• Record Label: Relapse
  • Release Date: Jul 20, 2004
User Score
9.1

Universal acclaim- based on 29 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 28 out of 29
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 29
  3. Negative: 1 out of 29

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  1. vicmarb
    Aug 24, 2005
    10
    this album is too serious, if you like counting crazy time signatures......by all means please
  2. daveg
    Sep 3, 2006
    10
    Different but fun.
  3. Beercan
    Sep 22, 2004
    9
    Intense, technically brilliant, and near-unforgettable, Miss Machine is an essential purchase - though Creed fans and those who don't like to be challenged can stay far away. Rather than try to top their infamous 1999 debut, Calculating Infinity, Dillinger opt instead to streamline and develop their assault, adding industrial elements and some clean singing to flesh things out. These Intense, technically brilliant, and near-unforgettable, Miss Machine is an essential purchase - though Creed fans and those who don't like to be challenged can stay far away. Rather than try to top their infamous 1999 debut, Calculating Infinity, Dillinger opt instead to streamline and develop their assault, adding industrial elements and some clean singing to flesh things out. These changes might turn off some hardline fans, but most will be rightfully spellbound. Bonus: "Phone Home", the best Nine Inch Nails song Trent Reznor never wrote. Expand
  4. LeahL
    Oct 25, 2004
    10
    This CD is nothing short of amazing!! The Dillinger Escape Plan is completely and utterly AMAZING and thats it end of story.
  5. Dweble
    Aug 24, 2004
    10
    I would give this album a 9.5, but There are only whole numbers and I would rather give it a 10 than a 9. I purchased the album with high expectations and was not disappointed at all. The opening song (Panasonic Youth) was amazing, and it never went down from there. When I first heard the few songs with almost possible sing-a-long parts to them, I was alarmed for a moment, but then heard I would give this album a 9.5, but There are only whole numbers and I would rather give it a 10 than a 9. I purchased the album with high expectations and was not disappointed at all. The opening song (Panasonic Youth) was amazing, and it never went down from there. When I first heard the few songs with almost possible sing-a-long parts to them, I was alarmed for a moment, but then heard that everything still worked in that Dillinger-bad-ass way. 'Unretrofied' was something completely new for DEP. I like it though. Even with it's bordering mainstream chorus, the song still possessed that ingredient DEP puts in their work that I can't put my finger on. I'm not sure whether it is the flawless execution of the technicalities, or the brilliant playing of the musicalities, but it impresses me and encourages constant re-listening. I think they picked up a lot from Mike Patton. His presence is definatly felt on 'Setting Fire to Sleeping Giants', among many other tracks. Also, I am glad to see they returned, on several songs, to the calculating infinity sound. Fans of 'Irony Is A Dead Scene' and 'Calculating Infinity' alike will surely love 'Miss Machine.' The jazz/fusion breakdowns are still there, the insane blasts of noise in 15/16 and god knows what other time signatures are there, Patton-influenced omnious vocals are there, Dimitri-style hardcore vocals are there... and there are also new elements. An almost reznor-type approach was used on 'Phone Home.' 'Unretrofied' is unlike anything ever attempted by DEP, and all of it works. Even the over lapped guitar riffs, that don't seem to go together, work. The constant time signature changing isn't awkward at all, and seems like the artists arn't even trying. The ONLY criticism I have of this master piece is the lyrics. 99% of them are great. A very few lines bother me. They just seem to commerical-metal. That is another thing I loved about 'Calculating Infinity' - just the awesome lyrics. I don't know who is doing the song writing, but the consistency with the bad-assness of past works isn't always present. Like I was saying, 99% of the lyrics are great! There is just that 1% that is too angry-kid metal band. When that is attempted, it is almost always cheesy sounding and doesn't impress/appeal to anyone over 15. That is my only beef with 'Miss Machine.' As I said, it is only 2 or 3 lines in the whole album, and that is hardly anything to dock it for. Overall, it is yet another impressive masterpiece from a continually impressive band. Expand
  6. mauro
    Aug 9, 2004
    10
    awesome. best hc/metal/grind cd of the new millenium
Metascore
80

Generally favorable reviews - based on 11 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 11
  2. Negative: 0 out of 11
  1. When a band like the Dillinger Escape Plan is able to duplicate the intensity of the previous album, yet at the same time create music that actually possesses (gasp!) commercial appeal, daring to cause an uproar among dyed-in-the-wool hardcore fans, you know they're on to something memorable.
  2. Giant mutant rats are running about the place with gasmasks and guns. Their eyeballs are electric red, firing lightning bolts of acid, spit and shit and blowing up the place and the furniture.
  3. Rage, speed, and math are still here; but there’s a cinematic scope and a real attention to mood and texture that’s new.