• Record Label: Nonesuch
  • Release Date: Mar 16, 2004
User Score
8.9

Universal acclaim- based on 11 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 11 out of 11
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 11
  3. Negative: 0 out of 11

Review this album

  1. Your Score
    0 out of 10
    Rate this:
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
  1. Submit
  2. Check Spelling
  1. JohnC
    Mar 20, 2004
    10
    Easily Byrne's' most melodious album--including his work with the heads--and the acoustic strings carry on the beauty of Look Into the Eyeball. If the public were conscious of this man's recent music, this would be regarded as one of the greatest albums in recent memory. Buy it.
  2. michaele
    Mar 23, 2004
    9
    these songs never bore, aslways stimulate, a rare mixture of deep thoughts, comedy and elegy
  3. WillTheThrill
    Mar 23, 2004
    10
    David Byrne is the greatest songwriter i will know in my lifetime
  4. GordonR
    May 21, 2004
    9
    Quality and varied songwriting throughout and inspired cover versions too which he carries off superbly. His singing has never been better. The arias even tempted me to buy my first opera cd.
  5. JohnB
    May 21, 2004
    10
    Outstanding. A masterpiece.
  6. AshleyM
    Feb 26, 2005
    9
    David Byrne is in perfect vocal condition on this album. The opener "Glass, Concrete and Stone" is a beautiful track, with strings and percussion that brings to mind an elephant defying the laws of physics and dancing on a metal rooftop in a rainstorm. The opera tracks were a big and welcome surprise.
Metascore
78

Generally favorable reviews - based on 17 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 17
  2. Negative: 0 out of 17
  1. 70
    The instrumental palette is more wide-ranging in a subtler, more subversive manner. [Apr 2004, p.96]
  2. Extends the with-strings concept of last year's Lead Us Not Into Temptation and is equally arresting in its breadth of content and creativity. [Apr 2004, p.107]
  3. 80
    Young pretenders beware: this old dog isn’t so much learning new tricks as inventing them.