Confess - Twin Shadow
User Score
8.9

Universal acclaim- based on 48 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 45 out of 48
  2. Negative: 1 out of 48

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  1. Jul 13, 2012
    9
    A very strong, albeit somewhat expected, transition from his earlier release, Forget. Lewis has honed his Duran-Duran-Seagulls-Tears/Fears-Bowie-Lost Boys-esque sound to a high-gloss sheen. Great stuff to put on and slip away into a distant, pastel-hued past; creepingly clever lyrics. In summary, it's the idea of the 80s as you wanted them to be -- funny thing this guy wasn't even oldA very strong, albeit somewhat expected, transition from his earlier release, Forget. Lewis has honed his Duran-Duran-Seagulls-Tears/Fears-Bowie-Lost Boys-esque sound to a high-gloss sheen. Great stuff to put on and slip away into a distant, pastel-hued past; creepingly clever lyrics. In summary, it's the idea of the 80s as you wanted them to be -- funny thing this guy wasn't even old enough to remember. Expand
  2. Aug 2, 2012
    9
    Confess is a lot more likeable than Forget, a lot more pleasant and consistent. It's clearly more commercial too, although that's not properly bad here. A pretty simple record but yet with multiple layres, impeccably crafted synths and some great cryptic lyrics. Definitely on my top3 of 2012.
  3. Aug 19, 2012
    9
    A very linear and logical move, Gerorge Lewis Jr. crafts another pleasantly aching heart-breaker of an album. Confess basically magnifies all of what made Forget such an amazing album. Yearning melodies, dancy synths, and love-scorned lyrics are all executed to perfection and undeniably what makes this such a listenable and rewarding album. With all instruments being played by Lewis, heA very linear and logical move, Gerorge Lewis Jr. crafts another pleasantly aching heart-breaker of an album. Confess basically magnifies all of what made Forget such an amazing album. Yearning melodies, dancy synths, and love-scorned lyrics are all executed to perfection and undeniably what makes this such a listenable and rewarding album. With all instruments being played by Lewis, he scores the perfect soundtrack to all his emotional woes. Forget sounded like the work of someone trying to draw inspiration from memories of childhood and adolescence, hazy recollections from a past the author seemed determined to forget but just couldnt. Confess on the other hand is completely immersed in the present circumstances of its creator, a love starved neo-greaser with a soft side. Confess also benefits from the fact that the production while clearly taking its cues from 80's dance pop still sounds so of-the-moment. One of the years best. Expand
  4. Apr 16, 2013
    9
    Confess is a much more confident, follow up to Forget and this is a definite positive. This new Twin Shadow is a much less likeable character than the one we heard in Forget, but an admirable one. Joyful and nostalgic soundscapes can be found across the board with highlights in Five Seconds, Mirror in the Dark and You Call Me On
Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 32 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 32
  2. Negative: 1 out of 32
  1. Aug 9, 2012
    80
    Most songs manage to name drop Lewis' heart or tears in some way, but despite some melodramatic duds, Confess is still an exciting follow up from an enormous talent.
  2. Aug 3, 2012
    60
    It's difficult to say that there are some great songs on this album, but it's true; unfortunately Lewis fails to take advantage of this fact by lagging behind the innovation and originality of the preceding 80's revivalist movement.
  3. Aug 2, 2012
    40
    Too often, these songs feel as though they're being executed with an arched eyebrow, Lewis Jr. peering knowingly from behind the curtain with a nod and a wink. [Aug 2012, p.110]