Metascore
84

Universal acclaim - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 21
  2. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. 100
    Beam has given us his second straight masterwork: self-assured, spellbinding, and richly, refreshingly adult. [Apr 2004, p.89]
  2. 90
    Beautifully recorded, this is intimate seduction for voice, elegant finger-picked guitar and not much else. [May 2004, p.93]
  3. Our Endless Numbered Days is very subdued, thoughtful, melodic, and downright beautiful album and the new sound is more of a progression than a sudden shift in values, production or otherwise.
  4. This new album sounds fuller and crisper than Iron and Wine's earlier recordings, but the minimalist artistry hasn't changed.
  5. This may be the kind of album that turns on a new generation of fans to the beauty of folk music, while approaching it from a modern perspective.
  6. Our Endless Numbered Days is cleaner, more diverse, and generally sparser than its predecessor, and, given the apparent limits of Beam's former setup, it's also an astoundingly progressive record: Beam has successfully transgressed his cultural pigeonhole without sacrificing any of his dusty allure.
  7. 84
    With honeyed vocals and the tender touch of acoustic guitar, he is already showing signs of songcraft perfection on his second LP. [#9, p.109]
  8. Has a few more production touches than his past crackling work.
  9. A warm, gently beautiful album that rewards the patient listener.
  10. This time around, Beam is less like some dungaree-wearing, O Brother, Where Art Thou? throwback, and more like the natural - and, frankly, wonderful - successor to the Elliott Smith and Nick Drake school of perfectly beautiful songwriting.
  11. 80
    Beam is a master of circumnavigating cliche. [May 2004, p.106]
  12. Even more delicate and autumnal. [May 2004, p.104]
  13. Beam may continue lacing his ragged acoustic with your heartstrings while quietly whispering about a growing understanding of self, but he isn't sitting beneath a pink moon quite yet. That's surely on its way. [May 2004, p.94]
  14. 80
    Reveals Sam Beam to be a songwriter of exquisite talent and enviable inspiration.
  15. Our Endless Numbered Days won't knock you off your seat with ribald lyrics or rambunctious riffs, but its confident, measured chords and precise tones will hold your attention long after they've grabbed it.
  16. Beam has a lovely lilting voice, a light instrumental touch, and a casual flair for drama. [24 Mar 2004]
  17. Beam's voice is streamlined and a little too perfect for fans of his prior music who felt, with good reason, like Beam was serenading them from their living rooms.
  18. On Our Endless Numbered Days Beam feels some pressure to subtly expand his repertoire, but the swampy blues of tracks like “Teeth In The Grass” and particularly “Free Until They Cut Me Down” interrupt the aforementioned mood like unwelcome hiccups.
  19. Beam seems to have smoothed over some of his rough-hewn ruralist poetics in favor of undeveloped blandishments and sentimental homilies.
  20. 60
    Pay too much attention to these songs, and they dissolve into sweetly harmonized meaninglessness. [Apr 2004, p.130]
  21. Makes John Mayer sound like Slayer. [21 May 2004, p.77]
User Score
9.2

Universal acclaim- based on 39 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 18 out of 19
  2. Negative: 0 out of 19
  1. Mar 25, 2012
    9
    At first, the album feels too slow, way too careless. The songs seem to have the same melody and just copy off one another. However, with further listening, they become some of the most beautiful songs written of the naughties. They make me want to lay out on a summer day and just look up at the sky, my ears hearing each word and instrument with great delight. Full Review »
  2. AndrewP
    May 9, 2007
    10
    Some of the best lyrics ever recorded, and the music complements them so well. Everything about this record is truly astouding.
  3. MihaiV
    Jan 4, 2007
    9
    Nobody makes music like this anymore.