Universal Pictures | Release Date: February 28, 2020
6.9
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Generally favorable reviews based on 241 Ratings
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Mixed:
33
Negative:
35
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6
duckhostMar 8, 2020
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. ATTENTION SPOILERS AHEAD.
The more that I think about this movie the more I get excited and disappointed about it. This movie has some structural plot holes that just cannot go unnoticed for example why didn't the cop did something about Adrian "faking" his death, even after he was supposedly kidnapped). Why didn't Cecilia told her sister and to her cop friend about Adrian's cellphone that she found on her **** attick weeks after Adrian was dead? The trailers tell another story, I thought it was going to be a thriller about a damaged person from all those years of abuse. Maybe she had schizophrenia, maybe it was all inside her head but NOPE, man bad wears an invisible cape suit. At this point, I lost all interest. The acting is SOLID especially on Moss part and the soundtrack thank god isn't used just to "enhance" the jumpscares. I really liked parts of this movie but really hated some and I don't know, you should watch it and see it for yourself.
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3 of 6 users found this helpful33
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6
muldjordMar 2, 2020
First part, fantastic! About half-way it starts to move towards being ridiculous. And the ending was just not very compelling to me.

Great acting by Moss though. She carries the movie. And it does have some genuinely scary parts. It's like a
First part, fantastic! About half-way it starts to move towards being ridiculous. And the ending was just not very compelling to me.

Great acting by Moss though. She carries the movie. And it does have some genuinely scary parts. It's like a ghost movie basically - until it's not. Which is where it stops working in my opinion. A few scenes fall apart completely when stuff happens that just makes no sense. Adrian is super lucky, all. the. time. So much so that it becomes annoying later on in the film.
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1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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6
aynksMar 2, 2020
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Whannell's directing experience with The Invisible Man provides a riveting horror plot that still leaves questions towards some of the decision-making that transpires throughout the movie. Overall, there are areas I really enjoy but also dislike. It is hard to grade this one, not going to lie. I just find myself viewing this movie as "mediocre" with potential to be something greater.

First off, the plot was great. I really enjoyed the thriller/horror experience with such a foggy perspective of Cecilia's mind from the start. You know something is wrong with her mentally, but it keeps getting worse or clearer as the movie continues. I thought the ending was bland, but understood the mindset behind it. With the amount of intensity that the entire movie provided, I just believe it could have offered more for the ending scene (although, the death scene was insane... in a good way).

Cast was fantastic, I really believed everyone did their job well with their respected roles. One issue I did have with the cast was Moss's character as Cecilia. There were some cases where I just believed it was hard to watch her act. The dinner scene with her sister was crazy, but I think her state was too altered to switch from normal to insane every 5 seconds. Do not find it realistic as well. There were times her acting also reminded me of Jordan Peele's "Us" movie once her cloned killed her. It was that kind of insanity I did not want to see, but it seemed to show up in some cases which was not what was intended for her character in my opinion.

I was split on some of the special effects. Although I understand the complications that come from fighting something invisible, it sometimes just turned funny rather than scary watching them fight the invisible man. Overall, it was not bad, but not super good.

One main problem I have with this movie is the amount of things that do not make sense. From the beginning there were many scenes that just provided no significance or common sense to the overall film and it definitely is the main reason why I gave this a 6.5/10. Cecilia cutting her wrist and surviving without bleeding out after a 15+ minute scene. The Invisible Man seemingly surviving almost every blunt force that comes at him expect the bullets at the end. The Invisible Man was essentially a superhero with that costume, almost killing everyone with a single hit. Also, what is the significance to the cameras on the costume? What is the significance of the money if he was going to take it away anyways? Why did they never check security footage at the dinner with her sister? Is the Invisible Man omnipresent (he gets places sooooooo fast)? There are many questions that ultimately leave me baffled with this movie. They could have provided more realism to it and it did not seem to offer that when I saw it.

I would recommend seeing it. I believe it is a "love it or ya hate it" kind of film. Won't see it again though.
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1 of 2 users found this helpful11
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5
MarkHReviewsMar 5, 2020
Over the past few years, Blumhouse Productions has become a money machine, offering low-budget, pulpy horror films (the “Purge” series, “Truth or Dare,” “Happy Death Day,” among others) that do very well at the box office. In fairness,Over the past few years, Blumhouse Productions has become a money machine, offering low-budget, pulpy horror films (the “Purge” series, “Truth or Dare,” “Happy Death Day,” among others) that do very well at the box office. In fairness, they’ve also bankrolled serious theatrical efforts like “Get Out” and “BlacKkKlansman.” “The Invisible Man” moves Blumhouse outside the traditional horror genre. It’s a film that is part horror film, part action movie, part support for #MeToo.

The concept behind this film originated with the 1897 novella “The Invisible Man” by H.G. Wells, generally acknowledged as the father of science fiction. This film also owes a debt to the 1933 film with the same name, starring Claude Rains.

In the hands of Writer/Director Leigh Whannell (the “Saw” series), the content and focus of this movie is changed dramatically from the original source material. In fact, the man we sometimes can’t see is actually only a tangential character in the story. The protagonist is Cecelia Kass (Elisabeth Moss), the long-suffering live-in partner of a rich genius who works in field of optics. A total control freak, the optics inventor has abused Cecelia in every way imaginable. After escaping from the fenced-in fortress where she lives with this madman, Cecelia is further persecuted by a series of mysterious events. Her former boyfriend has donned a body suit that refracts light, rendering him invisible as he performs a series of increasingly horrific misdeeds. Blood flows. Cecelia is accused of madness and murder. The game is afoot, Watson.

What makes this film rise about the typical Blumhouse dreck is Elisabeth Moss, who has had memorable roles in several iconic TV series including “West Wing,” “Mad Men,” “Top of the Lake,” and most recently “The Handmaid’s Tale.” Here, Moss offers an acting tour de force. Her character evolves from terrorized abuse victim to action figure to cold-blooded avenging angel. As her character transforms, Moss’ facial expressions and body language also evolve strikingly. If you can get past all the blood, it’s an evolution worth watching.

Because this is Blumhouse, who gave us masterpieces such as “The Gallows Act II” (a record-tying 0% on Rotten Tomatoes) and the currently-playing “Fantasy Island” (checking in at 9%), effective plotting is not a strong point in “The Invisible Man.” For example, while housed on a secure psychiatric ward, Cecelia simply opens the unlocked door to the stairwell, helpfully labelled “Emergency Exit,” to make her escape. Some of the plot twists made me yearn for the GEICO commercial with the immortal line, “Let’s hide behind the chain saws!”

“The Invisible Man” is a worthy addition to the pulp noir genre. With no particular skills, Moss’ character overcomes impossible odds to preserve her sanity and right wrongs. Along the way, the cinematography is notably flashy and fascinating. However, it’s Moss, and Moss alone, who elevates this film and makes the whole endeavor worthwhile.
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1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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5
plisken_snakeMar 2, 2020
The first 2/3 of the movie were incredible but that last act really ruined it for me. The first 2/3 are really well acted and are shot great forcing the audience to question everything they are looking at, though they do ruin some greatThe first 2/3 of the movie were incredible but that last act really ruined it for me. The first 2/3 are really well acted and are shot great forcing the audience to question everything they are looking at, though they do ruin some great scares by adding in loud jump scare noises in post but for the most part if the movie had have ended at the end of the 2nd act i would have rated this an 8/10 but for me the ending was so bad it just took me out of the movie due to a couple bad and predictable twists, dumb characters and it ditches the cinematography of the first 2 acts, which makes sense in context but it was still disappointing to me. I would still recommend this but I was disappointed. Expand
1 of 3 users found this helpful12
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4
JLuis_001Feb 29, 2020
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Better call it ''The Predictable Man''

It's funny that nowadays a normal and notorious complaint about the horror genre is that it relies too much on the jump scares, so it's surprising that this film is receiving so many good reviews considering that it's completely based on jump scares.

This is called The Invisible Man, therefore you're fully aware that what is chasing the main character is invisible, so all the scenes in which he's supposed to be stalking the victim, you know he's there somewhere. Thus what you're waiting is for him to do something. You as a viewer are waiting for the jump scare, so because of that the tension has gone out the window.
I cannot understand how people can say the genre lacks originality and then after seeing it they come and say is great.

The film is full of plot holes, devastating plot holes. Don't even talk about the cliches and it's a shame but considering the story tried to turn around by focusing on the abuse of women, Whannell cannot avoid falling into the same mistakes over and over again, showing completely repetitive situations.
Instead of deepening the abuse and mental harassment, the film resorts to the same topics as the protagonist is unable to make the people around her believe what is happening and that's the limitation the horror genre imposes over the story.

You just have to look at the scene where her sister is killed because is just ridiculous. No cameras in the restaurant and no smartphone from any of the diners in a full restaurant that could record or take a picture of a strange floating knife. Absurd.

And although the invisible suit is crazy, at least you can believe it because after all the film is based on that but what I thought was disastrous is that the suit apparently gives super powers to the wearer. When the guy gets rid of all the guards in the hallway the brute force of his punches is unbelievable, all the guards seemed to be hit with concrete. What more can I say?

Elisabeth Moss delivers but the script barely helps her and that frankly at the end of it all is the structural failure of this film, which depends totally on how gullible you are for it to work.
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2 of 9 users found this helpful27
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5
foxgroveMar 14, 2020
All the more disappointing for being surprisingly slow. A couple of shock tactics work very well and things liven up towards the end even if one can see the intended twist coming a mile off. Sound and music are impressive, but special effectsAll the more disappointing for being surprisingly slow. A couple of shock tactics work very well and things liven up towards the end even if one can see the intended twist coming a mile off. Sound and music are impressive, but special effects are kept to a minimum. The whole movie is somewhat redeemed by the excellent Elisabeth Moss who dives into her character with a resilient determination of which the film itself is unworthy. Expand
0 of 1 users found this helpful01
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4
radixlecti84Mar 21, 2020
Slow paced and boring re-hash of what we have seen before, the movie explores in depth the effects and fallout of spousal abuse and the main actress does a fine job of conveying this.

This movie sort of plods along at a snails pace and ramps
Slow paced and boring re-hash of what we have seen before, the movie explores in depth the effects and fallout of spousal abuse and the main actress does a fine job of conveying this.

This movie sort of plods along at a snails pace and ramps up for a fairly strong final act. My main complaints are with the pacing that I personally feel the whole "Evil Man v Victimized Woman" plot has been played out enough by hollywood in recent years, i'm frankly exhausted by it.
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0 of 2 users found this helpful02
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4
Bertaut1Mar 13, 2020
Starts brilliantly but ultimately undermines itself with plot contrivances and genre foolishness

H.G. Wells's original The Invisible Man (1897) suggests that rather than something as powerful as invisibility being used for the betterment of
Starts brilliantly but ultimately undermines itself with plot contrivances and genre foolishness

H.G. Wells's original The Invisible Man (1897) suggests that rather than something as powerful as invisibility being used for the betterment of mankind, it would instead be used to fulfil private desires, ultimately leading to the moral corruption of otherwise good men. However, despite the centrality of this theme in the core story, reframing the template as a tale of domestic abuse and PTSD, as happens in this latest adaptation, which focuses not on the male scientist but on a female victim of his, is a fascinating idea. But fascination only gets you so far, and what could have been an insightful film eventually proves itself incapable of using issues of domestic abuse as anything other than plot points to get from one predictable scare to the next.

The film begins as Cecilia (Elisabeth Moss) is putting into motion a plan to leave her domineering and abusive boyfriend, Adrian (Oliver Jackson-Cohen), a wealthy pioneer in optics. Having drugged him, she leaves their high-tech home in the middle of the night and is picked up nearby by her sister Emily (Harriet Dyer). Although assured that Adrian can't find her, Cecilia is suffers from agoraphobia and paranoia until Adrian commits suicide. Contacted by his brother Tom (Michael Dorman), who's handling his estate, Cecilia learns that Adrian has left her $5 million. However, despite her best efforts to move on, she just can't shake the feeling that Adrian is still around, watching her, sometimes even in the same room as her.

Written and directed by Leigh Whannell, this latest adaptation of Wells's original is not actually about the invisible man. Indeed, short of a background shot of him lying in bed, a shot showing only his torso as he runs through a forest, and a close-up of his hand, actor Oliver Jackson-Cohen doesn't even appear on screen prior to his apparent suicide. Adrian is not only the invisible man of the plot, so too is his character ideologically invisible. Which makes its own statement, and it's a statement worth making – men like him don't need to be present to continue to cause harm. In this sense, at least initially, the film is more concerned with the fear Adrian has instilled in Cecilia. Along the same lines, it looks at issues of how women who accuse powerful men of gaslighting are often ignored or disbelieved.

Aesthetically, the film looks terrific, particularly Stefan Duscio's cinematography, into which is built Cecilia's paranoia. For example, countless scenes involve the camera panning away from her, moving across the room, showing us nothing at all, and then panning back. Ordinarily, this would be textbook unmotivated camera movement, but here it conveys how Cecelia fears there may be something in the corner to which we panned. There are also many shots which in another film would be awful framing; isolating Cecilia in the frame and filling up so much of the screen's real-estate with empty negative space. Except, again, in this film, such negative space has an ominousness not applicable to regular thrillers.

But, I had a lot of problems with this film. For one thing, we know from the get-go that Cecilia isn't imagining things, that Adrian faked his suicide and is now stalking her whilst invisible. Granted, this is kind of unavoidable given how well-known the property is, but had the film allowed for even a little bit of ambiguity, it could have done wonders for emotional complexity, turning a story about invisibility into a story possibly about mental collapse. Another thing that bothered me is that in a film so focused on surveillance and privacy, there are several scenes where if there is even one functioning CCTV camera, the movie ends. A pivotal scene in a restaurant is an especially egregious example of this – one grainy image from a camera, and Cecilia can prove she's not going nuts and the whole plot unravels.

However, my biggest problem is that what starts as a fascinating study of the lasting ramifications of domestic violence ultimately descends into genre stupidity. The fact that Whannell ultimately undermines himself in this way, deploying such important themes merely to get him to the gory dénouement, is especially frustrating insofar as he genuinely did originally seem to have some interesting things to say. Tied to this is that Adrian is introduced as such an abhorrent character from the start, void of nuance or subtlety. Domestic abusers aren't monotone evil-doers, oftentimes, they're very charming on the surface, and any film claiming to be a serious examination of this topic would make room to address this.

The Invisible Man left me disappointed and frustrated. Initially positioning itself as an allegory for the difficulty victims of domestic abuse have in moving on with their lives even after the abuser is gone, it eventually privileges genre beats and cheap thrills over emotional complexity.
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0 of 4 users found this helpful04
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6
Daniel_EndureFeb 28, 2020
"Dry" is the perfect word to describe The Invisible Man. No doubt, it has its moments, but unfortunately they're either over as fast as a snap of the fingers, or involve characters swinging at the air, ultimately depicting what looks like"Dry" is the perfect word to describe The Invisible Man. No doubt, it has its moments, but unfortunately they're either over as fast as a snap of the fingers, or involve characters swinging at the air, ultimately depicting what looks like them fighting off dust mites. Plus, there’s that cheap, less-than-stellar, Blumhouse feel throughout... Expand
0 of 6 users found this helpful06
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6
Stream2BigScreeMar 1, 2020
*heavy breathing in the background*

S2S: What is that sound?! Oh, wait it's just Trip Fontaine panicking over The Invisible Man. Relax Trip! Catch your breath! I know we both viewed this film this week, but it's over now. No one is following
*heavy breathing in the background*

S2S: What is that sound?! Oh, wait it's just Trip Fontaine panicking over The Invisible Man. Relax Trip! Catch your breath! I know we both viewed this film this week, but it's over now. No one is following you. You're much better looking than Elisabeth Moss. No way her crazy husband would want to follow you when he could do much worse. Anyway, we saw the remake/current day adaptation of The Invisible Man.

Trip: Don't worry! I'm not scared. I'm never scared... except when Elisabeth Moss' crazy eyes are staring me down. So, yeah, I didn't, but should have, realized that this was an adaptation of H.G. Wells' The Invisible Man. That didn't entirely register with me until after the fact. Duh!

This The Invisible Man was written and directed by Leigh Whannell, and I'll call it a modern adaptation inspired by Wells' book. Elisabeth Moss plays Cecilia Kass, a woman who escapes a controlling relationship and her menacing, optics mogul beau, Adrian Griffin, played by Oliver Jackson-Cohen. Not to give too much away but Adrian commits suicide and Cecilia thinks he's haunting her or is she just crazy - hijinks ensue(See The Trailer).

To be honest, I walked into the theater knowing exactly what was going to happen. There was only one legitimate plot twist that surprised me. In fact, my jaw may still be on the floor from that. Otherwise, this movie was a paint-by-numbers psychological thriller. Characters, specifically Moss' Cecilia, make decisions that make absolutely no sense solely to further the story. Characters don't say things that make any sense and do say things that no one would ever say, which was very frustrating. The script is cliched and predictable; but, of course, The Invisible Man original was published in the 19th century and has been adapted many times over. I would have hoped that Whannell could have done something truly original with the psychological thriller.

Elisabeth Moss is generally good here. She has the face of a woman who is being terrorized. She's got these eyes that just bore into you. She does not need to do much to convincingly portray crazy, but she also is powerful. I do not fault Moss for the overall shortcomings of the movie. I'll also commend the design of Adrian Griffin's home. It is cold and angular, and exactly what you would expect of a rich, optics guys. The isolation and starkness of the surrounding echoes the relationship that haunts Cecilia.

S2S: More like she has a face that terrorizes...This is the only role she should play because it comes so naturally to her angular face. But that's neither here nor there... continue my friend.

Trip: *ignores comments* The visual effects are hit or miss. There is a fight sequence that seems either poorly edited or the visual effects are inconsistent.

S2S: I'd agree the visual effects were hit or miss. In fact, the visual effects were just as inconsistent as the escape plan given to us in the beginning. Yet, the effects also added a bunch to the cool aspects of action sequences and the intensity of anxiety. So what she flies across the kitchen as if he some how has superpowers and her head is independent from her body *sarcasm abounds*...

Trip: Well, even though The Invisible Man is hardly original and is fairly predictable, if you know that walking into the theater, is it worthy of a viewing? I would still say yes. There are jump scares that don’t feel entirely cheap. This is what you came for. As I stated before, there is one plot twist that is almost worth the price of admission itself. Ultimately, it is fun and satisfying – not scary, if that what you want, but thrilling nonetheless. I say worth a trip to the big screen with a popcorn to spill at those shocking moments.

S2S: I mean I generally agree with you but I think our readers deserve a little bit more. This movie is definitely a popcorn muncher but is it necessary to see on the big screen because of 2 good scenes? I think you can pass the movie theater ticket but you won’t be completely disappointed, if you did. This is at best a matinee movie but definitely a RedBox rental type of flick.
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0 of 4 users found this helpful04
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5
adolfosanchezgMar 1, 2020
Excelent !!! Terror and suspense exquisitly Made. Beautiful performances. I almost had a heartattack during the movie.
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6
JoeCoolMar 23, 2020
Decent enough thriller, though I wouldn't call it horror just because there's some blood in it. The acting of the lead is good, she sure knows how to do crazy. However the story is rather cliché with characters doing dumb things just toDecent enough thriller, though I wouldn't call it horror just because there's some blood in it. The acting of the lead is good, she sure knows how to do crazy. However the story is rather cliché with characters doing dumb things just to further the story along. The ending is sort of surprising but it also takes away the whole buildup if one could call it that. But it managed to get my heart pumping faster than usual, so that's something, just not quite good enough to be recommended, just okay. Expand
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6
CalvinCrackFeb 29, 2020
This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Serviceable film, watchable film. Bogged down with cliches and doesn’t fully transcend its genre as it appeared eager to do at first. I was entertained moment to moment but baffled by the film’s logic. It fails to pass the test of: why don’t they just use cell phones and videos to solve these problems. Which gives the script a “written in the 90’s vibe” which is kind of how the movie feels (at its best) but it’s extremely modern in other ways, having major plot turns rely on email, uber and the suit’s futuristic technology. So where is the cell phone video? We’re talking about a story about a woman entirely out to prove that she’s being stalked by an invisible intruder and she doesn’t think to herself “I can film this to prove it.” If you can look past that sort of stuff, it’s a fine movie. If you can’t, it’ll feel more like a decent movie. Definitely not a bad movie though. Expand
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6
RobbyPMar 11, 2020
Decent movie full of good acting and terrific scenes of suspense. However, it falls prey to the horror trope of characters who make stupid, irrational decisions and could have shed about 20 minutes easily. Still, it was better than many ofDecent movie full of good acting and terrific scenes of suspense. However, it falls prey to the horror trope of characters who make stupid, irrational decisions and could have shed about 20 minutes easily. Still, it was better than many of the horror flicks I've seen recently and was pretty good at speeding up the heart-rate. Expand
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6
MayfieldjaMar 18, 2020
The Invisible Man (2020) gives us a solid performance from Elisabeth Moss and is unsettling and uncomfortable as it dives into very tangible themes. However, it still has flaws, mainly in scenes where we encounter the titular character. 6The Invisible Man (2020) gives us a solid performance from Elisabeth Moss and is unsettling and uncomfortable as it dives into very tangible themes. However, it still has flaws, mainly in scenes where we encounter the titular character. 6 out of 10.

-SM
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6
theredskyMar 1, 2020
I was genuinely surprised that a horror movie like this early in 2020 didn’t suck. Most studios just throw out really bad horror movies in January and February just to get rid of them. The Invisible Man is the rare exception. While a had aI was genuinely surprised that a horror movie like this early in 2020 didn’t suck. Most studios just throw out really bad horror movies in January and February just to get rid of them. The Invisible Man is the rare exception. While a had a lot of issues with the film, it still was a very solid effort and did the one thing a horror movie should do, be scary. The film’s biggest trait is that it does not rely on cheap jumpscares. It instead relies on a natural build up of tension that pays off with an interesting and unique scare. The film also doesn’t continuously use the same type of scare. Some horror movies will continuously use the scary face trope to get a reaction but The Invisible Man doesn’t. Each scare is unique in its own way. I won’t spoil any of them because they are quite creepy and need to be seen and not explained. Elisabeth Moss does a great job in this film. She is able to communicate this sense of loneliness while being surrounded by everyone and was able to convey the emotions of fear, sadness, and joy in a natural yet intentionally creepy way. The rest of the cast does a fine job but really don’t compare to Moss. The only thing holding her performance from being top notch is the screenplay. Some of the lines of dialogue were very awkward and took away from some scenes because of how corny or lame they were. That didn’t happen throughout the whole movie but when it did, it was noticeable. The rest of the film’s technical aspects were pretty good. The direction from Leigh Whannell was unique and interesting and the cinematography was pretty great. Each shot was visually interesting and had something to offer. The way they shot some of the scenes was great. Exchanges were shot from many different points of view and the camera was able to spin around and follow characters exact movements during action sequences. One technical aspect I took issue with was the score. While the actual composition of the music was good, the repetitiveness of it was a little irritating. The film kept using the same song for more intense scenes and it got distracting after a while. It didn’t delve into different ways to use music for scenes with high amounts of tension and I really wish it had done that. The film also has a lot of plot inconsistencies and dumb character decisions. One such inconsistency that isn’t spoiler related is when a car crashes. The front of the car is really banged up but it’s shown less than a minute later and it’s completely fixed. Overall, The Invisible Man is a mostly smart horror movie with a great lead performance, story, direction, and cinematography but is almost undermined by a weak screenplay, plot inconsistencies, and dumb character decisions. Expand
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4
SinewsApr 6, 2020
Despite its clever cinematography, The Invisible Man is an overly-lengthy slog with far too many needless, unwarranted plot diversions, likely there for the sake of covering up its greatest shame - it lacks a soul.
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