Rolling Stone's Scores

For 3,975 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road [40th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
3,975 music reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is loud, expansive, unrepentant Metallica.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kaplan and Hubley sing their most confessional, intimate lyrics ever, over whispery guitars, brushed percussion, vibes and organ drones. It's a spell of blissful, psychedelic make-out music... these songs are great - heartfelt, rugged, melodically sumptuous enough to keep unfolding after dozens of spins, full of folk-rock flesh and blood.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you want a vision of the future of hip-hop and techno, get this record.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's one of the best hard-rock CDs you'll hear this year, carrying on the shitkicking tradition of Hank Williams Jr., ZZ Top, Guns n' Roses and Bad Company.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Recalls Janet Jackson at her best.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is a rare, fine thing: the sound of the perfect A&R sales pitch turning into a real band.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Funeral aches with elegiac intensity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the group's fourth proper album, a mightier Mouse refine their weirdness and become a pop band while grasping at dark truths that pop ordinarily denies.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is grandiose music from grandiose men, sweatlessly confident in the execution of their duties.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So much of Tool's third full-length studio album makes so little sense at first. But that is one of Lateralus' most endearing qualities: It rolls out its pleasures and coherence slowly, even stubbornly.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Futureheads reclaim pop punk from the Warped Tour crowd -- and revive it in the process.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The rugged guitar tunes resemble a cow-punk update of the Clash, and Earle's song-to-song perspective shifts dazzle. [2 Sep 2004, p.142]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Neptunes' brilliant, impertinent, full-body funk is, for the most part, what stays with you from Justified; their songs, spacious and shot through with ecstatic aaahs, outshine their neighbors on the album.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Up All Night is a brilliant mod explosion of scruffy pub punk.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an irresistible party: trashy, hedonistic and deeply weird.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eventually every song will kick in from a slightly different angle, including faux folk and cracked ballad.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wainwright's fanciful songs about love and faith place him in the rarefied company of Bjork and Brian Wilson, whose audacious Medulla and SMiLE his album most resembles.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A far more refined and finessed record than its predecessor. [14 Oct 2004, p.96]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Encore isn't as astonishing as The Marshall Mathers LP. Few albums by anyone ever will be. But in the time-honored manner of mature work, it showcases a phenomenally gifted musician and lyricist doing all the things he does best.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He is, simply, better than any other MC in hip-hop except for Jay-Z.... The Marshall Mathers LP is a car-crash record: loud, wild, dangerous, out of control, grotesque, unsettling. It's also impossible to pull your ears away from.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eminem just may have made the best rap-rock album in history
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thunder, Lightning, Strike was hailed as a pop masterpiece when it came out in the U.K. late last year, but clearing all the samples held up its U.S. release until now. Wait no longer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you think you want it, you do. [9 Dec 2004, p.184]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They come on like old-school greasers who've been around long enough to know how to savor a moment.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their riotous manifesto remains the same, but their musical dialect has expanded to include blues, soul and even traces of pristine Led Zeppelin-era metal.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    "Somewhere in a burst of glory/Sound becomes a song/I'm bound to tell a story/That's where I belong," Simon sings on the new album's opening track, and the comfort and command he displays throughout You're the One demonstrate that he's right.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    George throws a bit of himself into most of these tracks, reworking some of the beats and grooves, adding a few instrumental licks, even the odd vocal, but mostly he just programs a dynamic set that proves he's no dance music dilettante.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The slow stuff might be a bit ponderous, but the first six or seven songs manage a rare trick: They're incandescent enough to jump out at you on the radio, yet are steeped in a type of introspective inquiry that was once integral to rock & roll, and has nearly vanished.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Burnside and Co. play with a perfect recklessness, as though no one was listening.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With its preponderance of loping beats and funk-infused grooves, the album does little to update the Stereos' sound, but no matter: The band sounds as vital as ever.