Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,329 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Black Parade
Lowest review score: 25 The Endless River
Score distribution:
1,329 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Though long and featuring a bounty of ideas, The Electric Lady is surprisingly slight.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Lips' catalog is exhaustingly long, but Arabia Mountain is a fine reassertion that its talents extend far beyond running from venue security.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    She's clearly capable of belting a worthy song out of the park, but once again she's hampered by bloop singles and the infrequent double.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In his determination to establish his own lane, though, James has let his once-strong songwriting sag.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a set of songs, though, Divine Fits' debut feels pretty process-oriented, more workbook than showpiece.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The King Is Dead clings so closely to formula that it doesn't sound like homage or even truth; it sounds like the studious but unconvincing work of an extremely gifted mimic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If the style is intact, though, the songs here seem a bit lackluster; only the relatively jangly "Harmony Around My Table" and the Velvet Underground-ish "Peanuts" (think of O'Hara in Moe Tucker's role) really stand out from the tasteful mid-tempo blur.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    1989 is a deeply catchy, sleekly-produced pop record with the slightly juiceless quality of an authorized biography, a would-be tell-all bleached of the detailed insight she’s trained us to expect from her.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There are exceptions, but most of "Talkie Walkie" is static and not fleshed out, like a perfectly produced series of unfinished demos.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The album's polished, middle-of-the-road approach isn't exactly for everyone, but its agreeable heart doesn't hit any sour notes, either.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's no denying that, three albums in, the winning novelty of Art Brut's tightly defined project is beginning to wear off.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Acoustic guitars replace glistening synths, bittersweet steel guitars slide in to provide the patina of rural rootsiness, yet Richie still never really steps away from the polished sheen that characterized his musical heyday.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Suck It and See (English slang for "give it a try"), slows the pace but ultimately feels even more detached.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As impressively specific as those sonic ideas are, though, Deschanel's songwriting here is less distinctive than it was on "Volume One." Too many of the tracks bleed together in a well-appointed mush of major-minor melodies and hand-me-down lyrics about the inevitability of heartbreak.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Wack Album feels awfully short on fresh ideas.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Where Does This Door Go feels like a once-promising OK Cupid date that's gone off the rails.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The sounds are largely tepid arrangements that fail to generate much excitement.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Freeway's penchant for ham-handed hooks and emotionally flat attempts at introspection ('I Cry') and romance ('Take It to the Top') reveal, over the course of these 14 songs, an ultimate two-dimensionality.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It seldom gathers enough momentum, and doesn't feel the least bit cohesive.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The cussing, the horror, the anger, the disappointment, the alienation, the frustration, while real and scary and sad, gets tiresome. That's a lot of Tyler, and so much ego-maniacal nihilism, while fascinating and at times revolutionary, wears thin very quickly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In his quest to impress, Big Boi short-changes the street-level swagger that always kept his partner Andre 3000 here on Earth.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Yet for all the sleek settings and the vocal firepower Ledisi deploys, Turn Me Loose doesn't really present an artistic persona any more memorable than the earnest traditionalist from "Lost & Found."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    "Idlewild" leaves the ears longing for something. Coherence, basically. There's no sustaining mood, no clear message, only Benjamin and Patton's efforts to outdo whatever they came up with last.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Roots have always been more about the music than the lyrics, but "Tipping Point" excels at neither. [11 Jul 2004]
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    More often than not, though, Nas offers windy whines instead of innovative ideas.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The singer has no trouble making herself at home in these cuts, but the flimsy material can't quite conceal her hit-hungry desperation. Braxton fares better in the album's slower, more sensual songs.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If Gaga had only spent as much time on pushing musical boundaries as she has social ones, Born This Way would have been a lot more successful.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Between this and the first "Alone" installment, there's enough gristle for the third-best Weezer album as yet unmade. Cuomo's Patron problems are beatable--it's the "Pork & Beans" that's really derailed him lately.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Home may be where the heart is, but Bentley was a lot more compelling when he was poking around up on the ridge.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Hombre Lobo is much more effective when Everett keeps things one-dimensional, as in 'Tremendous Dynamite,' a deliciously fuzzy blues-punk rave-up in which he describes being "on the prowl for a restless night," and 'Beginner's Luck,' a jubilant ode to the boundlessness of new love.