The Indie Game Website's Scores

  • Games
For 168 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 GRIS
Lowest review score: 30 Eternity: The Last Unicorn
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 79 out of 168
  2. Negative: 6 out of 168
171 game reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a cheeky push and pull between stealthily making mischief and honking in someone’s face and waddling away gleefully. It’s safe to say that if you had a chuckle at Untitled Goose Game’s trailers, you’ll have several more enacting all the fowl play yourself.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Sojourn’s stakes aren’t so dire, but it still has something to say if you’re ready to listen. Put on some headphones, turn off your phone, and let The Sojourn wash over you. It’s an experience you won’t soon forget.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, Police Stories is a game I give a hearty recommendation, all the heartier should you have a buddy cop to bring along. It strikes that same high-paced, repetitive problem solving note as Hotline Miami but in it’s own way. It’s more methodical, you have to stay on your toes. That can be stressful, but very rewarding when a level is completed and done smoothly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Accompanying the hideous inventory and tedious combat systems is the unforgiveable control scheme, which can’t be remapped at all. Overall, it feels like each of these are intentional choices to help solidify the ‘90s horror vibe it goes for, but just because something is purposely bad doesn’t actually make it good. Game design has progressed a lot in two decades, and Daymare is at odds with what it wants to achieve.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Sojourn’s stakes aren’t so dire, but it still has something to say if you’re ready to listen. Put on some headphones, turn off your phone, and let The Sojourn wash over you. It’s an experience you won’t soon forget.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Devil’s Hunt is a game with obvious flaws, many of which players might excuse for a chance to tear the head off a hulking demon lord or throw unholy lances through the grotesque, glowing body of an angel. There are many more who will watch the trailer on Steam or YouTube and decide the ‘80s metal album aesthetic and combo-happy combat are worth stomaching a story with an infuriating number of dropped threads and unanswered questions. But none of it is worth a writing team that seems to believe rape can be used and excused on the altar of motivating their male protagonist.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Landing just a handful of months after its E3 reveal, Blair Witch stands proudly as one of my favourite indie surprises of 2019. Its ever-morphing and vastly expansive setting of the Black Hills Forrest always evokes chills and I like how the ‘found footage’ trope that defined the 1999 movie was used here in inventive ways during puzzle sequences. I did, however, find myself getting lost far too frequently and the forced moments of stealth were really a test of my patience during the final elongated chapter. That said, Blair Witch is not one that should be missed horror fans, even for those unfamiliar with the movie or Bloober Team’s previous work.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    So, in the end, it’s easy to say if Blasphemous will appeal. Players who love intentionally difficult games will find a lot of value and horror fans who can muscle through will love the game’s visual and thematic design. Unfortunately, the game takes its masochistic themes of martyrdom too seriously, making the player feel like they’ve stepped into the retro gaming equivalent of a back alley S&M club they mistakenly took for an 80s video arcade.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The absence so carefully crafted by Flight School Studios invites us to fill in the narrative gaps of Creature in the Well and creates a unique relationship with the antagonist. But maybe I’m a fool and can’t read the signs before my eyes. Too ready to trust and believe in the good of all. But that’s the power of mystery.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    A self-titled RPG roguelike, Sin Slayers takes a JRPG battle system and procedurally generated levels, mixes them together with a Darkest Dungeon-esque layer of grime and calls it a day. What results is a game lacking in fun and direction, but definitely full of sins.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hunt: Showdown is a little bit DayZ, a little bit PUBG and a little bit Resident Evil. This initial release is strong, with plenty of room to expand. Eventually, new maps, weapons and enemy types will be needed to maintain interest. Hunt: Showdown may not technically be a battle royale game, but it shares enough of the genre’s DNA that I wouldn’t be surprised to see a battle pass in the near future.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some may argue that Telling Lies is less of a game and more of a form of loosely interactive media. If that’s the case, well, it’s the most engrossing ‘non-game’ game I’ve played in recent memory.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The gameplay is similar to other hidden object games, but the stylized look and groovy vibe give it a definite leg up. You’ll do a lot of tapping on things, object manipulation puzzles, and searching each room for hidden codes, safes and other secret things across a variety of locations and missions. Puzzles range from incredibly obvious to frustratingly obscure, but in general, Agent A is a solid little puzzler.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The problem with AER is length. At maybe a couple of hours or so to beat, with a story that doesn’t feel entirely resolved, I wanted more. The gameplay and world are so enjoyable that AER deserves the epic treatment of a full-on adventure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You start out with a sword, for instance, that allows you to turn into a fairy and briefly fly while the sword remains anchored. Press the button again and the sword zips back to you in a straight line, cutting through whatever is in the way. As Mable beats various bosses, like a giant spider and rock monster, she gets their powers, which all work in a similar way. It’s creative and distinct, and also frequently frustrating as hell.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Having to account for inertia when precariously hanging by one hand, as you swing to reach another wall to quickly grab with the other hand is both frantic and fun. In multiplayer, players must work together to climb on each other and world obstacles. It’s a hilarious oddity likely to get lost in the shuffle, but a party game definitely worth checking out.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rad
    As you progress, you’ll earn new mutations and abilities, some of which are hilariously weird (like suddenly have a spitting cobra head with a really long neck). The downside is the unforgiving permadeath rogue-like nature of the game. Progress can become frustrating when you suddenly die and lose all your mutations and have to start again. If you can take the difficulty, though, there’s a lot of great personality and fun to be had.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Children of Morta doesn’t set the genre ablaze, move it in any new directions or do much to widen its reach, beyond letting more casual players grind their way through impasses. In structure and presentation it’s reminiscent of last year’s Moonlighter, but without the unique shopkeeping mechanic which set that apart. That said, there’s nothing wrong with a well-accomplished genre archetype. Do you enjoy rogue-lites? You’re pretty much guaranteed to like this.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Remnant: From the Ashes is fun, but it doesn’t really do anything new. A lot of what you do feels familiar, like a constant sense of deja vu is following you along. There are some cool ideas here, and the story is entertaining enough, but if it wasn’t for the boss fights, the game would feel flat. Even then, they follow a similar formula each time. Of course, not every game has to reinvent the wheel, but it would have been nice to see Remnant try a bit harder to at least change the rims or something.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While there are niggles to the experience, from relatively frequent frame rate drops at the start of each cycle and the AI occasionally getting confused to the game outright crashing (which is naturally quite frustrating), these issues seem like the aftermath of Early Access. With the game having a decent swell of community support and the developers just as keen to keep improving, Oxygen Not Included appears to be going onwards and upwards – or whatever direction you fancy, really.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, while a few design decisions miss their mark, Exception is a thrilling, breakneck platformer with solid level design that begs to be rerun until you dominate the leaderboards.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rebel Galaxy Outlaw, like the first, is a single-player only affair, which might disappoint some. It shouldn’t, though. There are easily tens of hours worth of adventure in just a single playthrough. With the ability to take different paths, replayability is high. Outlaw improves on an already great game in all the right ways and the result is the best open-space adventure in years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If the game’s adventures were longer and more purposefully designed, they could be far more appealing. As it stands, Dicey Dungeons exists for players interested in its idiosyncrasies and punishing challenges.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Subdivision Infinity DX is single-player only and the levels are mostly bite-sized chunks that can be completed in about 15 minutes or less. So, it’s not likely to be a lasting or epic experience like an open universe starship game might be. Sometimes, you just want to go out into the stars and shoot stuff, though, and Subdivision is an excellent game for doing exactly that.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Age of Wonders: Planetfall gives me almost everything I need from a 4X game and a turn-based strategy game in one neat package. Both sides could (and doubtless will) be expanded upon, but the overall package as it stands is extremely good at what it does. If you wanted more depth to XCOM’s strategic overworld or more involving combat in Civilization VI, this is the game you’re looking for.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite its excellent, beautiful catastrophe of a script, Metal Wolf Chaos XD is a tough sell. Why would players want to spend time on a game with gameplay this dated? The reason is simple: Metal Wolf Chaos XD is a reminder that games can be fun even if they don’t meet wider notions of what makes them ‘good.’ The title is mindless fun, a distraction from the confines of what audiences expect when they play a game.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ultimately, The Church in the Darkness rewards players with a fascinating and original cult setting, but the provided method for navigating and interacting with that setting is entirely uninteresting. For some, it may be worth trudging through an uninviting cult compound to understand their experiences and culture; for me, I wish I’d stayed far away.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The mannequin-like orgies, hefty focus on vaginal doors, and character designs that look like questionable 50 Shades cosplayers, however, can’t cover up the fact that what the game is really about (or should have been) is finding all the intriguingly bizarre dildos spread throughout the game’s wonky world.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The action is absurdly fast, hilariously deadly, and perfect for a quick pick-up-and-play session that will make you nostalgic for the golden age of arcades.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With three color-based weapons, the player must use the right gun for the right situation. Certain gun and enemy combos recharge shields, while others will energize the ship’s special weapon. There are also three somewhat different storylines for the game’s three difficulty levels, which is certainly unique. Either way, for those who love old school-styled destruction with modern tech, Pawarumi is a must-have.

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