• Record Label:
  • Release Date:
I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life Image
Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 31 Critics What's this?

User Score
7.5

Generally favorable reviews- based on 53 Ratings

Your Score
0 out of 10
Rate this:
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 0
  • Summary: The fourth full-length release for Merrill Garbus and Nate Brenner was mixed by Mikaelin "Blue" BlueSpruce.
Buy On
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 26 out of 31
  2. Negative: 0 out of 31
  1. Jan 22, 2018
    88
    The merger of a furrowed-brow intellect and hip-freeing rhythm has been a Tune-Yards constant since Garbus made her 2009 bedroom recording, “Bird-Brains.” I Can Feel you Creep into my Private Life is both more refined and yet more raw.
  2. Jan 5, 2018
    80
    It's as much fun as it needs to be--as it should be. Reflective, restless, fiercely engaged, it feels like it's in constant process of rethinking and remodeling, slicing off bits of musical flesh and slapping them back on elsewhere as it dips and bounces along the street. [Feb 2018, p.94]
  3. Jan 16, 2018
    80
    Despite the seriousness of the lyrics, I can feel you creep into my private life manages to remain an uplifting album, with a collection of intricately-crafted pop songs that tackle a range of important current issues.
  4. Jan 22, 2018
    80
    No easy answers are found, but the new energy here suggests Honesty--the title of a standout techno’n’sax track--has set Tune-Yards free to keep asking.
  5. The Wire
    Feb 23, 2018
    80
    Thanks to Tune-Yards’ trademark genre splicing--demented nursery rhyme chanting, jerky rapping, tortured harmonising and stuttery 808 beats--Private Life shows there’s still space for playfulness amid the polemic. [Mar 218, p.55]
  6. Feb 14, 2018
    70
    Her sound is a junksale of clutter and certified gems. I can feel you… is her most sonically sharp weapon to date, and full of plenty to get excited about if you rifle through it.
  7. Jan 25, 2018
    40
    Only a third of the album works. Obscure, seemingly unfinished, and nattering, this is Tune-Yards’ weakest album to date at a moment when Garbus, distrusting her music’s ability to explain itself, doesn’t need the slings and arrows.

See all 31 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 6
  2. Negative: 0 out of 6
  1. Jan 20, 2018
    9
    Really good album. Probably their best. The beats and vocals are really amazing. The bass is really good and the lyrics are quite satisfying as well.
  2. Mar 8, 2018
    8
    The negative-to-lukewarm reviews from Spin and Pitchfork have nothing to do with the quality of the album, and are simply the work of boredThe negative-to-lukewarm reviews from Spin and Pitchfork have nothing to do with the quality of the album, and are simply the work of bored music critics who are sick of reading good things about Garbus and think it's time she was taken down a peg. I don't like Colonizer, and I suggest she'd do a lot better to simply ignore the "cultural appropriation" nonsense to which she is sometimes subjected than to wring her hands with guilt about it. But by any reasonable musical standard, this is certainly a stronger album than Nikki Nack, and almost as good as Whokill. Expand
  3. Jan 22, 2018
    8
    This is the most approachable Tune Yards album, which is a good thing. Unfortunate that the band is not as relevant anymore because the albumThis is the most approachable Tune Yards album, which is a good thing. Unfortunate that the band is not as relevant anymore because the album might even triumph W H O K I L L. Expand
  4. May 13, 2018
    7
    There is a fine line between ingeniousness and madness, and Tune-Yard's newest release often finds itself jumping from one to the other;There is a fine line between ingeniousness and madness, and Tune-Yard's newest release often finds itself jumping from one to the other; sometimes landing in both simultaneously. Expand
  5. Feb 8, 2018
    6
    I get why Merrill Garbus changed direction on this album. While I loved the afrobeat influences on the project's past two albums, W H O K I LI get why Merrill Garbus changed direction on this album. While I loved the afrobeat influences on the project's past two albums, W H O K I L L and nikki nack, and found some of the criticism to the band of cultural appropriation to be a bit overblown, there were times where she did push it lyrically that felt tone deaf. Although changing the sound from afropop to house and disco, which also originated from marginalized communities but hey at least effort was there. But besides that, I get changing her sound out of respect as well as her growing as a musician. I mean not every band should really repeat what they do on every album. Hell Vampire Weekend ditched their afrobeat sound on Modern Vampires, and that album is amazing! However, I can feel you creep into my private life is not a great change of pace. Particularly because it constantly feels like Garbus is the type of "woke" activist that has a Tumblr account and get constantly ridiculed because of their self-righteous pride is self-aggrandizing rather than for the cause. Now while the social consciousness has always been in the band, a lot of times the navel gaze approach is for the worse as it never really address any issues, such as on Colonizer and Private Life. There are other social themes tackled here, like on Hammer, but for the wokeness of the album will turn off a lot of people. And while that was also an issue for me, it is a very inconsistent album. There are still elements of world music, like on Private Life, which is not as exciting like they were on albums like W H O K I L L and nikki nack, but a lot of the disco and dance elements are often too stiff or a drag, like on Home and Free, or just way too repetitive with weak hooks, like on Colonizer which felt like a rightfully thrown away electroclash tune. There are legit dance jams on here, like ABC 123, the opener Heart Attack, and Hammer, but it's just a drab album all around. Expand
  6. Feb 23, 2018
    5
    If white guilt was an album, this would be it; and that's not necessarily a criticism, but it's certainly at the forefront of the album'sIf white guilt was an album, this would be it; and that's not necessarily a criticism, but it's certainly at the forefront of the album's themes, lyrically. That being said the album seems like it's trying super hard to be 'woke' and I'm not so into that. Musically, the album is really quite repetitive, annoyingly so sometimes, especially on songs like "Honesty", and "Look At Your Hands." I don't particularly enjoy Garbus' voice, so when she's saying the same thing over and over again on a mostly uninteresting dance-pop beat, it just gets old - and that's most of the songs on this album. That being said there are a couple enjoyable and nicely produced songs here, such as "Who Are You." Expand

Related Articles

  1. 2018 Music Preview: 80+ Notable Upcoming Albums

    2018 Music Preview: 80+ Notable Upcoming Albums Image
    Published: January 11, 2018
    Listen to tracks from all of the key albums due out over the next few months, and get details on potential additional major releases for later in 2018.