• Record Label: Sub Pop
  • Release Date: Oct 20, 2009
Metascore
66

Generally favorable reviews - based on 22 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 22
  2. Negative: 0 out of 22
  1. While memories of the accompanying visuals of the jokes from the series helps, it is by no means strictly necessary to enjoy the humor and musicianship of Freaky.
  2. Even shorn of their comedic context, the best of these tracks still have the power to rupture internal organs at 20 paces.
  3. Another dose of brilliant pop parody from the NZ twosome.
  4. I’m not convinced that the second season, while musically not that adventurous (R&B and hip-hop tracks take up a lot of the disc) doesn’t measure up (and occasionally surpass) the heights of season one and the group’s self-titled debut.
  5. Considering the circumstances, FOTC's second Sub-Pop outing, I Told You I Was Freaky, has some worthwhile moments.
  6. Freaky succeeds not just because it's hysterically funny, but because the songs themselves are authentically good, with hooks and melodies and instrumentation solid enough that you'd go back and listen again even if there were no jokes at all. [Fall 2009, p.58]
  7. The second full-length from the New Zealand duo is pulled almost entirely from the second season of their HBO series, but little is lost in translation. [Nov 2009, p.109]
  8. Individual tracks will wax and wane in popularity, and the genitalia humour of 'Sugar Lumps' et al might attract a wider audience who don’t understand the deadpan atmosphere of the rest of the show, but it’s hard to grow tired of this peculiar couple and their music.
  9. I Told You I Was Freaky is a smart, funny, musically vast album, giving everyone's favorite kiwis a chance to broaden the canvas of their twitchy, awkward, displaced brand of comedy.
  10. The separation anxiety that Freaky induces is its unfortunate undoing, though we can least be glad that someone had the good sense not to include dialogue interludes for context's sake.
  11. It’s antithetical to quibble over issues of originality and cohesion when dealing with song parody, anyway; even when resting on their laurels, the Conchords have a singular ability to pen a damn funny song.
  12. Much like the show’s second season, this second disc fails to build on its predecessor, rehashing the same digs at male bravado, emotional insecurity, and musical eccentricity.

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