Fact Magazine (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 448 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Seer
Lowest review score: 10 >Album Title Goes Here<
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 448
448 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plenty of new producers are doing interesting things on the outer fringes of the style--Filter Dread is probably Runge’s closest contemporary--but nobody sounds quite like this.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The sounds that Dall brings to bear here are often gorgeous, a sun-dappled, analogue-soft electronica of rippling synths and glinting percussion that recalls--and sometimes strongly--the atmospheric IDM of the mid-90s.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s fair to say that Modern Worship is the fullest yet realisation of its creator’s distinctive vision, and it’s a rewarding album--but not quite a stunning one.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Order Of Noise [is] a meaty, satisfying listen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Production-wise, the album sounds as if it could have easily slipped from any number of top tier rap labels, yet with Gates at the helm, the journey is deeper, darker and far more invigorating than anything from the last couple of years with a Rozay, Em or Hov co-sign.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Galaxy Garden is ambitious, which is to be lauded, and Cutler also has a reassuringly realistic outlook when saying that he is still "chipping away at a big idea".
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, dependable lounge ambience this ain’t; as the album progresses, any sense of cohesion or purpose is quickly lost to the sheer density and variety of ideas.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even given the sheer wealth of variety and detail Fhloston Paradigm crams in, it’s never lofty or inaccessible; instead, it both upholds an electronic music convention even as it carves its own singular niche.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By the end, you only want more: you find yourself wishing that Neneh Cherry and The Thing would just go ahead and cover every song in the world in this inimitable manner.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hesitation Marks follows the musical lineage that began with The Fragile, but it surpasses recent NIN albums thanks to a deeply personal thematic core and a willingness to push the songwriting into territory that is often dancier and poppier than listeners have come to expect from the band.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mantasy is a noticeably self-contained work: it unfolds gradually and deliberately, full of wholly beguiling details.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's stacks to enjoy, but, for the most part, Release bares its bones and hides its heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There is some meat here, but it’s difficult to suck it off the bone. Perhaps in his efforts to prevent his music being “reified,” Warwick has fallen short of saying anything much at all.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The journey bounds from emotional high to low and back again: ecstasy and agony can both cause tearful eyes and heart palpitations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Will Happiness Find Me? is a fitful, thought-provoking listen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Legacy’s most obviously rewarding moments, then, are when Space pushes this alien thrill to its limit.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Total Loss is a largely dud-free album.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fernow takes a more sprawling, less finely textured approach, so that Through the Window strikes a fine balance between morbid gloom and its faintly cheesy reference points.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Say Yes To Love feels like a purging, 20-odd minutes of urgent expulsion that leaves you feeling exhausted, elated and renewed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By and large, though, Moiré counters spontaneity with poise.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is not just exciting for its sound, but for what it promises too.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is not the moment where he will become a superstar, but it’s a promising beginning to what should be a very long career.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    La Roux’s march may has slowed to a stroll, but she proves here that she can captivate at any pace.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No Love Web Deep is another scintillating missive from one America's most conceptually rich hip-hop acts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The final outcome is a trebly plastic-fantastic quality, rendering Shrines closer in tone and texture to coke-rap than ethereal indie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Block Brochure is a daunting proposition and quite simply a difficult amount of music to process. This is unfortunate, though, given the sheer number and variety of gems strewn throughout.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unfidelity stands out as a keeper.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In running time and number of songs, (III) may be their shortest album, but it's also their most cohesive personal statement yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By blending the conceptual drive of Post-Foetus and the organic songwriting of Baths, Wiesenfeld has delivered on the promise of Cerulean and found his place among contemporaneous pop experimenters like Grimes and Autre Ne Veut.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unselfconscious and joyfully untrammelled, most importantly Never is charmingly weird--that quality so coveted by indie chancers everywhere.