Born On Flag Day

  • Record Label: Partisan
  • Release Date: Jun 23, 2009
User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 10 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 10
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 10
  3. Negative: 0 out of 10

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  1. WardT.
    Jun 26, 2009
    9
    Pitchfork are a bunch of idiots. This is a great, gritty alt-country album, saturated with classic rock influences and touch of '50's rockabilly, simple but full of straight-from-the-heart songs, sung out loud. You cannot love this genre and not love this album. Come on, give it a try. Just because that tool Brian Williams likes them doesn't mean they're not actually Pitchfork are a bunch of idiots. This is a great, gritty alt-country album, saturated with classic rock influences and touch of '50's rockabilly, simple but full of straight-from-the-heart songs, sung out loud. You cannot love this genre and not love this album. Come on, give it a try. Just because that tool Brian Williams likes them doesn't mean they're not actually great! And a bad review from Pitchfork - increasingly meaningless in general - must be taken with a grain of salt here, since the singer has openly called the website a "steaming pile of shit." After this review, it's hard not to see his point. Expand
Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 15 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 15
  2. Negative: 0 out of 15
  1. By sacrificing grit, some of the charm that made the debut a success is lost along the way, but the sleeker production is only a minor setback and some of the songs onboard are Deer Tick's best thus far.
  2. McCauley writes within genre, embraces its trappings, and emerges with completely acceptable results.
  3. Deer Tick's primary shortcoming is that the band evokes authentically gutty music from the past without noticeably inserting much of themselves into the equation, achieving superficial mimesis and comforting recognition while failing to put their own stamp on their creations.