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Generally favorable reviews- based on 17 Ratings

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  • Summary: While imprisoned in Balduq, Adol is cursed and becomes a Monstrum. With his newfound powers, he must stop the Grimwald Nox from consuming the city.

    Feared Protectors: Play as any of the six notorious Monstrum, each with their own unique Gifts that grant abilities such as scaling sheer
    While imprisoned in Balduq, Adol is cursed and becomes a Monstrum. With his newfound powers, he must stop the Grimwald Nox from consuming the city.

    Feared Protectors: Play as any of the six notorious Monstrum, each with their own unique Gifts that grant abilities such as scaling sheer walls or detecting hidden objects to protect the city from shadowy creatures.

    The World Within the Walls: Explore the massive city, accept quests to aid the townsfolk, and enter the Grimwald Nox to vanquish the threats to Balduq.

    Strength of the Night: Familiar mechanics such as Flash Dodge and Flash Guard allow you to outmaneuver your foes, while new additions such as Gifts and Boost Mode further augment your ability to fight.

    Story
    "What is real is defined by what is not.Who one is defined by who one isn't."
    To move forward, one must accept these truths.
    "Yes, in this prisonthis cradle
    my dreams and reality became one."

    Renowned adventurer Adol "the Red" Christin and his companion Dogi arrive at Balduq, a city annexed by the Romun Empire, only for Adol to be detained before setting foot inside. While imprisoned, he meets a mysterious woman named Aprilis who turns him into a Monstrum, a being with supernatural Gifts and the power to exorcise monsters. Now, Adol must ally with his fellow Monstrum to fend off the fearsome threats emerging from a shadowy dimension called the Grimwald Nox, as well as unravel the mysteries of the Monstrum curse, and the truth behind the unrest within Balduq.
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Ys IX: Monstrum Nox - Accolades Trailer
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 3
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 3
  3. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. Jul 6, 2021
    95
    Ys IX: Monstrum Nox on PC is easily the definitive way to experience one of Falcom’s most ambitious games and one of the best action RPGs you will play this year.
  2. Jul 6, 2021
    85
    A better version of a great game with lots to do and intrigue abound. Ys IX is another winner for the venerable series and it has a better port than the last go-around launched with.
  3. CD-Action
    Sep 1, 2021
    85
    Due to outdated technology, low budget and a slight old school feel, Ys IX gives the impression that it got stuck in time a couple of years ago. It has a lot going for it though, including an interesting multi-layered story, enjoyable exploration of a pretty large city of Balduq, and fun combat that has you mowing down crowds of enemies in real time. What’s important, despite connections to the previous games of the series, you don’t need to be familiar with them in order to follow and appreciate Monstrum Nox. [09/2021, p.39]
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 4
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 4
  3. Negative: 2 out of 4
  1. Jul 13, 2021
    10
    Excellent port for another great Ys game.

    I had a really good time on my first play-through for Ys IX, it’s a game that takes most of the
    Excellent port for another great Ys game.

    I had a really good time on my first play-through for Ys IX, it’s a game that takes most of the good stuff from Ys VIII, and adds its own spin to things, with new interesting gameplay mechanics.

    Among those, we can now glide around for a limited time, or climb walls by running onto them, and other additions in the form of special powers, called “Gifts”, each one coming from a different Monstrum.

    Being a Falcom game, I expected good character development, and yeah we got it, for sure. All of the characters in the game have really wholesome moments and interactions, and their backstories and things we discover about them are, as usual, quite interesting, especially for the main cast of Monstrums.

    I won’t talk spoilers so if I talk about any of the Monstrums, it’ll be by their Monstrum name, and I have to say I liked all of them, their individual gameplay/combat style and personality traits, but my favorite is, perhaps, the Doll, she had a very curious backstory, but overall all of them are pretty decent.

    Being the Ys game where we can play as the oldest version of Adol Christin yet, I can see how Falcom used this opportunity to pay some good tribute to most of the past adventures our red headed friend has been involved in but, as usual, the references to past events and characters/locations are normally pretty subtle (or let's say...not very "disrupting", because there's a really not subtle at all big reference to the previous games, and it's part of the main plot).
    I’d say 95% of this game, like any other in the series, can be played by anyone new to the series, without major issues. Only those who’ve played all of the previous games, will get that extra reward for understanding all the references, they are there, sure, but nothing a newcomer needs to worry about (just make sure to play the older games, anyway, someday :P).

    It was really fun and interesting to see the quite different ways we got to explore the Balduq Prison, but explaining why would be spoilers territory; I'll just say that part of it felt like playing the very first Ys games, but in a modern setting/game. Closer to the end, It was a predictable "twist" in the story too, but I enjoyed it.

    If you have played Ys VIII: Lacrimosa of Dana, the combat in Ys IX is pretty similar, feels quite smooth and responsive, as usual, especially when playing at high frame-rate.

    I enjoyed the soundtrack in this game, in particular "Dreaming in the Grimwald", felt like straight out of Castlevania, but in Falcom's style, quite awesome track IMO; "Heart Beat Shaker" wasn't bad either; of course "Cloaca Maxima", early on in the game and "Glessing Way!", really...there are many bangers in this game, but some come in late areas of the game, still...amazing music overall.

    As for performance, the game has been running great at maxed settings on my Ryzen 5 3600 and RTX 3060 Ti, 1080p at 1.5x Sampling Rate (resolution scale), it stays above 100 FPS in most indoor areas and above 60 outside in Balduq. At 2.00x Sampling Rate, certain parts in the city can drop the FPS below 60, mostly due to HBAO+, Shadows and stuff like that, but that's a lot of resolution there (4K in my case, since my native resolution is 1080p) and when there's lots of vegetation like that field at the Agricultural district, yeah, that can make the frame-rate dip quite a bit but it's fine at 1.5x scale, which would be around 1620p resolution for me.
    Or you can also drop the PCSS Shadows and their Quality a bit, if you prefer to stay at higher resolution rate. Overall, performance is pretty scalable in this version of the game, as expected from a PC port by PH3, and I do hope Durante and his colleagues do continue to work in all of the Falcom games that will come to the PC in the future, because they have proven once again that they get the job done, with these high quality PC ports we’ve been getting from them.

    We can even play with Mouse and Keyboard without major issues (I did play with M&KB for a while to test it), as all the keys can be remapped, making the experience even more customizable than using a gamepad which, on the other hand, using a controller might be a better choice for many, normally Ys games have always been decent games to play on mouse and keyboard on PC, even the older games in the series.

    All in all, great game, with a very high quality port, I enjoyed the story, the characters, the setting (a big change compared to the Isle of Seiren from Lacrimosa of Dana), the exploration, finding all the chests I could, trying to map all the areas, get to know better the NPCs, etc. You know, typical Falcom games stuff, and I do like all of that, Falcom games are like “good for the soul” for me, they make me happy, I think it’s the way the characters and NPCs are in all these games, it’s a trademark of Nihon Falcom, for sure.
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  2. Dec 1, 2021
    9
    Ys IX: Monstrum Nox is an amazing Ys game and an amazing modern day action JRPG. It is in my opinion the best Ys game that uses the currentYs IX: Monstrum Nox is an amazing Ys game and an amazing modern day action JRPG. It is in my opinion the best Ys game that uses the current party system, beating out even series darling Ys VIII in my books. It packs memorable characters, excellent traversal skills, exciting bosses and outstanding level designs to offer a modern day Ys game that still invokes the maze like, vertical level designs of old. It is a fun game and an excellent pickup in 2021.

    By giving each party member an entire chapter's worth of narrative focus in a very Persona-like manner where each member has a day identity and night identity, Ys IX creates a strong cast of memorable, likeable and well-written characters. These are people who live in the city of Balduq which you now visit, each sharing a lifetime's worth of goals, joys and tragedies that make the city lived in and their own characters fleshed out. The focus on Balduq and its inhabitants gives Ys IX and edge not only against Ys VIII's amazing deuteragonist Dana, but also against heavy hitters of the JRPG genre in general. You end the game not wanting to part with the city simply because of how attached you have become to its citizens, and it's all because of these amazing stories they have to tell. There is even a solid mystery plot that's told out in a well-paced manner, ending in a satisfying high point for the series.

    Meanwhile, each party member grants you amazing and powerful traversal abilities that recontextualize combat, movement and level design. You gain abilities like hookshot, gliding, wallrunning and blending into shadows that allow the level designers the ability to craft intricate three dimensional mazes, forcing you to consider all directions of movement when looking for nooks and crannies of treasures and pathways, while increasing the already frantic pace of combat as you zip and glide around the battlefield rapidly. Boss design also makes a noted improvement over Ys VIII as they incorporate these movement options in, making each boss feel like a puzzle to solve as much as they are a hack and slash affair. I want to take the time here to praise their implementation of the charge attack, something they had been struggling with even in Ys VIII. By attaching a wall-destroying property to it, they gave the charge attack relevance again and made it an interesting gameplay mechanic in ways Seven, Celceta and VIII were unable to.

    Ys IX also has a tower defense mode that people are of two minds about. Personally, I enjoyed how often these mandatory sections were mixed up. New elements were regularly added while the environment was mixed up, and an additional collect-a-thon mode was added which once again encouraged you to use your movement options in a very fun way.

    Ys IX is overall one of my favourite Ys games. Even if you have zero experience with this franchise I can recommend starting here. It is solid enough a game while presenting a plot that is fairly stand alone for newcomers to enjoy (despite all the callbacks to previous games). More importantly it brings meaningful gameplay elements like verticality and unique boss designs back into a series that was stagnating into a rudimentary rock-paper-scissors, parry-centric gameplay loop.
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  3. Sep 29, 2021
    4
    "yawn what a snoozefest"- says a character in game
    Couldnt define this game better, its a departure from the adventure of the other older YS
    "yawn what a snoozefest"- says a character in game
    Couldnt define this game better, its a departure from the adventure of the other older YS games and more of a generic fetch quest "rpg" game with too much useless babbling and doing the same wave defend mission over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over...
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  4. Aug 25, 2021
    0
    This latest installment of Ys manages to lose its identity by removing a huge part of what made its predecessors fun. That is, exploration andThis latest installment of Ys manages to lose its identity by removing a huge part of what made its predecessors fun. That is, exploration and fast paced gameplay.

    The poor originality of the game becomes obvious very quickly while it reuses the same formulaic design for every single chapter of the game where you have to break into jail yet again while having a new character that joins your party. You are never really looking forward the next chapter nor are you ever wondering what is going to happen next making the long dialogue unappealing on its own.

    It doesn't take long to realize you are locked into small zones (Within the same city) that gradually expand as story progresses while you're basically forced to constantly do unrelated boring fetch quests to actually progress with the game.

    What made Ys fun is the fact it didn't drag forever to get into the action, story and exploration. Recent Falcom games seem to suffer from the same modern Legend of Heroes syndrome where instead of the main cast moving towards story progression, the story always magically comes to you as you do unrelated mundane quests. Maybe one day Falcom will learn that the world doesn't revolve entirely around the main protagonist.

    As an Ys fan myself, I can say with certainty that this is the worst title by far. It seems like Falcom lacked budget while porting their graphic engine to Unreal and decided to give us a half-assed game hoping to recoup the money it cost them. I'm very disappointed and I hope Falcom can do better in the future.
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