The Quietus' Scores

  • Music
For 1,104 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Gentlemen At 21 [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Lulu
Score distribution:
1104 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A crescendo of electronic drums and stirring strings draws Distant Satellites to a close, and leaves you with the impression that, while inconsistent and desperately overwrought on occasion, Anathema deserve to be heard out with the private members' club that is prog rock in 2014.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Their arrangements are accomplished, and even the constant falsetto vocals are tempered enough to be pleasant throughout the album, but it's difficult to discern what exactly--if anything--Jungle actually stand for.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's SMD's overstated attempt to take the listener on a journey that is the album's drawback. In the end Whorl feels overlong, and the excitement and variation of the first two thirds of the album eventually dissipates into a somnolent slog.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Gainsborough seems to be testing not only what his crude instrumentation can withstand, but also his listeners. For all the physical exertion though, the album sounds surprisingly sexless and apathetic at times.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Certainly, Pinkshinyultrablast have their sonic template firmly in place but it's difficult to shake the feeling that without a greater focus on melody and sharper songwriting there remains a very real danger of their efforts vanishing into the haze like so many decaying chords fed through a series of delay pedals.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's not really until tremolo laden third track, 'Love High' that the band starts to feel familiar. But once we've gotten into familiar territory, it's clear that what's at fault is not the songs, but the recording and mixing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Hexadic is more compelling as a concept than a piece of music, and few folks are likely to follow Chasny deep into the record's blistering hot core more than a couple times.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Wild Strawberries is an enjoyable record and there are some interesting moments, it's just that the overall sound sort of politely hangs in the background with not much cutting through the haze.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In many ways Sub-Lingual Tablet is, like any Fall album will be, a stranger and superior record than most released in any given year. But by The Fall's own standards, this time that's just not good enough.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Lantern still shows clear signs of the producer attempting to find his feet, if at times faltering.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The one-paced nature of the album ensures that it fails to hold the attention throughout, with the mind frequently dipping in and out of the record, and the suspicion lingers that I Declare Nothing would work better as a pair of EPs and some judicious pruning.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Given the rigid stylistic direction of Meliora overall, Ghost seem to be writing for the expectations of the general metal community with songs like the stock metallic chugging of 'Absolution' and the AC/DC-baiting 'Majesty'. Such safe playing prevents Meliora from being something truly special.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Hype and arrogance created Watch the Throne and stifled the creative revelation it could have been. It would be nice if that could serve as a kind of lesson for the hip hop world, but somehow that seems unlikely.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's something exhausting about this manic exuberance, too. All rush and almost no plateau, it's so fidgety and full of swarming textures that it wears you down.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Feel The Sound, their first album since 2007, boasts the kind of incremental shifts in emphasis that no one but fans will savour.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a timid stand for a band who've made a career out of courageously embracing their fears.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The result is something of a mixed bag: moments of tender and enduring beauty broken up by landfill indie pop with a French accent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Trimming back their signature embellishments leaves an album that strangely is more focused sonically, but somehow aimless in intention.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While World, You Need A Change Of Heart is pleasing in places, solid it certainly ain't.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Continuing Hard Candy's pattern of awful try-hard title and 'show the young uns you've still got it' bangers, it's disappointing in its lack of ambition.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Boys And Girls is a somewhat predictable trawl through the back catalogues of Creedence Clearwater Revival, Stax Records, Janis Joplin and the recorded output of Muscle Shoals Sound Studios amongst others, but with none of the grit, passion or emotion.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's only at this point, ["Incredible Exhausted Bunny Ears"]... that Transistor Rhythm actually feels vital, resulting in in a luscious closing suite to an otherwise arid record.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's clear that this band has focused too much on referencing and too little on songwriting.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the many hugely talented performers involved, Dr Dee is less philosopher's stone, and more curate's egg: a handful of fine songs where Albarn plays to his existing strengths, but mired in a sea of over-reaching folly. And ultimately, both Dee and Albarn deserve better.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    More or less everything here sounds anaemic, lacking in body, squashed, diminutive, like it could be pushed over by a strong breeze--or, worse, drowned out by light conversation on the dancefloor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Three good tracks [songs, "Motion Sickness," "Ends of the Earth," and "Flutes,"] do not an album make - and, unfortunately, this is the sum of the worthwhile moments on In Our Heads. Elsewhere the album is pure drudgery, remarkable only in its dullness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is their pointed after-hours comedown LP, it's not enough of a disclaimer to save what amounts to an occasionally flourishing, but largely frustrating and tedious record.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Though their sound is undoubtedly unique, their music has become formulaic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Guzo is a strange album--it feels like the record label (or management) are calling too many shots, unable to decide whether Yirga should play the Ethio-jazz which we've come accustomed to through the Ethiopiques series, the cool Western jazz of Oscar Peterson and Bill Evans, or a fusion in-between that also includes soul and Caribbean flavours.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Without a single in sight, even by Outkast's loosey-goosey standards, Vicious Lies and Dangerous Rumors feels like three or four different records surgically stitched together illicitly by some cross-eyed back alley quack.