Rad Times Xpress IV - Black Bananas
Rad Times Xpress IV Image
Metascore
70

Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics What's this?

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  • Summary: Jennifer Herrema returns with RTX's Nadav Eisenman, Brian Mckinley, Kurt Midness, and Jaimo Welch under the name Black Bananas.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 18
  2. Negative: 1 out of 18
  1. 88
    Rad Times is a towering paean to a time that never was, when too much was never enough, and a three-minute song could gloriously last forever.
  2. Jan 30, 2012
    80
    Royal Trux's '80s junk aesthetic has since been appropriated by James Ferraro et al, but Herrema does it with a sneer that's hard to resist. [Feb 2012, p.81]
  3. Feb 1, 2012
    80
    Rad Times Xpress IV is an album that you have to listen to for yourself, draw your own conclusions, and make up your own damn mind, if you can or are willing to take the head-long trip that the record ultimately leads you down.
  4. Feb 8, 2012
    70
    Wallop[s] you upside the head with an acid-induced mash-up of rollicking glam, gunky metal and ghetto-fabulous art rock.
  5. Feb 6, 2012
    60
    On the whole, the jams and spaced-out scuzz rock of circa-Sweet Sixteen Royal Trux might most closely represent the vibe of Black Bananas' debut.
  6. Jan 30, 2012
    60
    Black Bananas mostly keep things tight throughout the record. [#39, p.66]
  7. Jan 30, 2012
    30
    In many ways it's a hip joke of an album.

See all 18 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 1
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Apr 26, 2012
    4
    Variety is certainly the key to success, but the "Rad Times Xpress IV" of Black Bananas is simply overdid from the accumulation of all add-onsVariety is certainly the key to success, but the "Rad Times Xpress IV" of Black Bananas is simply overdid from the accumulation of all add-ons in the background that only seem to mess up around the main melody line. This patent admittedly worked on songs such as "TV Trouble" and the irreverent "Do It", but the quality of other composition leaves much to be desired. Collapse