Pure

  • Record Label: Spitfire
  • Release Date: Nov 7, 2000
User Score
9.0

Universal acclaim- based on 54 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 50 out of 54
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 54
  3. Negative: 4 out of 54

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  1. GrahamH
    Oct 9, 2004
    1
    Numan goes all Trent Reznor on us, hurrah!!, not. From the moment I picked this CD up and glanced the cover art I thought to myself "this has to be a joke?" Adopting a ridiculous crucifix pose Numan sings about God and Jesus again and again and again. He doesn't believe in God or the Devil but devotes yet another album to both, Exile being the last Biblical bashing, and yet another Numan goes all Trent Reznor on us, hurrah!!, not. From the moment I picked this CD up and glanced the cover art I thought to myself "this has to be a joke?" Adopting a ridiculous crucifix pose Numan sings about God and Jesus again and again and again. He doesn't believe in God or the Devil but devotes yet another album to both, Exile being the last Biblical bashing, and yet another repetitive shoddily produced album. Pure defies belief the D-50 is all over this album as is the Korg M1, with a wall of distorted guitars, ironicaly Numan is regarded as some sort of synth or techno guru I find no evidence of that with Pure. A little known band called Sulphur provide at least some efficient production values even if the material doesn't quite justify having any kind of professional treatment. Rumour has it Numan sent DAT tapes to the band who would then apply their own ideas to which Numan could pick and choose those he preferred. He doesn't like working with other people allegedly, this would explain albums such as Sacrifice and Exile. The albums title track features Numan trying to sing like a genuine rock star, but as soon as the chorus lets rip I found myself cringing with embarrassment. I don't know who suggested to him he could actually sing, and sing with power, whoever it is shame on you!!! Suffice to say none of the other tracks offer anything you haven't heard before. Trent Reznor he aint. Gary Numan rose to fame in 1979, the most unlikely popstar one could imagine, Pure redefines his irrelevance. A laughing stock to many, a clown to most, this album is a poor attempt at reinvention, little wonder then why we don't see Gazza playing big arenas or sell out tours. It's true what they say, anyone can be a popstar or a pilot even. Expand
  2. louiseCat
    Dec 31, 2002
    1
    i hate this cd with all my might and think it should be burned.
Metascore
67

Generally favorable reviews - based on 4 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 4
  2. Negative: 0 out of 4
  1. Pure is Gary Numan's richest, most powerful and most aggressive work in years.
  2. Select
    60
    Numan is now crafting music that sounds identical to his disciples. [Nov 2000, p.118]
  3. One has to give credit to an '80s new wave musician who can adapt and create contemporary-sounding music.... The album can comfortably sit alongside Marilyn Manson and Nine Inch Nails on store shelves. Pure doesn't drive like the industrialized adrenaline rush that is, say, Orgy, but the tracks' lingering and creepy pace leaves behind a different kind of impact -- it's more haunting than relentless