Blurt Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 1,303 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Spirit in the Room
Lowest review score: 20 These People
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 7 out of 1303
1303 music reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Melodic, dark and captivating.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    On Wonder/Wander Koone transcends such dippy, blog-generated catch-phrasing, displaying a sense of genuine dominion within the art of experimental laptop pop.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Anthemic stuff abounds here but they really hit a powerful stride in the middle with the fast-paced “Lizard Kids,” the funky bottom of “Lunar Phobia” and the girl-group sweetness of “Wrack Attack.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Men almost casually demonstrate a mastery of song-based rock & roll that usually comes from decades of work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This album is just a few hairs (a couple of tracks and/or segues) short of being a transcendent gem, or masterpiece.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band manages to sound half-inebriated and unbelievably tight at the same time, a loosely strung collaboration that is, nonetheless, completely in sync.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With the ambitious Miracle Temple , Mount Moriah puts its own powerful stamp on a music that's faithkeeping in more than one sense.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s quite a gift to fans, too. Live in Memphis—which has a corresponding DVD available separately--finds Chilton, particularly, in good voice, his obvious playfulness all the more engaging given that he’s performing before a hometown crowd.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s been an odd and unpredictable mix at times, but Mould’s always made a point of indulging his interest with passion and integrity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A vigorous, emphatic outing that offers little let up in terms of its energy and intensity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Much of today’s music draws inspiration from more recent antecedents. Arguably Freedom Jazz Dance: The Bootleg Series, Vol. 5--even as a collection of material originally deemed unsuitable for release--is superior to much of what is new.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of the songs here are better than others (even with more than four decades of hanging out with everyone from Willie Nelson to Keith Richards, there is only so much cred you can breathe into a Paul Anka song), but there is hardly any track here that hasn’t earned the right to stay.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At over an hour, Instrumentals may try the patience of anyone not already acclimated to Pearce’s mood-driven vision. But fans who can’t get enough of his distinctive approach to composition and performance may find this record to be the purest expression of FSAness yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The new album's a stunning return to, and expansion from, seminal Ubu form.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, this is a record full of brilliant Richard Thompson songs given strong readings.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It finds her expanding her palette while resulting in her most diverse offering yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What's been created across this baker's dozen tracks is nothing short of a poignant, powerful referendum on the state of modern England that cements CG's place as one of the finest and most resilient indie acts to emerge from the UK.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Skyline reads as a series of tiny moments--not major life events but instead the beautiful, insignificant ephemera that falls away in the wake of life's progress.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The constant shifts in tone and temperament ultimately affirm Orton's unpredictable instincts, and give Sugaring Season a sweeter appeal.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Mark Kozelek Sings Christmas Carols is a remarkably faithful, utterly transcendent take on what I will humbly submit is the beatific, unadorned side of Christmas music.... This is the holiday release of the year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Marrying Beam’s continued interest in keeping the beat moving with some of the strongest folk/pop melodies he’s yet composed, Ghost on Ghost evolves Iron & Wine music even further into the realm of the mystic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Flumina is an arresting and beautiful work as deep and open as the body of water that graces its cover art.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cut for cut, Big Station is as strong a record as he's ever made.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Carlile has that unique ability to convey sentiments that can be both celebratory and circumspect, and on tracks like “Wherever Is You Heart,” “The Things I Regret” and “Blood Muscle Skin & Bone,” her declarations of devotion are sung with both assertion and affirmation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With twenty tracks and plenty of impromptu circumstance, it may not offer the same potential for pure appreciation that a standard anthology of studio tracks might provide. Nevertheless, there’s an adventurous spirit contained herein, and The Chills show they’re adept at heating things up as necessary.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's obvious at the outset they create a mighty bold impression all their own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Who is the Sender? is a beautiful piece of work from a veteran talent that world has finally woken up to experience.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like his debut, 2012’s Clear Heart Full Eyes, Finn’s solo records tend to be a little darker and more-sparse than Hold Steady albums.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The band draws from the members’ mutual admiration and concerted input, but while it’s an admirable first attempt, it never quite gels into anything of enduring interest.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Untethered Moon may lack the shiny object-appeal of the band’s debut, or the epic brilliance of their major label debut, Perfect From Now On. But it showcases Martsch’s strengths and suggests an artist who, despite his qualms about universes micro and macro, has reached a comforting détente with who he is.