Loyalty To Loyalty

  • Record Label: Downtown
  • Release Date: Sep 23, 2008
User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 25 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 25
  2. Negative: 2 out of 25

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  1. ChrisH.
    Oct 2, 2008
    2
    I normally don't make hyperbolic statements such as this, but the reviewers above aren't going far enough to warn the listener how egregious this album is and how much distance you should put between yourself and it. Loyalty to Loyalty barely passes as music. It is completely unfocused, amateur, underdone, half-baked schlock! The singing is amelodic and the songwriting is I normally don't make hyperbolic statements such as this, but the reviewers above aren't going far enough to warn the listener how egregious this album is and how much distance you should put between yourself and it. Loyalty to Loyalty barely passes as music. It is completely unfocused, amateur, underdone, half-baked schlock! The singing is amelodic and the songwriting is completely lacking any discernible structure. I honestly cannot believe that this abysmal, shameful, unforgivable, reprehensible pile of sounds was actually recorded, mixed, mastered, and released. In total sincerity: this insulting piece of detritus must be buried under the earth and never be spoken of again if we believe at all in humanity. Absolutely wretched! Expand
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 20 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 20
  2. Negative: 0 out of 20
  1. Almost in defiance of poor sales and cult following, CWK and their charming second album embody everything you hoped music might be.
  2. Cold War Kids attack their songs with unusual intensity, infusing even the most noirish, unsettling songs--fractured narratives about hipster bohemia and suicide--with a feeling of enchantment.
  3. Nathan Willett remains a technically proficient singer, with hints of Jeff Buckley, but much like his band's music, his voice is too drearily clean-cut to deliver a true emotional punch.