The Guardian's Scores

For 4,381 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 A Small Turn Of Human Kindness
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
4381 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The most compelling--and important--avant garde record since "Love's Secret Domain" by Coil.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    I don't expect to hear a better album this year.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An entirely unique return to form.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Majestic while confronting his mortal fears on the gospel-hued Hope There's Someone, childlike and life-affirming on For Today I Am a Boy, he is never less than a class act.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shrapnel-sharp dance music that demands to be heard.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As each song merges into the next, as one style succeeds another, the sensation is that of being in a dream.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The result is a genuinely exceptional and entrancing album, opaque but effective, filled with beautiful, skewed songs, unconventional without ever feeling precious or affected.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It all adds up to a landmark in American music, an instant classic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The prevailing mood is one of euphoria - of clouds parting, sun shining and hearts melting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a rich, deep and strange album that feels like Bowie moving restlessly forward, his eyes fixed ahead: the position in which he’s always made his greatest music.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The songs on m b v, however, are more melodically complex, intriguing and often pleasing than anything he has written before.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This feels like a record that contains a great deal to pore over.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s both appealingly direct yet perfectly thought-through.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of 2015’s most addictive, pulse-racing noisy joys.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Arise may be too long on genre music and short on improv for jazz hardliners, but for many it will be a fascinating perspective on an African Caribbean family lineage shared by McFarlane and her gifted drummer and producer Moses Boyd.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Beyond his trademark agitated yelp and panic-attack rhythms are all manner of surprising and compelling sonic twists.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Realign your expectations, and what gradually emerges is a record of enigmatic beauty, intoxicating depth and intense emotion.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's hilarious, chilling and exhilarating: further evidence of the unique and enviable position Cave finds himself in at 50.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Listening to Choose Your Weapon can hover between delirium and frustration, delight and outright annoyance, often in the very same beat.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are remarkably few longueurs, and plenty of great stuff lurking among the discs of unreleased material.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Iyer is the antithesis of a ­contained and cerebral artist. ­Historicity, for the traditional jazz ­format of an acoustic piano trio, features fewer explicit ­contrasts of tonality and ­extremities of drama than Iyer's more familiar duets with saxist Rudresh Mahanthappa, but it offers a different agenda.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not every effect works (the gloom of I’m a Mother is too airless, the electronic pulse of Longpig too enervating), but on the whole, it’s hypnotic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Martin Jr’s sonic whizzery doesn’t extend to removing the screams from the recording--they continue throughout, a potent reminder of the pandemonium the Beatles generated at their touring peak--but he has brought out both the melody and muscular tautness of the band’s live performance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Seer won't be for everybody, but deserves to win new converts.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may have been exhausting and painful to put down on record, but listening to it is anything but.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Exquisite opener Piel captures the interplay between poise and prostration that has made Catholic ritual such a rich artistic seam, while arch humour is provided by Whip--hyper-real lashing accompanied by the sound of a powering-down robot--and Desafío, which takes disposable Eurotrash pop and makes it worthy of pious contemplation.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a year of impressive solo rap albums, Staples has managed to create one that’s arguably the most idiosyncratic of the lot.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You could say there’s something gimlet-eyed about a woman who realises her relationship is collapsing and automatically thinks: still, great material. But it’s nothing if not honest. And besides, on the evidence of Vulnicura, she has a point.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Franz Ferdinand's album arrives packed not just with fizzing guitars, disco-influenced drums and intriguing shifts in tempo, but also memorable songs, laden with hooklines and startling riffs.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For all the layers of irony on I Love You, Honeybear, the biggest irony of all might be that such an ostensibly knotty and confusing album’s real strength lies in something as prosaic and transparent as its author’s ability to write a beautiful melody.