Eyelid Movies - Phantogram
User Score
8.9

Universal acclaim- based on 24 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 24
  2. Negative: 0 out of 24

Review this album

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. Nov 29, 2010
    9
    the critics definitely screwed up with this one as it's easily one of the best albums of the year (as can be noted by the praise of the users). if you love trip hop along the lines of the sneaker pimps this album is a no brainer. i've seen them live three times now and they have managed to top themselves with each show. truly amazing to watch.
  2. Jun 30, 2011
    10
    One of the most underrated/under the radar albums I've ever heard. Every song was well thought out, and contains layers of lush baselines and electro-synth melodies all laced with smooth guitar overtones. Every person that I've introduced this album to loves it. Don't be surprised if Phantogram has a very bright future ahead of them.
  3. Jul 11, 2012
    9
    bloody and brilliant! No couldn't just say that. Sonic music really; electrical madness and such, and Battles and Baths and Fruit Bats and Neon Indian and Cults and completely none of that in all!
Metascore
76

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. Phantogram have put forth a collection of heady and stimulating songs primed for in-the-dark listening.
  2. A refreshing, unusual and diverting first record from two new talents, then, and one to recommend for jaded electro and indie fans who felt the New York scene had gone as far as it could with art-skronk.
  3. From the hip-hop loops and grungy, Dust Brothers-style synths of "Running from the Cops," to the new wave balladry of "All Dried Up," and the trip-hop cool of "You Are the Ocean," these are kinds of left-of-center pop tunes that, in the mid-'90s, could have sneaked their way onto Top 40 and modern-rock playlists (which were basically the same thing back then).