Slant Magazine's Scores

For 650 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 25% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 72% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto V
Lowest review score: 10 Troll and I
Score distribution:
651 game reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At its best, Age of Calamity keeps a weak grip on 30 frames a second, and at its most visually chaotic, the game effectively becomes a slideshow.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game is fairly dedicated to correcting many of the worst creative decisions made across the lifespan of the Assassin’s Creed series.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Pathless ultimately buries anything it might have to say in a stupefying level of cliché, grasping for profundity in the shadow of the things that inspired it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tetris Effect is one of the best VR titles on the market, so without the feature Connected feels, well, disconnected.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Melody of Memory is less than the sum of its parts, a judgment one can fairly cast over the entire Kingdom Hearts franchise.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The game noticeably stumbles as it attempts to more overtly address the darkness beneath its concept.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The game’s aesthetic enhances the horror, with your crew’s flashlights rarely being much of a match for the overwhelming fog and darkness, and the monsters reflecting the full ugliness of witchcraft murder techniques like drowning, burning, and pressing. But the gameplay blunts the effectiveness of that aesthetic, because there’s no real danger to exploring the environments here. There might be the occasional jump scare upon opening a window or door, but nothing’s actively chasing you as it would in something like Resident Evil. It’s the weirdest sort of plot armor to be found in a horror game, in that your characters are completely safe in Little Hope so long as you control them, and at risk only when a cut scene takes over.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Perhaps there’s some other take on Legion that lives up to its potential, if not for salient commentary then for player-authored mayhem as you juggle random variables.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Between Star Wars Squadrons and last year’s Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order, EA has finally understood what kind of ride the Star Wars franchise should be taking us on in video game form.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In theory, its intricacies should be bracing, but in practice the fixation on spacing and formation further slows down the pace.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Spelunky 2 remains staunchly committed to its immaculate core design, demanding that we adapt to its rhythms and its secrets.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Everything truly good in Marvel’s Avengers is compromised by its mercenary feature set.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game’s exuberance helps to smooth over its rough spots, like the awkward parrying mechanics, imprecise hit boxes, and messy camera angles that come as a result of being unable to lock onto enemies. That’s because No Straight Roads stays true, above all, to its themes.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Players would be better off firing up their Hulu apps if they want to get a sense of Samurai Jack’s breadth and wonder.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The decision to segment Windbound into discrete chapters isn’t ruinous on its own; the game only spirals into tedium through the slow drip feed of new areas, items, and enemies on a per-chapter basis.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Even when Fall Guys is working perfectly as intended—no server issues, quick matchmaking, good teammates, balanced levels—its appeal is limited.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is the kind of game you don’t realize you missed until you start playing it, one that doesn’t demand much of the player’s time or commitment or discipline but is just trying to find new ways to amuse you from one stage to another.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    These survival horror sequences are neither scary nor fun, and the most challenging thing about them, beyond their forcing you to try to auto-adjust your aim in order to account for the stuttering lag in the frame rate, is how you have to push past boredom. Consider, then, these sequences not so much a premonition but a warning born of experience: Turn back all who enter here, for there is nothing good awaiting within.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ghost of Tsushima has the look of a thoughtful samurai epic, but the façade flakes under scrutiny, revealing that it serves Western blockbuster tastes and tenets above all. It’s a game that so desperately wants to be 13 Assassins but more times than not ends up looking like The Last Samurai.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Origami King has so much exuberance and confidence in all of its designs that even if you’re not completely sold on the combat—and there are modifiers that allow you to get rescued Toads to help solve it for you—the game will still win over all but the most puzzle-phobic and pun-hating players.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The series mainly distinguishes itself through its bizarre atmosphere, as well as its capacity to surprise by introducing new environments and characters, but remixing familiar templates in a level creator captures little of that same charm.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Irritating though they may be, few of these problems would be insurmountable in the face of an engaging narrative. But like countless other pretty games trading on emotion, Röki drones on about feelings, namely grief—all of it documented in Tove’s illustrated journal, and complete with occasional asides about Dead Mom or Sad Dad. Repressed memories, shadow selves, and mysterious environmental sicknesses rear their tired heads. Beyond the trappings of Scandinavian myth, there’s precious little to set Röki apart in an already overcrowded space.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Metaphorically speaking, the developers at Pugstorm have left more than half the carrot buried in the soil.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The game is primarily a vehicle for Amanita Design’s brand of typically immaculate artistry.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mind Control Delete feels like the brainchild of students who were into debate club as much as programming.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A successful tech demo that allows one to truly feel like Iron Man, the game is also a strong superhero narrative in its own right.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The game displays a thorough, haunted understanding of what cruelty for cruelty’s sake can do to the soul.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most impressive thing about Xenoblade Chronicles is still the strength and specificity of its vision, a dense world transcending any familiar hero’s journey.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game’s writing is so sharply detailed that characters come to be defined by more than just their unique skills and abilities, and you come to know them more as they open up about themselves depending on the mission.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Its occasional pizzazz, including Shoji Meguro’s blissful J-pop soundtrack, is undermined by how hard it often is to actually look at the game.

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