Vespertine Image
Metascore
88

Universal acclaim - based on 28 Critics What's this?

User Score
9.1

Universal acclaim- based on 198 Ratings

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  • Summary: Bjork's follow-up to 1997's 'Homogenic' and last year's soundtrack to Dancer In The Dark is closer in sound and mood to the latter, taking a quieter, more ambient approach. Produced by San Francisco-based electronic artists Matmos, 'Vespertine' utilizes mainly electronic instrumentation,Bjork's follow-up to 1997's 'Homogenic' and last year's soundtrack to Dancer In The Dark is closer in sound and mood to the latter, taking a quieter, more ambient approach. Produced by San Francisco-based electronic artists Matmos, 'Vespertine' utilizes mainly electronic instrumentation, much of which was recorded by Bjork in Iceland. The lead single is "Hidden Place." Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 28
  2. Negative: 0 out of 28
  1. A beautiful, magical, mystical soundtrack; similar to Homogenic, but in a sense, more light-hearted and full of love.
  2. Her best album to date.... Vespertine is an album of small gestures, one almost challenging in its stillness.... The cumulative effect is an album both timeless and of the moment, an avant-garde electronic-pop exploration of classic themes.
  3. In the end, Vespertine commits its magic by daring to go places more obvious and more human than one would have ever expected. [#210, p.52]
  4. Björk's latest is as delightfully eccentric as her choice in outfits, blending scratchy electronic programming with tinkling music boxes and squeezing her formidable voice into ancient-sounding harmonies or futuristic whispers.
  5. The best solo record of her career... Vespertine is the closest any pop-vocal album has come to the luxuriant Zen of the new minimalist techno, even beating Radiohead's nervy Kid A. Where Kid A sounded like a record of risk, the work of a band on unfamiliar ground, Bjork sings here as if she owns and knows every inch of space and shadow in these songs.
  6. 80
    She uses her voice as well as she ever has, giving the moods light and shade. [Sep 2001, p.104]
  7. The entire LP takes on a sort of plodding sameness even as the overall sonics soar.

See all 28 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 66 out of 69
  2. Negative: 0 out of 69
  1. PedroT
    Jan 28, 2006
    10
    AMAZING...this is probably her most beautiful work to date. This is the album that made her a legend.
  2. Charly
    Jul 24, 2002
    10
    Absolutely wonderfull, it's really a masterpiece that everybody that appreciate good music should have. Bjork again shows that she is Absolutely wonderfull, it's really a masterpiece that everybody that appreciate good music should have. Bjork again shows that she is very creative. Expand
  3. Nov 14, 2012
    10
    Vespertine is her best work to date, as being the most carefully prepared in refined in sound matters, also her voice couldn't be better withVespertine is her best work to date, as being the most carefully prepared in refined in sound matters, also her voice couldn't be better with highlights as "Undo" "Hidden Place" "Unison" and "Pagan Poetry". Expand
  4. MikeH
    May 2, 2008
    10
    My personal favorite album of any musician I have ever come across. It can not be beaten (in my opinion) in craft, compositional complexity My personal favorite album of any musician I have ever come across. It can not be beaten (in my opinion) in craft, compositional complexity and perfection, pure hearted, genuine, soulful, painful, euphoric expression, and down right love. This album inspects the inner workings of our bodies, the introspection that comes with being human -- our minds, hearts, and even subtle physiological phenomena in a single micro beat. Everything is included in an infinite, yet minute space, crafted by sound in an arrangement to beat all arrangements. This album feels, breathes, loves, and lives. The closest music comes to mirroring primal human life. Expand
  5. Dec 3, 2013
    10
    This review contains spoilers, click expand to view. Björk's Vespertine transcends this verse of reality as she puts the listener inside a ethereal and calm universe that at the same time has the energy and beauty of a supernova. While the record unravels, we can see a pattern of minimal daily sounds that were boosted to give melodies to each song. This album sounds winter-ish and quite "domestic". It gives a "home" feeling, which I can relate to Björk's homeland, the exquisite and cold Iceland. It talks about the most variate of subjects, from (lots of) sex, family care, snow, winter in general, and even losing keys (B-Side "Domestika"). It all starts with "Hidden Place", a song that talks metaphorically about sex, love, and sort of a shelter. It samples classic music and shows some really out of this world instrumentals, that feature sounds from full choirs to shuffling cards. "Cocoon" is another one that talks about shelter, about home in a sort of way, on the way of finding home in someone else, specifically on the warmth of a kiss between two lovers standing on a melting iceberg. "It's Not Up To You" shows quite the concept of the album: the song is about a day at home, "how to master the perfect day", and how to get whatever the narrator is longing so much for. "Undo" is a jewel. The songwriting and the choir wraps it into a shell of exquisiteness. "Pagan Poetry" is the best song on the album. The crude emotions on Bjork's voice, the lyrics, the strings arrangement, her high notes, everything makes it one-of-a-kind. The song is purely about sex, extremely metaphorical. "Frosti" is a instrumental, but sounds like heaven. The melody could only be made by Bjork's skills. It's a great introduction to one of the gems of the album, "Aurora". The melody and the progressions makes it stand at the top 10 of her best songs ever. It features sounds from ice being smashed. "An Echo, A Stain" is quiet and minimalist, and need to be taken attention for one to like it. "Sun in My Mouth" has lyrics borrowed from E. E. Cummings' poem "I Will Wade Out" and it's one of the highlights from the album. The arrangement and her voice makes it sound somewhat ethereal. It should be longer. "Heirloom" has the whole instrumental sampled from "Crabcraft" by Console, and it talks about how her family takes care of her when she's sick. It has oniric lyrics and envolving melodies. "Harm of Will" has co-writing from the director Harmony Korine, and is another highlight. Divided in several parts, it puts Bjork's voice in evidence and can make one very emotional. "Unison" wraps the record with a 6-minute envolving track that is a favourite amongst several fans. It closes the album with hability only Bjork could pull out. "Generous Palmstroke" is a bonus track that should have been included on the full album. It features only Bjork's voice and a harp played with sheer talent. This album is absolutely amazing. Expand
  6. Oct 6, 2014
    10
    After Homogenic (I don't know why it is not here,it would rock Metacritic), this is absolutely her best album. Brilliant lyrics, uniqueAfter Homogenic (I don't know why it is not here,it would rock Metacritic), this is absolutely her best album. Brilliant lyrics, unique (really, really unique) voice in a perfect harmony with the instrumental and a atmosphere that makes you want to cry but smile at the same time. Björk is God. Expand
  7. ivanl
    Dec 17, 2003
    4
    i love "Post", i just dont get this one

See all 69 User Reviews