Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
Buy On
  1. 60
    Buckingham knows his true strengths. Seeds We Sow waves goodbye, just as it began: with quiet meditation.
  2. Sep 6, 2011
    60
    The recording suffers from thin, uneven sound and, on tracks like "Stars Are Crazy," a surfeit of muddling reverb.
  3. Magnet
    Feb 2, 2012
    40
    What's missing ... is a sense of perspective, or humor, or anything to leaven Buckingham's monochromatic intensity. [No. 81, p.54]
User Score
7.2

Generally favorable reviews- based on 6 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 4 out of 6
  2. Negative: 1 out of 6
  1. Feb 15, 2013
    5
    For me, "Seeds We Sow" is a little one-sided. I've never much cared for Buckingham's earnest poppy rock, but I LOVE his edgy, half-madFor me, "Seeds We Sow" is a little one-sided. I've never much cared for Buckingham's earnest poppy rock, but I LOVE his edgy, half-mad experiments. The song "Come" from Fleetwood Mac's "Say You Will," is one of the most thrilling ever recorded, alternating between quiet menace and skinless howling on the edge of the abyss, and "Tusk" is the only vintage FM that I still want to hear. So I keep buying Buckingham's records, in hope of another musical conflagration--just one per album would do it--but I keep being disappointed. "Seeds We Sow" compounds the problem with bad puns ("process of illumination, "one take over the line," e.g.), which, though painful, are still better than the unprocessed cliches that litter many songs. Were you to take a shot of liquor every time Buckingham warbled a prefabricated phrase, you'd be unconscious halfway through the second song. But because I know how original and fearless Buckingham CAN be, I'll keep buying his records--and hoping against hope for less warmth and more scorched earth. Full Review »
  2. Sep 10, 2012
    9
    A quirky album as you would expect from Buckingham, I enjoy this album the most out of his recent solo releases. There is a mixture ofA quirky album as you would expect from Buckingham, I enjoy this album the most out of his recent solo releases. There is a mixture of acoustic fingerpicking wizardry with a healthy dash of electric guitar and studio sheen. The songs are mostly about looking at possibilities in life and relationships, some that were and some that could have been. For a listener approaching mid-life, the album certainly hit on themes that reached me as a person who spends a lot of time thinking about where my life was just 15 years ago and the thousands of what if's that exist. It's impossible to not think of Stevie Nicks when listening to some of his lyrics, and that's probably intentional. It's a theme that will probably run through Buckingham's music as long as he is writing. Any fan of Fleetwood Mac or Buckingham's "small machine" solo work will love this album. If you are more into the mainstream pop culture, there is little in this album to appeal to you. Full Review »