Nintendo Insider's Scores

  • Games
For 713 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Ori and the Blind Forest: Definitive Edition
Lowest review score: 10 Woodle Tree Adventures Deluxe
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 38 out of 713
717 game reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Persona 3 Portable, as a game, is incredible and this revisit has made me realize how much it means to me. I get the disappointment, I do, but as a modern version, I think it holds up alright. This game deserves better, and I think if the backgrounds weren’t sticking out like a sore thumb this would be a glowing recommendation. As of now I can really just say that if you play this on Nintendo Switch you’re in for a good time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite faltering in its plot delivery and the absence of meaningful decision-making, Fire Emblem Engage once again allows Intelligent Systems to demonstrate its unparalleled strategic brilliance and unquestionable dominance in the genre. It isn’t a game that is lacking in heroic ambition, in many ways evolving its own formula triumphantly beyond what was achieved with Fire Emblem: Three Houses but otherwise disappointingly falling short in others.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Jupiter takes an interesting swing with Picross X: Picbits Vs Uzboross, its blend of level-based gameplay, skills and snappy puzzles a refreshing alternative to the slower-paced affairs seen in its other efforts. While some may find its smaller grids limiting compared to those games, what it does instead presents a whole new take on the formula and one that excites me for what the developer may and can do next.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite any gripes about the performance, I really think that this generation gets a lot of things right and I feel confident in future games if they continue in this direction. The battles are as good now as they were in Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue all those years ago, and somehow capturing Pokémon has become even more addicting. The ability to tackle what you want to do first and in which order to do them is a great addition to the formula. Pokémon was always destined to become a fully open-world game at some point, and Pokémon Scarlet and Pokémon Violet demonstrate a very good effort to achieve just that.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite any gripes about the performance, I really think that this generation gets a lot of things right and I feel confident in future games if they continue in this direction. The battles are as good now as they were in Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue all those years ago, and somehow capturing Pokémon has become even more addicting. The ability to tackle what you want to do first and in which order to do them is a great addition to the formula. Pokémon was always destined to become a fully open-world game at some point, and Pokémon Scarlet and Pokémon Violet demonstrate a very good effort to achieve just that.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I think SaGa Scarlet Grace: Ambitions is, by all normal means, still the series’ peak in terms of “quality.” I think it’s the better game, and might even be a better recommendation for your first SaGa game. Romancing SaGa: Minstrel Song Remastered sings to me in a way that game just can’t compare. Maybe it’s the PS2 design sensibilities, perhaps it’s the chibi models, or maybe it’s the music. I can’t quantify it, but I think depending on the person this is one of those games that will stick with you for life. This seemingly tiny package has so much meat and is one I just want to keep revisiting for years to come. It doesn’t hold your hand but instead beckons you to plunge into its depths and uncover its secrets. You’ll drown in systems that often feel like they’d never work together, but it all just does. There’s beauty in the chaos, if you embrace it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I’ve always loved Crisis Core, it’s a foundational kind of game I remember fondly from my youth. It came out at just the right time, born during the dawn of the now thriving YouTube generation of millennials, featured proudly in Windows Movie Maker AMVs and cutscene compilations. Make no mistake, my enjoyment in Crisis Core is far from ironic or “cringe” that many might associate with those. It’s common to reflect back on that era negatively, but to me, Crisis Core represents the pure innocence of youth and the earnest mistakes associated with it. Zack’s story is so endearing and captured the attention of so many teenagers across the world for a reason. We got to see someone struggle to stay afloat in a system far larger than himself and do his best to keep his innocence intact. As I played this on my Nintendo Switch, I felt sent right back to that part of my life. I even got the urge to play it under my covers late at night as if to hide from parents I no longer live with. Repackaging those feelings, and cutting as much of the bloat as possible is commendable. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII Reunion strives to be the experience we remember, rising above the game we actually got.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I love visual novels, and I love strategy games. For a subsection of gamers, Digimon Survive will hit the perfect sweet spot between both of those. It’s got everything you’d expect from a digestible entry with a focus on presentation. However, I couldn’t help but feel that the game is just shy of greatness. Make no mistake, Digimon Survive is good. However, despite its best efforts, I found that the pacing drags and the combat mechanics are unremarkable. If you have enough patience to engage with its story and gameplay, the positives will far outweigh the negatives. It’s flawed, but the heart shines through and it goes down easy thanks to being one of the best-looking anime-style games released in years. Are there better SRPGs to play right now? Sure, but none offer Digimon’s unique brand of SRPG and I think it hits more than it misses.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Stanley Parable: Ultra Deluxe is a good update to an already great game. If you have never played this before, now is your chance to experience a truly unique and brilliantly clever game. If you have played the original version before, there is enough new content here to keep you entertained. Just don’t read too much about it before heading in.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Sonic the Hedgehog series has never been one too timid to try out something new and while those experiments have varied wildly in quality over the years between the excellence of Generations and Colours to the miserable Sonic ’06 and Boom, you can chalk Sonic Frontiers up in the former group. Rough around the edges and disappointing in more than one area but an exciting new direction for SEGA’s blue mascot nonetheless, one that Sonic Team would be smart to stick with and refine and explore further.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, The Jackbox Party Pack 9 is an entertaining package offering decent variation between its five games. Even with the one misfire, there’s plenty of fun still to be had sorting, lying, selling trash and… communicating range through words and images. Nine games in and Jackbox Games has once again proven there are still some decent ideas left in the tank.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    PlatinumGames has delivered one of the greatest action games ever made. Bayonetta’s most spellbinding witching hour yet represents not only the series at its climactic best but an ever-heightened benchmark of what the developer has looked to achieve within the genre. This Game of the Year contender comes out with its stiletto-heel guns blazing for an unpredictable thrill-a-minute spectacle that I never wanted to end. There’s nothing else like it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn’t without its missteps, but, on the whole, Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope can be seen as a triumph of galactic proportions. Bolder and more daring in its vision for the unexpected collision of its Heroes compared with the original game, it is in the exploration of its planets and the cosmic-powered combat system that underpin what amounts to an exceptional experience. It may perhaps be lacking the heart of its predecessor, but it certainly isn’t short on heroics.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Picross S games aren’t exactly known for reinventing the wheel but Picross S8 is arguably the most straightforward entry so far. Having the option to play with a team of four is certainly an interesting addition but, other than that, you’re looking at yet another safe but reliably fun episode of Picross.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I adore both of these games, and if you have the stomach for their contents I think they could be as formative to you as they were for me. They’re thought-provoking and beautiful games that spoke to me in a time when I needed them. But the issues introduced with these official Nintendo Switch releases make it hard to give them a glowing recommendation as they are now. Some of these problems, like Chaos;Head not having speaker tags, aren’t really something that could be fixed. I get it, but there are strange oversights I think could be addressed in a patch. Will they be? I’m not entirely sure. What I do know is that these games are great at their core, and deserve better.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In all fairness, the online mode is just a box to tick against something that Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Cowabunga Collection doesn’t need. The real hook is that this particular series is something we don’t see packaged together very often – an omnibus of memories, specially tailored for fans and friends alike, who were once touched by the games and the franchise at its peak. I was lucky enough to be one of those kids, and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Cowabunga Collection is, without doubt, one of the most nostalgic compilations I have ever had the pleasure to experience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Pac-Man World Re-Pac is a decent little platformer albeit a rather straightforward one. Its combination of old-school Pac-Man grid-based gameplay and linear but varied worlds are entertaining enough to get you through its 10 or so hour adventure, but the rather plain level design and occasionally clunky movement also reveal a game limited by its original PlayStation roots.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl are faithful remakes of the 2006 Nintendo DS games. They probably lean too much on the safe side, not achieving an awful lot to improve on the originals other than a few quality-of-life improvements. The improved Underground sections are a welcome addition, but the missing features from Pokémon Platinum are a big let-down. All in all, though, the Sinnoh region offers just as brilliant of an adventure as it was 15 years ago and the formula that worked back then (and then some) is still as addictive to this day. If you are a fan of classic Pokémon titles, this is a no-brainer.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl are faithful remakes of the 2006 Nintendo DS games. They probably lean too much on the safe side, not achieving an awful lot to improve on the originals other than a few quality-of-life improvements. The improved Underground sections are a welcome addition, but the missing features from Pokémon Platinum are a big let-down. All in all, though, the Sinnoh region offers just as brilliant of an adventure as it was 15 years ago and the formula that worked back then (and then some) is still as addictive to this day. If you are a fan of classic Pokémon titles, this is a no-brainer.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There’s still no other game that delivers as refreshing a multiplayer experience quite like Splatoon effortlessly achieves. It feels just as fresh now as it first did back on Wii U, and, while more of the same isn’t necessarily bad when the series’ remains consistently brilliant, new weapons, stages and Boss Salmonid can only freshen up and re-energise the game’s multiplayer modes so far. However, what’s here has been tinkered with and refined to near perfection. Inkling and Octoling stalwarts will approach this threequel with a renewed sense of purpose in wanting to prove that they’re the freshest squid on the block, but it will be the content roadmap that inevitably determines whether Splatsville’s worth sticking around in.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The worst thing I can say about Blossom Tales 2: The Minotaur Prince, is that there are very few of the developer’s own ideas in the entire game. On the flip side of that, you could argue that because it is taking its inspiration from one of the greatest franchises of all time – and does a good job of replicating it – the quality of the game is very high. At no point during my entire playthrough, did I want to stop playing or feel like I wanted the game to end. The adventure was fun from beginning to end.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Funny, entertaining and charming, Kirby’s Dream Buffet is a delightful little package. Could it do with some more content? Sure. Is it odd you can’t play four-player split-screen? Definitely. But like the many delicious-looking treats it features, Kirby’s Dream Buffet is a short but ever so sweet time and something you’ll find yourself coming back to for one more bite.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As for Cuphead: The Delicious Last Course, it is a serving that was well worth the long wait. For the price of a meal deal at a tacky fast-food restaurant, you are getting a gourmet dish that is unlikely to leave you feeling bloated.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I don’t think the Klonoa Phantasy Reverie Series is a perfect collection, especially on Nintendo Switch, but it’s a solid version of two excellent games. If you get this on another platform, I’d probably recommend it without any hesitation for newcomers looking to experience Klonoa for the first time. Despite being announced during a Nintendo Direct, the Switch version of this is rather subpar. This is a solid remaster of two of the best classic platformers you can find on the market, that would, unfortunately, be best played elsewhere. At least it’s nice to see that Klonoa is back!
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, Capcom Fighting Collection is a very welcome addition to anyone who enjoys stockpiling retro classics for the Nintendo Switch. Many of the games on the list may not be the most famous entries when it comes to Capcom’s back catalogue, but that doesn’t mean that they are any less fun or important. The visuals, sound and gameplay mechanics across the board are still as beautiful and interestingly presented today as they ever were. Furthermore, Capcom Fighting Collection sets a firm reminder of classic Capcom’s creativity at its best.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What Monolith Soft has achieved with Xenoblade Chronicles 3 went far beyond my expectations. The developer’s masterful approach to character development and world-building results in an unforgettable adventure that is set in a world that is just as remarkable to explore. It is the emotional storytelling that makes it an unmissable journey that’s worth undertaking, elevating the experience to not only be considered as a Game of the Year contender but an all-time classic that will be remembered for decades to come.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pac-Man Museum+ is certainly a welcome addition to join the robust army of retro collections now available for the Nintendo Switch. Not every game is necessarily a hit, but they are all still part of a legacy that was certainly vital in shaping the future of video games.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I’ll admit, this was an incredibly subversive game for its era, one that might not hit as well as it did for some compared to me. I’m able to appreciate it as both a game from the ’90s and just a game. But I’m sure a lot of creatives in Japan were inspired by this, and those inspirations had to have bled into their work. You will have likely seen parts of its unique twists on the genres it plays with elsewhere, but I found that to be an endearing trait. It feels fitting that a compilation of clear passion and inspiration has trickled down to other games. The impact of Live A Live has seemingly never gone away, and that’s beautiful.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s little denying the quality of the four adventures found in Sonic Origins – arguably the best the hedgehog has ever seen in some cases – and there’s clearly a lot of effort that’s gone into this package, however, it’s also one peppered with weird omissions and a general lack of content that prevent it from reaching true excellence. It’s great there’s now another way to play these classics on modern consoles but as a Sonic fan myself I just wished for more and better in a collection celebrating the blue blur.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There are those times you just know you’re onto something truly special, a game that when you aren’t playing, you’re thinking about playing. Wondering where your next session may lead or what the story might reveal. Neon White is one of said games, an experience that’s always exciting, often amusing and never a dull moment. Easily one of the best and most electrifying releases of 2022.

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