The Fly (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 370 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 II
Lowest review score: 10 Sequel to the Prequel
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 370
370 music reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What’s impressive is that, for all its hymnal melodramatics, Impersonator somehow bypasses insufferability.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As far as second albums go, this is quite brilliant--enough of a departure to render it excitingly fresh, yet still tinged with all the bleeps, pulses and slides that put the magic in Magic Arm the first time of asking.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    These songs are all excellent, and if the album had maintained that level of consistency it might have shaded into genius, but sadly the rest falls short, frequently lapsing into a pleasant but slight flexing of Thundercat’s considerable chops.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although it doesn’t always hit the mark, Swim Deep’s debut proves more than capable of matching to the dizzying highs they write about.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beneath every stoner vocal or woozy guitar line there’s enough melodic nous to ensure Melbourne never wobbles too far into drug casualty territory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Balanced, measured and, when necessary, jump-out-of-the-scented-candle-filled-bath creepy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their debut is yearning blog-pop, which might be a bit ‘2009 called...’ if songs like ‘New House’ weren’t just as sharp as their 80s, sax-ballad ancestors.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The very retro Sleeper is an acoustic affair, characterised by bluesy downers and portentous balladry.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An unholy marriage of the brutal and the brilliant, fuelling suspicion that their best is yet to come.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Whilst Lorde’s world creates its own incredibly distinctive atmosphere, it feels accessible and open to maturing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For now it’s still deliciously entertaining.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When it works, it’s brilliant.... But at times Caramel feels undercooked.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is just the latest in a series of EPs from the Philadelphian, though some may quibble it’s light on original material.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It all feels rather too short, which was surely Mazes’ plan all along: leave ‘em wanting more.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Join The Dots makes good on the band’s promise to deliver a new album every year, though you can’t help but feel certain songs were neglected in favour of more sophisticated production values.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sure, there’s clunky country passages (‘Houston Hades’), brassy crooning (‘J Smoov’) and Cream-y jams (‘Cinnamon and Lesbians’), but Malkmus’ wit remains more than intact in his middle-age.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Total Strife Forever (thanks, Foals) is an ambitious, absorbing debut, and still probably only a glimpse of what East India Youth’s capable of.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Menace Beach may have their sonic ingredients already established, but the result is even better than the sum of their parts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In and of itself, So Long, See You Tomorrow is more or less flawless BBC; their music has always been polite, erudite and winsome, and that beat does not skip here.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    ‘Morning’ is stately in a hopeful sort of way; ‘Heart’ an uptempo standout that hints at the quiet majesty of Nick Drake in his ‘Bryter Layter’ period. Meanwhile the striking ‘Wave’ pits Beck’s vocal against a lush, sad string arrangement by his dad--but there are moments where the introspection slides into an acoustic torpor, too.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A who's who of re-mixers have been cast for the job, and there's value in finding their take on Nick Cave's already unique sound.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Be Strong is funny, innovative, uplifting and, most importantly, always fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Generally Moonfire is an album big on melody, heart and hooks.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Mis-steps like the sticky Santana-worship on 'Hanuman' are far less palatable, but when the combinations match up, it proves exactly how impressive this band have become.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though the grappling guitars of 'Riot In My House' wouldn't seem out of place on an MC5 album, Blues Funeral doesn't always kick out the jams.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A peculiar unwillingness to climax is something that many Shearwater records have suffered with over the years, and Animal Joy is unfortunately no exception.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Its Yeasayer-aping can seem too familiar at times, but on the whole Young Magic's debut is a beguiling brain-burp of a listen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When the wrecking ball stops swinging, however, there are moments of emotional weightiness ('Leader Of The Pack') and glimpses of tenderness ('End Of The Line') that give this LP a more human edge.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Against all odds, 'Some Nights' is a hoot: huge-sounding, packed with tunes and not lacking in humour.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    To say Michael Kiwanuka's debut is not the most modern-sounding album would be an elephant-sized understatement.