Metascore
88

Universal acclaim - based on 21 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 21
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 21
  3. Negative: 0 out of 21
  1. Anyone who can sit down in such a short period of time and write this many unique songs has to have something abnormally genius working inside.
  2. Banhart is a complete antidote to all the consumer focus groups or hit-writers, too scared to tamper with the formula. He has stumbled upon a personal Eureka that says there're no laws governing what can be written about in song except self-imposed ones and he's taken that to his heart, and in Technicolor.
  3. 90
    It’s as simple as songwriting can get; as striking as songwriting can get.
  4. The combination of timeless songs, superb production and Banhart's often mesmerizing performance make for a very strong album.
  5. Granted, there will be some that cling to the lo-fi eccentricities of that debut, but while Oh Me Oh My... may have won him heaps of critical praise, Rejoicing in the Hands is the album that backs it all up.
  6. The 16 songs that appear on Rejoicing in the Hands, are so striking in their sound and so original, that no producer could've have imagined them. If anything, they affirm Devendra Banhart as one of the most unique musical talents to emerge in quite some time.
  7. Banhart ceaselessly entrances with his brilliant combination of John Fahey-esque pickings, absurd and sometimes profoundly resonating lyrics and the craft to convey both kinds with equal candor.
  8. Mojo
    90
    A nearly flawless set of left-field folk. [Jun 2004, p.106]
  9. The music is just as pure and personal and unintermediated as before, but it sounds better in every conceivable way.
  10. Rejoicing in the Hands is a remarkable album, and Banhart displays a range and gift for melody that belies his twenty-three years.
  11. Rejoicing in the Hands establishes Banhart as a major voice in new folk music. Not only does it improve on the promise of his earlier releases; it effortlessly removes the listener from the context of the recording.
  12. The Wire
    80
    Banhart mixes a relaxed bearing and a tense vocal delivery in a fascinating manner. [#245, p.51]
  13. Q Magazine
    80
    Even more mesmeric and deep into Nick Drake territory: intense and slightly damaged. [Jun 2004, p.94]
  14. A work of art, slightly rough around the edges and a little makeshift, but tremendously beautiful all the same.
  15. Uncut
    80
    Banhart's free-flowing oddness makes most musical eccentrics seem self-conscious and predictable. [Jun 2004, p.90]
  16. If Oh Me Oh My was Devendra’s stunning introduction to the wide musical landscape, then Rejoicing in the Hands further marks his emergence as the most unique and important new voice in the music today.
  17. Banhart's music is utterly unselfconscious and poetic.
  18. Rejoicing in the Hands finds Banhart developing past his early lo-fi recordings in favor of a crisper, more succinct sound that highlights his intricate guitar picking.
  19. Though his second CD has a charming Ambrose Bierce quality to it, a little goes a long way.
  20. 70
    Lost in an eerie, graceful torpor, he opens his mouth and lets words seep out and linger, like so much intoxicating smoke.
  21. It sounds both brand new and old as the hills.
User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 24 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 19 out of 24
  2. Negative: 0 out of 24
  1. Apr 14, 2013
    10
    Not my personal favourite, but definitely Devendra's best so far. Solid, haunting, jolly, illusive (if not trippy) folk in the purest of its form.
  2. Aug 27, 2011
    10
    Can't fault this album, its not everybodys thing, but it wasn't mine till I listened to it again. I think one of the main reasons Devendra isCan't fault this album, its not everybodys thing, but it wasn't mine till I listened to it again. I think one of the main reasons Devendra is so awesome is because he has such an imagination that is reflected in his music and lyrics. I always think a complete album always sounds fresh and this is like diving into newly settled snow every time. Full Review »
  3. KevinK
    Apr 29, 2005
    9
    Combine Antony's (from Antony and the Johsnons) over-the-top vibrato with the subdued spoken-word delivery of Iron & Wine or Sufjan Combine Antony's (from Antony and the Johsnons) over-the-top vibrato with the subdued spoken-word delivery of Iron & Wine or Sufjan Stevens, and you'll get an idea of what Devendra Banhart sounds like. His songs display an irreverent narrative that make each "listen" enjoyable. I recommend this album to any fan of Iron & Wine, The Castanets, or Sufjan Stevens. "Indie-Folk" is back in vogue, and Devendra Banhart is one of the main reasons why. Listen for yourself and see. Full Review »