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Mixed or average reviews - based on 11 Critic Reviews What's this?

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5.0

Mixed or average reviews- based on 7 Ratings

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  • Summary: Transference is a psychological thriller and the first game collaboration between SpectreVision and Ubisoft. Bridging the gap between movies and games, we invite you to lose yourself in the destructive tale of a man's obsession as you explore his digitally recreated memories. Experience theTransference is a psychological thriller and the first game collaboration between SpectreVision and Ubisoft. Bridging the gap between movies and games, we invite you to lose yourself in the destructive tale of a man's obsession as you explore his digitally recreated memories. Experience the limits of techno-psychology, and escape a maze-like puzzle concealing a corrupted truth. Get projected into the digital consciousness of troubled case subjects and maybe you will influence their fate. Expand

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Transference Reveal Trailer - E3 2017
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 11
  2. Negative: 1 out of 11
  1. Sep 28, 2018
    82
    Singularly short, but also singularly intense. Narrative of high flights with gameplay at height. It is recommended to play in one sitting.
  2. Oct 4, 2018
    80
    A wonderfully executed, narrative, puzzle thriller that kept me entertained through the entire story.
  3. Sep 17, 2018
    75
    Transference brings us a pure thriller: finding out what has happened to a family, in an alternate version of its psique. To discover the truth we have to solve riddles, listen carefully to the family voices and find out every horrible secret. However, Transference is a game developed to be purely enjoyed in VR. So the experience is not as good as it should have been on Xbox One.
  4. Sep 17, 2018
    70
    Transference is an enjoyable thriller that retains its effectiveness in a non-VR setting. Despite gameplay simplicity and underutilized live-action videos, the strong atmosphere and a few memorable scenes help this sci-fi adventure leave a lasting mark.
  5. Sep 24, 2018
    65
    If you have an extra 25$, you can choose to spend it on a short trip to the world of Transference, though a few exciting and maybe scary moments aside, your trip might not be as good as you have imagined.
  6. Sep 20, 2018
    65
    While Transference offers something unique in how it utilises sound, throwing in the mechanic of switching between alternate realities for puzzle solving, it sadly falls flat in its narrative and doesn't offer much to encourage you to come back and explore.
  7. Jan 22, 2019
    30
    Transference is wasted on Xbox One, since it does not support VR. It is not only unbelievably short, it is lacking in content and substance. It is a perfect example of a one and done kind of game where you never look back after completing it, and then forget all about it. It might get brought up later in life, but even then, memories of playing it will be foggy at best. Half-remembered dreams are more memorable than Transference.

See all 11 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 2
  2. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Sep 24, 2018
    7
    Right from the start the story intrigued me and it kept me interested throughout my time with the game because it was very unique to say theRight from the start the story intrigued me and it kept me interested throughout my time with the game because it was very unique to say the least. The presentation side of the game combines with the story extremely well and both the visuals and sound design enhance certain elements greatly. There isn’t much in terms of gameplay the gameplay that is present is very intricate and it certainly packs a punch.
    Exploration is very enjoyable because there are lots of items you can interact with which in my opinion enhances the story even more. In terms of content the game doesn’t have a huge amount and for the price of the game I must admit that I expected quite a bit more. Unfortunately once you complete the game there isn’t any reason to return back to it so there’s no replaybility present. You can tell that this game was originally designed for VR and whilst I enjoyed it without VR I think it would’ve been better playing it the original way. All in all I’m pretty new to the VR experience that’s sweeping the gaming world but I am in favour of it because without a doubt it does offer you the most immersive experience you can possibly have when it comes to the gaming world. I did however play Transference without VR and even though I think it may be better playing it the original way I still had a very immersive experience without VR. The story is the best thing this game has to offer in my opinion and that’s mainly because it gets its hooks into you immediately and offers you a thrilling and at times scary experience. The presentation side of the game also enhances the immersiveness and whilst it’s not the best looking game in the world the sound design excels in a number of areas. In terms of gameplay the game doesn’t have a huge amount and the content is a little light especially when it comes to the price of the game but Transference still gets a recommendation from me because it gets more things right than it gets wrong and there is a ton of uniqueness present in the game.
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  2. Feb 15, 2020
    6
    The theme of Transference is what initially intrigued me about the game. The idea of being able to upload the human brain into the digitalThe theme of Transference is what initially intrigued me about the game. The idea of being able to upload the human brain into the digital space and create a simulated world based on that brain data is an interesting sci-fi topic and sort of further begets the much larger discussion of merging our minds and bodies with computer data and hardware.

    The game takes place in the simulated mind built by Raymond "Ray" Hughes, a brilliant but "mad scientist" type character. The simulation also leverages perspectives from his wife Katherine, a successful musician and their young son Benjamin. As the player, you explore this simulated world and discover that this once strong and loving family has devolved into an empty husk of it's former existence.

    Raymond becomes utterly obsessed with his work on uploading the human conscious to the digital world and it's created a negative impact on his wife and son. You discover that he's downing cup after cup of coffee to stay alert, as evidence by all of the mugs, disposable coffee cups and coffee stained paper littered through the house and he has also been prescribed sleeping pills to counter this. Katherine feels like a prisoner in her own home, sacrificing her successful music career when she married Raymond and to help provide for their young son. Katherine becomes further separated from her musical passion and falls into depression, to the point of having to be prescribed anti-depressants. Benjamin is stuck trying to connect with his Father, whom Katherine describes as a "closed door" and "a do not disturb sign" as well as his increasingly depressed Mother.

    The core gameplay loop revolves around solving puzzles to "uncorrupt" sections of the simulation in order to progress the story. You'll find light switches scattered around the level which allow you to change the perspective of the level's structure, which are key exploring the game, providing clues and getting some more important backstory to the characters. Katherine's perspective feels a lot like a prison, as shown by the tally marked etched into the wall like a prisoner counting the days they've been locked away for. Benjamin's world feels very empty and lonely, supplemented only by the love for his dog Laika. Raymond's world, unsurprisingly, is about his obsession with his work, as evidenced by the various computers, scientific hardware and research papers littered throughout the family home. The further you progress through the game, the more the state of the family begins to devolve, to the point where Raymond is sporting a nasty cut across his left cheek, indicating some form of abuse; self-inflicted or otherwise and Katherine announcing that she wants to get on a plane with her son and leave Raymond behind.

    The size and scale of the game is not overly large. Aside from an outside shot of the family's apartment building to start the game, the remainder of it takes place entirely inside the family's home, however the game's dark and chilling atmosphere left me feeling perfectly fine with this design decision. The story is incredibly linear and loses a lot of it's intrigue with a second play through. The game has some strong FMV performances that provide character backstory. The game's sound design is fantastic, particularly Benjamin's cries for help, screams of terror and frustration provide some heart-wrenching moments.

    My two biggest gripes with the game are as follows: The game's ending is really abrupt and anti-climatic. There's no real satisfactory conclusion for any of the characters and the ending is just you walking through a white "server room" environment before giving you a rather ambiguous ending cutscene. My second gripe is the runtime relative to it's price point: $34.99 CAD for a game that can be completed in under 1 hour is a borderline con. I got it on sale for $10.49 CAD and while that's marginally better, it's still way overpriced for what the game gives you. I can recommend Transference at a deep discount to provide a short, satisfactory gaming experience.
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