• Record Label: Barsuk
  • Release Date: Oct 9, 2001
User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 35 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 32 out of 35
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 35
  3. Negative: 3 out of 35

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  1. Jul 7, 2013
    10
    "We Have the Facts" is their best work, but this is definitely a close second. It starts out simply, with "Steadier Footing", one of the best opening tracks after "Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space" and "3rd Planet". Moving on to the middle, a lot of the songs sound the same, yet you can still tell them apart. The end gets a little flat, but "Blacking Out the Friction" is"We Have the Facts" is their best work, but this is definitely a close second. It starts out simply, with "Steadier Footing", one of the best opening tracks after "Ladies and Gentlemen We Are Floating in Space" and "3rd Planet". Moving on to the middle, a lot of the songs sound the same, yet you can still tell them apart. The end gets a little flat, but "Blacking Out the Friction" is underrated. "Coney Island" would have made a better closing track than "Debate Exposes Doubt", however. Expand
Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 17 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 17
  2. Negative: 0 out of 17
  1. As intelligent, bittersweet, angular stuff, whether it’s alt.rock, guitar-pop, or even emo is immaterial. Labels be damned - just call it great music.
  2. 80
    Everywhere you turn on Photo Album, [Ben] Gibbard is in transit, singing songs of traveling across America while his bandmates slowly perfect the post-punk melodies that snake their way through these crooked pop songs. It's a great pairing. [#52, p.82]
  3. It's the skillful meshing of Benjamin Gibbard's part-stream-of-consciousness, part-confessional vocals with melancholy piano and achingly melodic guitars that reveal a fleshed-out Cutie are indeed a band of uncommon beauty. [Dec 2001, p.79]