Of The Blue Colour Of The Sky

  • Record Label: Capitol
  • Release Date: Jan 12, 2010
User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 29 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 25 out of 29
  2. Negative: 1 out of 29

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  1. Mar 6, 2012
    9
    Where "Oh No" was a dramatic improvement over their Eponymous first album, it still contained the same pop-flavored playfulness. "Of the Color of the Blue Sky", though, takes a huge composition and genre leap into new frontiers for the band.

    At first glance, this album didn't grab me. But as most "evolutionary" albums go, it takes a few listens to really grasp what the band is attempting.
    Where "Oh No" was a dramatic improvement over their Eponymous first album, it still contained the same pop-flavored playfulness. "Of the Color of the Blue Sky", though, takes a huge composition and genre leap into new frontiers for the band.

    At first glance, this album didn't grab me. But as most "evolutionary" albums go, it takes a few listens to really grasp what the band is attempting. The song that kept be coming back was "This Too Shall Pass", along with (of course) the incredible Rube Goldberg machine video. However, the rest of the album quickly grew on me to the point that I was amazed at the incredible collection of songs.

    Kulash's ever-increasing use of a falsetto is a little distracting at times because, let's face it, he doesn't have the strongest voice. But it does lend character to some of the songs. "Wtf?" certainly benefits from it as it balances out its great, funky deep rhythm, as does "Skyscrapers" and the practical primal scream as the song progresses.

    The elements that are most impressive are the increased sophistication of both lyrics and composition. The band has definitely tried to evolve and grow their sound, which in my opinion is vital for any band to have any staying power. In doing so, they augment their penchant for catchy riffs with some introspective subjects and an increased sonic landscape.

    What would be interesting is to see this band produced by someone that creates a deeper soundscape the way Brian Eno does for Coldplay. Sometimes the flatness and distortion of the production on this album makes it feel more like a demo record than a final product.
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  2. Feb 25, 2013
    10
    Of the blue...out of the blue. Hot and playful. This is an improvement from its previous fun album Oh No. All songs more hip and naughty. Everything is prefect. Simple as it, get the out of your house and buy it!!!
  3. Sep 21, 2012
    10
    Insanely good album, loving it all the way, Ok Go\'s tracks have a habit of being stuck in my head but i'm not complaining!
    Their charming upbeat style and meaningful lyrics cheer me up every time i hear their music!
  4. Jul 14, 2013
    10
    Easily OK Go's best album, with each song having a unique sound that you won't get sick of. I like it more and more every time I listen to it. Bravo, OK Go.
Metascore
67

Generally favorable reviews - based on 22 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 22
  2. Negative: 0 out of 22
  1. Alternative Press
    90
    There are more detours, from austere acoustic avenues to vocodered pop to '80s disco, to fill you with hope for the next decade's offerings. [Feb 2010, p.94]
  2. He's better at riding the power-pop rainbow of ''All Is Not Lost,'' a sing-along for hipsters who remember how to party unironically.
  3. Filter
    78
    It's not oblivious as what Fridmann's achieved with Flaming Lips and MGMT, but OK's new found raunchiness is still dreamy, and Kulash manages genuine soul-boy vocal points through the angular groove of "WTF?" and the sweetly-swaying bump of "White Kniuckles." [Holiday 2009, p.95]