For 2,418 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ty Burr's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Roma
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
2418 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Any movie on this subject that’s not uncomfortable isn’t really doing its job, and Ben Is Back puts an audience through a wringer of emotional and physical suspense. If you’ve dealt with addiction, personally or in your extended family, the movie should probably come with a trigger warning.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    One of the wittiest and most creatively exuberant movies of the year, and maybe one of the best.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    The movie is less a movie than a collection of scenes lined up in a row, and the tone wobbles between pomp and circumstantial melodrama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    A brisk and reasonably thorough dog trot through a life that was simultaneously invisible and all powerful, and it’s goosed along with slick production techniques that more than once get in the way.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Like all the best films, Roma is achingly specific while constantly opening up to the universal.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    It’s in theory the worst family movie of 2018 — and in practice one of the year’s best films.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The movie itself is great fun before it curdles intentionally into nastiness and drift.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    By far the best part of Say Her Name: The Life and Death of Sandra Bland is that we get to see her face and hear her words.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    The movie’s dramatically uneven, as anthology movies tend to be, but is it worth watching on the big screen? If the idea of Monument Valley peopled with classic Coen misfits hits your sweet spot, by all means go.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    It’s the kind of movie that hammers on your heart even as it’s tripping over its feet, hobbled by unexamined notions of race, ethnicity, and class. Don’t look too closely, and you’ll have a very good time.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Ty Burr
    Burning, from South Korea’s Lee Chang-dong, is a beautifully cryptic slow burner that lingers long in the senses. It’s the kind of film where you obsess over what it means, the better to avoid thinking about how it makes you feel.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    A reporter is never the story — the story is the story. But if looking at the reporter helps you see the story, and the human beings the story is about, then the effort may be worth it. A Private War is worth it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 38 Ty Burr
    And that’s what The Girl in the Spider’s Web is: soulless, bloodless product. Subtitled “A Dragon Tattoo Story,” it exists almost solely to drive a stake in the ground for the further franchising of author Stieg Larsson’s “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.”
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    Boy Erased is strongest when it simply focuses on Jared as he copes with the trauma of coming out in a repressed society. This includes, in the film’s most shocking scene, a sequence of collegiate gay rape that leaves the boy with PTSD, which goes unnoticed and untreated by parents, authorities, and, to some extent, the film itself.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    The stone-faced silent comedian’s influence on every possible aspect of physical comedy is wide and deep, attested to in this movie by entertainers old (Bill Irwin, Paul Dooley, Richard Lewis), ancient (Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner), youngish (Bill Hader, Quentin Tarantino), and random (Cybill Shepherd, Werner Herzog).
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    All in all, the movie’s a muddled and overlong experience, one that every so often drifts into dull, unintentional camp.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    When art-minded film directors stoop to genre-minded filmmaking, it’s generally a good idea to duck. Despite sequences that may lodge in your memory forever, Luca Guadagnino’s Suspiria is no exception to this rule.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    In addition to its other strengths — serving as a reminder of the kind of small, satisfying movie they don’t make anymore, showcasing the depths of Melissa McCarthy’s talents — Can You Ever Forgive Me? celebrates a hardy but endangered species: the Nasty New Yorker. It’s been a while since I’ve enjoyed spending so much time with someone so unpleasant.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    Can a vastly talented cast raise a heartfelt but banal screenplay on their own? The verdict is mixed, to put it kindly.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Ty Burr
    It’s an earnest and compassionate treatment of a story that is, by necessity, grueling as hell. It’s graced with sincere performances by Steve Carell (as David) and Timothée Chalamet (as Nic) that strive to steer clear of Actorly Moments. And there are mysteries here — of parenting, of human experience — that director Felix Van Groeningen looks at sharply before looking away.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    As franchise reboots go, the new Halloween is top shelf. Jamie Lee Curtis returns with a vengeance to the role of Laurie Strode.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    First Man plays a different and arguably more rewarding game, one that looks for the man behind the hero. It’s a movie that shows how the most personal moments can coexist within and alongside the most momentous events. It’s a film that insists history is made from private lives.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Mostly, though, the movie succeeds because of the actress at its center.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Ty Burr
    Venom, the movie, is a reptilian Marvel mishmash whose touch saps the life force of almost everyone in it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    On the basis of The Sisters Brothers, we’d all be better off handing our westerns to Frenchmen. Especially if the results do right by John C. Reilly. That fine, ursine character actor — our generation’s Wallace Beery, as I live and breathe — is one of the four corners of the movie’s acting pleasures, the other three being Joaquin Phoenix, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Riz Ahmed (HBO’s “The Night Of”).
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    A modern comedy-drama in the Woody Allen-Noah Baumbach mold — urban intellectuals talking their lives in circles — but what keeps it from being a live-action New Yorker cartoon is the heart beating away in the script and the performances. At over two hours, it’s long but it’s true.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    The latest update, directed by Cooper and built on the sturdy bones of William Wellman’s and Robert Carson’s 1937 script, has heart, soul, and sinew. Above all, it has Lady Gaga, both before and after her character’s transformation from an outer-borough duckling into a superstar swan.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ty Burr
    Most refreshingly, Science Fair illustrates the many different kinds of STEM students out there.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Ty Burr
    Broad as the side of a city bus and about as lumbering, Night School is a better-than-average Kevin Hart comedy — meaning that it’s an average comedy overall. It’s silly and rather sweet, and it’s blessed with an ensemble that makes the most of the dopey cartoon script patched together by Hart and five other writers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Ty Burr
    Hal
    Hal is a soft-edged memorial that should direct you, or re-direct you, to some terrific and tough-edged films.

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