Nintendo Life's Scores

  • Games
For 4,082 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 20% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds
Lowest review score: 10 Space Trek
Score distribution:
4085 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The obvious question when reviewing The TakeOver is how it compares to Streets of Rage 4, and we're pleased to report that it's just as worthy of your time as money, even if it lacks online play and some of the extra polish that DotEmu, Lizardcube and Guard Crush Games' title possesses. Some players will no doubt take issue with the CG-style sprites, but every other aspect of this package feels spot-on and we especially appreciate the two bonus stages, which feel like love letters to other Sega classics. The TakeOver offers an engaging and addictive alternative to Streets of Rage 4, and any self-respecting fan of the side-scrolling fighting genre shouldn't hesitate to pick up both.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mortal Kombat 11 finally realised a true Mortal Kombat experience on Nintendo hardware, and with Mortal Kombat 11: Aftermath, Nintendo Switch players get to experience this full expansion in all its glory. The five-chapter-long Story mode isn’t essential, but it does a nice job of weaving the non-third-party DLC characters into the narrative, with Shang Tsung still managing to steal the show. The three additions to the roster certainly won’t set it alight, but Fujin alone does bring a few dimensions to the party. It’s a fun expansion, but the asking price is still a little too high at launch.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In many ways, it feels like Shantae and the Seven Sirens is the culmination of everything WayForward has learned since that initial release a little less than two decades back. Shantae and the Seven Sirens pulls some of the best elements from the titles that came before it – such as the dungeons and fast transformations – while adding in several cool new ones too, like the collectable cards and lovable new characters. A short but sweet runtime, well-drawn visuals, a catchy soundtrack and a well-designed map make this one an easy recommendation to anybody looking for the next must-have Metroidvania for their Switch.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The most difficult part of reviewing Sky Racket is knowing which audience is going to be the most interested in the game. As mentioned before, while the boss fights are fun and full of stuff to dodge, the block sections of the game may be too slow-paced for the more dedicated shmup fans. With that being said, it is also possible that the people looking for a relaxing experience of Tennis and Break-Out might be taken off guard by the more demanding boss fights. Perhaps the safest conclusion, then, is that the game should appeal to an audience that has an overlapping interest in the diverse game-styles that Sky Racket skillfully mixes together.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Simply put, there’s almost nothing one can reasonably complain about with Xenoblade Chronicles: Definitive Edition. What we have here is an already excellent JRPG that has been improved in nearly every conceivable way, short of a complete reimagining. On top of the fantastic story, enjoyable combat, and incredible world design, Monolith Soft has included an entirely new epilogue story arc while somehow improving upon and polishing up nearly everything in the base game, from progression systems to visuals to UI design. Xenoblade Chronicles: Definitive Edition is easily one of the greatest RPGs available on the Switch to date, and will no doubt stand the test of time. It goes without saying that if you were ever a fan of the original or of RPGs in general you absolutely must get this game for your collection as soon as you reasonably can. Even if you wouldn’t consider yourself a fan, we would still strongly encourage you to think about adding this one to your collection, as this is the standard against which most RPGs should be judged.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    If we sound like a broken record criticising this VR conversion, that's because its central problem is so all-encompassing that it destroys the product. Sure, you could have fun with this if you're a committed fan of Five Nights at Freddy's and its lore, but we'd advise against it otherwise. As with many VR games, the immersion and novelty factor papers over the cracks of the limited gameplay. When that escapism is taken away, all that's left is a sub-par minigame collection that isn't even as good as the individual games it cribs from – and it's a lot more expensive, too. We get the impression that the sole reason this game exists is to capitalise on the fact that the Switch has such a large market share.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Journey to the Savage Planet is a wonderfully unique mixture of No Man's Sky-style exploration and Metroidvania puzzling and platforming with a wonderfully dark sense of humour that arrives here on Switch in a slightly compromised but still eminently playable state. ARY-26 is a fantastically vibrant planet to explore, filled with cute creatures, bizarre flora and fauna and super-slick platforming and environmental puzzle design. The monolithic tower that sits at the middle of this alien planet is a compelling mystery to work towards and the game doles out plenty of fun new tools and toys at just the right rate to keep you highly entertained as you jump, grapple, boost and blast your way to the secret at its core. There have been obvious graphical concessions made and the framerate does wobble from time to time – performance definitely feels worse in docked than handheld – but overall Typhoon Games has created an adventure that's strong enough to transcend any of these slight technical shortcomings and absolutely remains an experience you should check out, if you get the chance.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Boss battles sprinkled throughout the game add a touch of variety, but the decision to only save your game after beating them means you'll be playing many stages in a row before you can quit, which isn't ideal. Of course you can just put your Switch into sleep mode, but if you want to dive in and play a handful of levels then hope back onto Astral Chain or something, that isn't an option. It's a bit of a strange choice, because in every other respect Pushy and Pully in Blockland is extremely friendly stuff.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Never Stop Sneakin' is a lovingly crafted parody of early Metal Gear Solid games that pairs some genuinely funny dialogue and ridiculous characters and cutscenes with its own brand of impressively slick stealth action. Its levels are pretty repetitive and there's quite a bit of unnecessary grinding and replaying of missions in an effort to artificially extend the running time but, overall, this is a fun little title that's perfect for dipping in and out of for a hit of light-hearted tactical espionage action.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At its core, Golf With Your Friends is still a decent golf game. Get an online multiplayer game going with some similarly-skilled pals and you’ll have a great time making your way through its weird and wonderful courses (don’t even get us started on the Worms course and the jetpacks you can get). Its main problem is that every time you change these optimum conditions – playing with strangers, playing offline, playing solo, playing with a mix of experts and beginners – you’re going to get diminishing returns from your experience. As long as you take the title literally, you'll have fun.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What it lacks in hyperrealism and officially-licensed teams, Super Mega Baseball 3 more than makes up for with a carefully adjusted set of physics that are deep enough to cater to RBI Baseball players while offering up the welcome addition of some improved modes. Franchise mode alone feels like a proper extension of the brand, with its irreverent sense of humour lending a welcome nuance to an otherwise content-heavy sports simulation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA Mega Mix is a strong portable version of a truly joyous rhythm game which loses out a little in terms of track numbers in comparison to the likes of series stablemate Future Tone, but makes up for this with a surprisingly solid Switch-exclusive motion control mode alongside touchscreen controls and a new art style that helps keep things running smoothly as you blast your way through its eclectic mix of excellent music. It's a perfect fit for dipping in and out of in handheld and is extremely welcoming to newcomers whilst still providing plenty of tough challenges for veteran rhythm game fans. If you're a follower of this particular genre, then Project DIVA Mega Mix comes highly recommended.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Given the presence of Thunder Force IV in the Sega Ages series, it’s fair to say that Thunder Force AC isn’t as big a novelty as other Sega Ages arcade games, like Virtua Racing or G-LOC. This doesn’t necessarily matter, though; it’s still one of the better shoot ‘em ups of its time, and the addition of a new mode aimed at less experienced players gives a much-appreciated entry point for gamers who’ve always been interested in the genre but felt intimidated by its generally high level of difficulty. Whether you’re a shmup fiend or a complete amateur, there’s fun to be had here.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Persistence is a unique and unsettling sci-fi horror roguelite that does an excellent job of transferring its tense atmosphere and absorbing gameplay loops from its original VR form to the Nintendo Switch. There are tons of weapons and toys to tool around with as you run the gauntlet, the permanent aspects of the gameplay are refreshingly generous and survival mode and New Game+ provide a properly stiff challenge for those who prefer their roguelites to be tough as nails. Firesprite Games has done a fantastic job of porting the entire ghoulish affair over to Switch, with flawless performance in both docked and handheld modes; overall, this is another very strong addition to the console's ever-expanding collection of excellent roguelite experiences.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Milestone’s two-wheeled efforts offer a more polished two-wheeled simulation experience, Kylotonn’s latest addition to the genre is still a recommended purchase for hardcore superbike superfans. The overall improvements to the handling model make taking on the legendary Isle of Man TT course a far more rewarding experience than previous attempts, while the improved Career mode makes the build-up to that infamous race far more agreeable to less experienced riders. While it’s still very rough around the edges in terms of presentation, Isle Of Man TT - Ride On The Edge 2 is still a far smoother ride than the original and another decent addition to Switch’s growing motorbike repertoire.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sparsely laid out, mechanically simplistic, and generally a bit of a bore to play, PONG Quest fails to do anything meaningful with this most neglected of gaming properties. The adventuring element is paper-thin, and even the game of bat-and-ball at the heart of its battle system feels flat and lifeless. As always with Pong, local multiplayer is your best bet for fun, but there's little that's fresh about that.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Satazius is the pick of the pack and almost worth the asking price in itself, but if you enjoy the shmup genre then Shmup Collection is a package that will keep on giving. There's nothing in the way of extras outside of each game's respective practice/stage select mode (and a "Tate" mode for Wolflame, for those with a Flip Grip), but you won't find yourself wanting. This is an impressive bundle of joy at a very competitive price. We just hope it'll be followed by a second instalment; Astro Port has a lot of awesome games in its catalogue and we'd love to see them find a second home on Switch.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What the Golf? is a sterling effort for Switch that has clearly had enormous amounts of love poured into it. Its aesthetic is a little bit indie-by-numbers but there's so much to see and do here that'll have you (and a friend) laughing out loud. It may not be the most difficult game in the world, but it's damn good fun, even if you don't like golf. Especially if you don't like golf, in fact.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Elder Scrolls: Blades is a bland and repetitive grind, a free-to-play mobile game all dressed up like a proper Elder Scrolls title but lacking in any of the adventure, exploration, wit or charm of a mainline entry in the franchise. Combat here is dull, levels are small and linear, town-building is boring and everything is designed to frustrate you into spending your money on the gems required to override the constant timers that impede your progress as you level up and make your way through the barely existent story. It's a free-to-play title so you won't lose anything (other than your time) by giving it a whirl, but we reckon you'll have had your fill of this one in pretty short order, and there are lots of much better freemium experiences available on Switch to spend your precious time on.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    80’s Overdrive may be wonderfully presented, but its problem is that price-wise it’s sandwiched between two similar games that are better. Sega Ages Out Run is cheaper and its tight controls remain impeccable today, while Horizon Chase Turbo may be double the price but is significantly superior in almost every notable way, including control, amount of content and sense of speed. If you absolutely need another ‘80s style racing game then this will keep you entertained for a few hours, but there are better alternatives.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thanks to some welcome changes to its core systems – mainly the improved battle mechanics and the great onus on story content – Naruto Shippuden: Ultimate Ninja Storm 4 Road to Boruto is the most accomplished and enjoyable instalment in the series yet. While it’s certainly more for the hardcore Naruto crowd, it’s nevertheless a meaty package with an impressively vast roster, a huge amount of unlockable content and the addition of the film-tie in for the Baruto storyline. If you love all things Naruto, this fourth instalment is a must-have addition to your ninja collection.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Marrying astonishing spectacle and overwrought drama, The Wonderful 101: Remastered is one of the most memorable action games you’ll ever play. Its delirious excesses come with a price, and it’s one that’s at little harder to forgive this time, with the original’s flaws remaining untouched, and a few compromises made to accommodate the Wii U version’s dual-screen set-pieces. But for all its minor frustrations, it’s a game that rewards patience and perseverance. Grit your teeth through its control quirks and camera foibles and relish the giddy spectacle of a game that doesn’t know when to stop.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It really sucks having to rate Munch's Oddysee so low – this version has obviously been made with care, but as the old saying goes you just can't polish a... well... you know. There are a handful of moments where things come together to a limited extent and the Oddworld magic show signs of life, but it's always been the ugly stepchild of the series and the already-on-Switch follow-up was a brilliant return to form – we hope that the existence of Munch's Oddysee on this format is a matter of simply getting it out of the way before a re-release of the much n better Oddworld: New n' Tasty and the upcoming Oddworld: Soulstorm.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you’re looking for a retro shooter that isn’t actually a 25-year-old port of a N64 game, then Ion Fury is the time-travelling love letter from the past you’ve been waiting for. While its weapons and boss fights won’t leave much of an imprint on your memory, the speed and intensity of its gunfights and the intricacy of its level designs more than make up for it. If you want to be punished and rewarded by the shooter principles of old, this is the new/old FPS for you.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Void Bastards is a delightful roguelike romp through a wonderfully unique cel-shaded comic book world full of loud-mouthed enemies and smart-arsed robots. The core combat is straightforward stuff, but it's given plenty of extra bite through the fantastically evocative graphics and kept interesting with hackable turrets and a handful of other BioShock-esque elements that give your engagements with the many Screws, Juves, Tourists and Spooks you'll come across as you traverse the Sargasso Nebula a slightly strategic lift. Graphically it's a beautiful thing, has top-notch sound design and its combination of coarse British humour and oddball space horror give the whole endeavour a highly original flavour that's well worth checking out, even if the moment-to-moment action doesn't quite match the rest of the package.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Huntdown is a delightfully detailed and expertly crafted throwback to old-school run n' gun arcade shooters. The 16-bit graphical style is immaculately recreated whilst adding lots of modern bells and whistles to proceedings, including a fantastic soundtrack and audio design, optional CRT filter and an arsenal of heavy-duty weapons that chew scenery and enemies to pieces as your bounty hunter makes their way from boss fight to excellent boss fight. The flow of levels may be quite repetitive but the moment-to-moment gameplay, overall sense of fun that comes from the level of carnage you can dish out, surprising amount of hammy spoken dialogue and constant pop-culture references all combine to make this one an easy recommendation, and another excellent addition to the Switch's action catalogue.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Jet Lancer does become slightly repetitive in places, the tight controls, enjoyable action and massive, massive explosions all combine to create a shooter which is well worth a look – especially if you're a fan of this particular genre.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For fans of the original Slayin, a more familiar "Arcade" mode that eschews any kind of narrative is present, and full local co-op in either major mode is a welcome bonus. Overall it's a package we think is well worth the asking price, something that's brilliantly simple in principle, but reveals its intricacies and hidden difficulty as you play through; it wouldn't be entirely out of place in a late eighties arcade.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Games like this can work very well if they’re backed up by visually stunning graphics and clever gameplay, but unfortunately, Spirit of the North has neither.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    SuperMash is a great idea that feels squandered thanks to poor execution. The idea of mashing together different genres is a fun one, but the reality is that the resulting games are only mildly amusing at best, and infuriatingly broken at worst. Procedural generation certainly has its place in the industry, with many games using it to fine effect. Unfortunately, in the case of SuperMash the concept is so inelegantly and heavily implemented, we’d much rather sit down with a deliberately handcrafted game any day of the week.

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