is just silliness run mildly wild.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    Emotionally mesmerizing.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 42 Owen Gleiberman
    Without that heightened racial antipathy-turned-camaraderie, there's not a whole lot to Cop Out besides watching Kevin Smith pretend, with a crudeness that is simply boring, that he's an action director making a comic thriller about cops versus a Mexican drug gang (yawn).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Owen Gleiberman
    The movie is too cute to lose its head in the music. It never generates its own ecstasy.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Owen Gleiberman
    They're like gods at play, paragons of pure delight, as they mock and feign their way through a universe of mere mortals. To see the movie again is to realize that they were never entirely of this earth and that they never will be.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    At once brasher and more frivolous, she's a lot less compelling fighting for the welfare of lab-test animals than she was crusading for her own dignity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Owen Gleiberman
    Hopping from Germany to Turkey and back again, Akin is out to capture the ways that a globalized world can tear up our hearts, and repair them, too.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Owen Gleiberman
    Leaves you with the dismaying sensation that Levinson, who should probably be off making his own version of ''The Player,'' has instead crafted a comedy of self-loathing, burying himself in a movie that deserves to be Vapoorized.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    It would be tempting to say that fractured time sequences in movies have become a cliché, except that Wicker Park makes your brain spin in surprising and pleasurable ways.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 67 Owen Gleiberman
    It's not every day that one of our rogues' gallery of iconic psycho killers gets to be played by a creepy and fascinating actor -- in this case, Jackie Earle Haley taking on the role of Freddy Krueger.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Owen Gleiberman
    A large-scale military drama with a quiet, almost mournful center.

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