Steven Scaife

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For 43 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 23% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 73% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Steven Scaife's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 88 Identifying Features
Lowest review score: 25 We Summon the Darkness
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 43
  2. Negative: 10 out of 43
43 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    Ultrasound never quite figures out how to keep going once its mysteries have been unraveled.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    Keating’s film forgets the cardinal rule of good pastiche: that if you’re not building something new from familiar pieces then you’re just regurgitating old ideas.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Scaife
    Throughout, Josephine Decker effortlessly keys her intimate and eccentric style to her main character’s complicated inner turmoil.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Scaife
    The film provides no space to explore its relationships, and as a result there’s little friction to the climax.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    After a while, writer-director Iuli Gerbase’s boldly mundane take on forced isolation gives way to a regular sort of mundanity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Scaife
    The film is a thoughtful examination of the human desire for it and the accompanying hope that it may exorcise the emptiness we feel.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    The film capsizes in the absence of a compelling center for Mélanie Laurent to hang her directorial panache.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    We Need to Do Something mainly succeeds at suggesting a more compelling film beyond its bathroom walls.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Scaife
    The film has the knowing swagger of something on the cutting edge but none of the self-awareness to realize it’s late to the party.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    Travis Stevens’s film is psychologically astute, until it gives itself over to turning subtext into extremely legible text.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Scaife
    Violation impressively pushes against the typically straightforward trajectory of the rape-revenge film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Scaife
    The film’s characters hardly possess a sense of a history or an interior life to adequately convey racism’s psychic toll.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    The problem with Earwig and the Witch has more to do with its confused plotting than its more or less serviceable animation.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Scaife
    The film is as much about the act of seeing and observing as it is about not seeing, about struggling to recognize that which might not clarify much at all.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    Hunted intends to make a show of our desensitization to predator-prey relationships, but the greater purpose of its self-awareness never quite comes into clear focus.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Scaife
    Roseanne Liang leverages the absolute implausibility of the film’s later scenes into something brisk and exciting right to the very end.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Scaife
    Nicolas Cage’s amusing turn as a kooky hermit with an affinity for newspaper hats often feels awkwardly spliced into the film.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Scaife
    The film has an exciting, lived-in quality that elevates what are otherwise some markedly unsteady attempts at horror.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    If Quirke’s film means to mimic the tunnel vision of its protagonist, it does so perhaps too effectively, losing its thematic potency as it travels on a predictable trajectory, involving spooky drawings and sisterly spats, all the while leaving the existential miasma sitting out of frame.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Scaife
    For all of its ostensible thoughtfulness, in trying to describe “real art,” Random Acts of Violence ultimately doesn’t describe anything at all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Scaife
    The film is strikingly fixated on exploring loss and pain on an intimate and personal scale.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Scaife
    The film heralds the arrival a bold and formidable voice in horror cinema.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Steven Scaife
    The film’s animation leans into its most jerky, artificial qualities, all the better to enhance the atmosphere of bizarre unreality.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Scaife
    Rather than a simplistic, straightforward parable of greed, Bad Education depicts its true events with a surprising amount of depth and ambiguity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Steven Scaife
    Through its exploration of Selah’s complexities, as well as the bravado and posturing that comes with being a credible drug dealer, Selah and the Spades locates a larger truth about the presentation of self and maintaining one’s image.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Scaife
    The film’s cat-and-mouse antics play out with no sense of escalation or invention.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Steven Scaife
    It comes across like yet another casualty in the long line of stories about men having their eyes opened by their angelic girlfriends.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Steven Scaife
    The film is at its weakest when it has to do drama, since the fallout of Mo and Zeke’s actions feels perfunctory and tossed-off in the rush to an ending, a hasty come-down after the proverbial party.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Steven Scaife
    Writer-director Jason Lei Howden’s humor might have been tolerable if his film was at least reasonably imaginative.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 25 Steven Scaife
    Nicolas Pesce evincing little of the promise he showed in his prior films, and even less drive to remake the old into something new.

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