Ravedeath, 1972 - Tim Hecker
User Score
7.8

Generally favorable reviews- based on 26 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 24 out of 26
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 26
  3. Negative: 2 out of 26

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  1. Oct 16, 2013
    10
    I don't think ambient music is typically labelled "destructive" and "forceful," but those adjectives tend to get thrown around a lot when speaking of Ravedeath, 1972-- and Hecker's work in general. That should be a tip-off that this is not music that fits the popular connotation surrounding the word "ambient": it's not music you can really relax to, it doesn't soothe (at least not in a conventional way), and it is in no way "background" music. It is harrowing, emotionally devastating, and excruciatingly gorgeous sound that demands your full attention to be understood. Ranging from crushing tidal waves of noise to delicate minimalist hymns, Hecker's 6th album offers as a broad a spectrum of human emotion as you're ever likely to hear. A classic in left-field music, to be certain. Expand
  2. Sep 28, 2012
    10
    I am a massive fan of Hecker, and the way he can manipulate a church organ into the most beautiful, delicate, eerie, catastrophic, emotional, beautiful & destructive album I have ever listened to is unbelievable. This album's perfection & beauty cannot be put into words; The best album of 2011 in my opinion.
  3. Mar 12, 2012
    9
    Tim Hecker's sixth offering is absolutely captivating. Filled with bleak, melancholic and beautiful soundscapes, and conveying a sense of emotional depth not often reached by ambient musicians. Ravedeath, 1972 is my favourite Tim Hecker album, and the best ambient release of the year.
  4. Oct 13, 2011
    6
    Ravedeath, 1972 is the sixth studio album by Tim Hecker, an electronic musician from Canada. All that you can hear on it is a noise generated by a computer and some piano chords (the LP was recorded at the Free Church in Reykjavík). Nevertheless, Ravedeath stuns with its beauty. Immerse in this body of drone without fear but remember to bring headphones with you: attention is highly required. Oneohtrix Point Never, now itâ Expand
  5. Sep 14, 2011
    10
    Tim Hecker more than delivers, giving the listener a beautiful yet bleak landscape to explore. The album's twists and turns remain exciting after multiple listens and stands as the best album of 2011 for me.
  6. Sep 2, 2011
    0
    Has anyone actually listened to this CD all the way through. It is unbearable and is like James Blake on downers. Seriously, it is pure noise slowed down to a snails pace and all the drugs in the world can't put Humpty Heckler back together again.
  7. Mar 8, 2011
    9
    A startlingly beautiful album, Hecker's 6th studio effort sees his always immense style become even more so. With a sound never anything less than colossal, "Ravedeath, 1972" was recorded in a church in Iceland which is plain to hear; the sound reverberates to the point that at times it feels as if there's a solid wall of sound surging towards you through your headphones. An enormous ambient masterpiece. Collapse
Metascore
86

Universal acclaim - based on 17 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 17 out of 17
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 17
  3. Negative: 0 out of 17
  1. May 18, 2011
    70
    It has many of the same sounds and instruments he relies upon-mauled pianos, organs, and guitars, mostly-but the way they're structured within the songs and as part of the whole are new. The record seems to have no center, no shining single moment, no climax or vortex. Instead it hovers lightly but ominously, like the notes in the songs themselves, hanging in midair without ever dropping to the floor.
  2. Apr 28, 2011
    80
    The album has almost Wagnerian scope and immersive power, and at just over 50 minutes it's well organised as a start-to-finish listen. [Mar 2011, p.50]
  3. Apr 12, 2011
    90
    What resulted is ultimately an album of destructive beauty. Elegance married with sonic destruction!