Peter Bradshaw

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For 1,920 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Peter Bradshaw's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Funny Pages
Lowest review score: 20 Baggage Claim
Score distribution:
1920 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Bradshaw
    Although the character of Gru is mildly funny, the minions are unfunny without him and have never convincingly attained spin-off hero status. This is another of those intellectual property concepts whose trademarked quirky voices and characters should be laid to rest.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Bradshaw
    The film clunks on, acted with no flair or charisma by anyone in the cast and no energy or interest in the direction. A Rodriguez or a Tarantino – or, indeed, a Schrader – might have found something in the film’s episodic structure and its gallery of grotesques, but, as it is, this is just leaden.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    The film conforms to the coming-of-age template in that romance is followed or superseded by friendship and maturing personal growth. Urzendowsky keeps it all together.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    When the wisps of khat smoke clear away, it is perhaps not easy to decide exactly what is left behind, or to decide if khat is a cultural practice to be celebrated or rejected: but there are some marvellous images and moods in this misty, impressionistic study.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Kokkali persuasively enacts both the emotional hurt and emotional healing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    This is a fluent and very watchable work, and Johnson and Burghardt carry it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Pleasure doesn’t take a doomily disapproving line on porn, and real pornstars and agents are given cameos. Yet neither is it necessarily celebratory or porn-positive. The people in charge are overwhelmingly male and Thyberg shows how the power relations in the business are really the same as they ever were.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    The film just bounces along, zipping through its running time.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Bradshaw
    A nice, creepy performance from Hemsworth, with Teller gamely going along with the script, but having stretched out the story idea to feature-film length, the film doesn’t really give the sense that it knows where it is going.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    The film has charm as well as a certain deja vu for audiences, although for me it didn’t quite have the distinction of Marnie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    It’s acted with such terrific panache that not enjoying it is impossible.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 20 Peter Bradshaw
    A dead-eyed Chris Pratt presides over this convoluted mess of Bond-style villains and toothless action that even the original cast can’t save from extinction.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Like Werner Herzog, Kier’s German accent lends a deadpan drollery to everything he says, but there is a gooey soft-centre to his film, and Kier carries that off reasonably well, his face becoming almost boyish. Another intriguing persona in the Udo Kier gallery.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Bradshaw
    This struck me as that kind of comedy horror in which (like much romantic comedy) the “comedy” half of the equation has gone missing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Hepburn is in the boho-gamine mode, and this has a brittle charm, (arguably more than in Breakfast At Tiffany's four years later) but there is something unconvincing in the May-to-December pairing of 28-year-old Hepburn and 58-year-old Astaire and also something grumpy and not particularly classy about the way this film shrieks with laughter at silly modern women filling their empty heads with trendy Parisian intellectualism.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    A valuable if slightly passionless and reticent movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    The film declines to offer up its meaning, or its reason for being, and asks us to think about something outside the passage of time.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Bradshaw
    This is a glossy piece of Netflix content, but it relies very heavily on NBA fan buy-in for the drama fully to work; there is a continuous series of recognition jolts provided by the stars and legends playing themselves.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    [A] terrific debut feature.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    It is a tough story, told with conviction.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    This documentary does something very few films can: it makes you grin with pleasure.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Peter Bradshaw
    This is a genuinely bizarre, startling, freewheelingly lo-fi and funny indie picture with the refreshing bad-taste impact of Todd Solondz or Robert Crumb.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Peter Bradshaw
    Everything in Showing Up is certainly valid, but I confess I thought it lacked some perspective on Lizzie’s life, and it is sometimes a bit studied and passionless, especially compared with Reichardt’s previous film, First Cow. But there is sympathy and charm and food for thought.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    Albert Serra’s bizarre epic is a cheese-dream of French imperial tristesse, political paranoia and an apocalyptic despair. It is a nightmare that moves as slowly and confidently as a somnambulist, and its pace, length, and Serra’s beautiful widescreen panoramic framings – in which conventional drama is almost camouflaged or lost – may divide opinion. I can only say I was captivated by the film and its stealthy evocation of pure evil.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    Here is a film about a very complicated and painful kind of coming of age, or maybe a meditation on “coming of age” as something that never actually happens; it also examines the illusory dividing line between childhood and adulthood, innocence and experience, present and past.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    There’s no doubting the force of this drenchingly sad story.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Bradshaw
    The movie is fundamentally silly, with tiringly shallow characterisation and broad streaks of crime-drama intrigue, which only underline the fact that not a single word of it is really believable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Bradshaw
    Sad to say, it goes down like a cup of tepid, milky and over-sugared tea.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Peter Bradshaw
    Epically tiresome. ... What is exasperating about the film is its reluctance to dramatise the teaching: to show the young people themselves simply getting better at acting.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Peter Bradshaw
    Mario Martone’s beautifully shot and superbly composed film teeters on the edge of something special. And if it doesn’t quite achieve that, settling in the end for something more generically crime-oriented, it’s still very good.

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