New Musical Express (NME)'s Scores

  • Music
For 3,900 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 These Were The Earlies
Lowest review score: 0 Streets Of Gold
Score distribution:
3,900 music reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    X
    They've just made the best rock album since Andrew WK's 'I Get Wet'.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For what it is, for what it does, for what it represents and for exposing the idiocy of people who only care about 'what it earns us', then, a truly, TRULY great pop record.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This music is the electronic, Warp-inspired answer to Brian Wilson's 'Smile.' [31 Jul 2004, p.41]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Simply put, Strokes have every quality rock'n'roll requires from its finest exponents and Is This It is where they come together.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Even if you've been fortunate enough to live with these tracks over the last year or so, they still sound more vital, more likely to make you form your own band than anything else out there.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Ten years after their last masterpiece, The Flaming Lips have finally produced another one.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Let England Shake is an album that only the Polly Harvey of today could have written.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By assembling a cast of their favourite musicians and delving into their adolescent memories, Daft Punk have created something as emotionally honest as any singer-songwriter confessional--and a lot more fun to dance to.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    AM
    Arctic Monkeys’ fifth record is absolutely and unarguably the most incredible album of their career. It might also be the greatest record of the last decade.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Remedy' is probably as good a dance album as anyone from these Isles has produced this decade.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Burke delivers as pure and proper a record as you'll hear all year. If you've ever laughed or cried, you need to hear this.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is its author Kieran Hebden's best work to date and confirms the prolific young soundmeister as a major talent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite all this seemingly new wave-laden, impeccably cool, retrograde influence, 'Make Up The Break Down' is indisputably now.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Uniformly excellent.... Few, if any, British bands are making music quite like this right now.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's thrillingly obvious that Junior Boys have made one of the year's best albums. [31 Jul 2004, p.41]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A record of glorious parts that are just too weighty, too emotionally complex and rich to hang together well as a whole.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Muse have widened the goalposts and re-established what rock is allowed to stand for. Next to ‘Absolution’, even something as majestic as ‘Elephant’ sounds so painfully small.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Soul music full of remarkable sonic ideas.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The eloquence, barbarism, tenderness and sweat-drenched vitality of 'Elephant' make it the most fully-realised White Stripes album yet.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their world - sexual, drug-filled, and occasionally paranoid - has become progressively darker, and as such we find them nothing less than guardians of the rock flame.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Imagine 'Lost Souls' injected with Prozac and a huge dose of weird guitar noises that give you goosebumps from head to toe. That's 'The Last Broadcast'. It's one of those rare albums that makes sense first thing in the morning but you can still yell along to when your head's exploding.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Adams of ‘Love Is Hell’ has gone out to make an album that actually is classic rock ‘n’ roll rather than one that can simply impersonate it, and sound convincing. [Review applicable to both Part 1 and Part 2]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Adams of ‘Love Is Hell’ has gone out to make an album that actually is classic rock ‘n’ roll rather than one that can simply impersonate it, and sound convincing. [Review applicable to both Part 1 and Part 2]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    All told, it's incredible this is a debut album. Accomplished, yet subtle, it works perfectly as a whole in a way all the production skills in the world couldn't replicate.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The nerve of it all is breathtaking. Turbo-beats poke up a gospel-jazz revivalist meeting, a mariachi band wanders into the hazy disco sashay of 'Broken Dreams', a Gary Numan sample gets bludgeoned to credibility in the Van Helden-esque pogo of 'Where's Your Head At?'.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By any criteria an astonishing work.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Here's music for the twilight hours - feverish, contemplative, nostalgic. It resonates with the force of a thousand passionate post-club conversations in darkened, smoke-filled rooms, of intense, doomed liaisons, of youthful arrogance undercut by fear and failure.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    '10,000Hz Legend' is nothing like 'Moon Safari', then again it doesn't really bear a resemblance to much. Instead, it's a glowing, highly ambitious, quasi-concept album that sees Air spiralling off on a wildly idiosyncratic and brilliantly insane tangent all of their own.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Filled with both a clarity of instrumentation and thought, this is an album of undeniably mature work. And one which knows how to effect a large emotional impact without unsightly flexing of the muscles.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A seething, furious album; a declamatory statement against cynicism and passivity and the simple injustices of everyday life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their most focused, energetic pop record since 'Radiator'.... Certainly, 'Phantom Power' shows up Radiohead's timid adventures, while giving The Coral something to aim for too.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Take Them On, On Your Own' is a masterpiece. You should get hold of it as soon as possible.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Let It Come Down' is another towering achievement - both musically and emotionally.... This is music as it's meant to be: raw, colossal and awe-inspiring. No wonder everything else just pales in comparison.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    PJ Harvey's best album since 1991's 'Dry', a return to the feral intensity of that remarkable debut.... The clarity of the electric guitars played by Harvey, Rob Ellis and Mick Harvey is enough to make you fall in love with elemental rock all over again.... You could quibble Harvey has absolved her responsibilities by making an album earthed in the New York sound of 20 or 30 years ago. But when rock is so invigorating, so joyous about love, sex and living, all arguments are null and void.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Low have always sought to make music that can both swell the heart like a gospel tune and capture the amplified absence of a funeral parlour. It's difficult to imagine a more perfect expression of their vision than this.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So contagious is their enthusiasm, you could start thinking that black-clad nihilism has kept music to itself for way too long.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's every ounce of Idlewild's potential fulfilled at once.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's an album of outstanding natural beauty, an organic, wholesome work.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Seems that after all the pale imitators, Radiohead finally have a competitor worthy of healthy comparison.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Since I Left You' is proof that while being a vinyl junkie might not make you a teen idol, crafting a joyous, kaleidoscopic masterpiece of sun-kissed disco-pop definitely will.... Cool? Sure, whatever. Brilliant? Undoubtedly.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A record that anyone who’s ever demanded anything interesting from rock music should hear.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Complete and utter filth from start to finish, and that's as high a compliment as we can bestow on an album.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They’re a shaggy-haired, surf’s up pop band and painfully vulnerable all at the same time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A joyous, celestial celebration of sound.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    ‘Room On Fire’ is a refining and tinkering with The Strokes sound, a carefully calibrated attempt not to fuck up too early in the face of untold temptations. The results are still sleek, sexy and thrilling, with a tantalising promise of even better to come.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The funniest, most refreshing British debut in years.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What 'Drukqs' never is, of course, is boring. It's also beautifully paced. No track sounds like the one before, even though Aphex rarely strays far from the musical palate that's served him so well in the past.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's easily the electronic album of the year, but for all that, it doesn't break particularly new ground. The point more is that what ground is broken is done so with exquisite artistry.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An understated classic: a triumph of delicacy over decibels. [19 Jun 2004, p.56]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The angriest, least compromised, most utterly justified pop record in years ?
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is murderously good stuff. [25 Sep 2004, p.64]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Album of the year? It's definitely a contender. [7 Aug 2004, p.49]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lyrically it's astonishing. [28 Aug 2004, p.55]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What you have here is the most agonisingly voyeuristic listening experience in rock, ever. It's also some of the most exhilarating and brilliant rock'n'roll of the past 20 years. [7 Aug 2004, p.46]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Yoshimi...' sets yet another benchmark.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Daft Punk have pulled off a brilliant wheeze by re-inventing the mid-'80s as the coolest pop era ever. And not even the officially approved retro-kitsch cool of Madonna's lukewarm excursions into post-Daft terrain but all the bubble-permed, sports-jacket-and-jeans excesses they can muster.... Mostly, though, 'Discovery' is simply fantastic pop...
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The true masters have finally awakened from their slumber.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A clearly adult, unfashionably sensitive document, all grace and understatement, experimental through what it leaves out, and the effects it plants in the background.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the most assured debut albums of the last five years.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For those of us who still believe in music's power to redeem, 'Funeral' feels like detox, the most cathartic album of the year. [5 Mar 2005, p.49]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A real-life pop record. Well, not pop in the Girls Aloud sense of the word obviously, more in the drop-dead, fuzz-box brilliant 'Here Comes Your Man' sense. [10 Jul 2004, p.48]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bono's genius is that his inner monologue is so huge and heroic that it matches the scale of the music. And, even more so than on 'All That You Can't Leave Behind,' the music is enormous. [13 Nov 2004, p.55]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'A Grand Don't Come For Free' is proof that 'Original Pirate Material' wasn't a happy fluke.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'The Contino Sessions' can mean whatever you want it to. All we know is that it feels amazing. Warhol also said that everyone would be famous for 15 minutes. Death In Vegas' glory starts now.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While this is clearly not the record Smith intended to make, it's still an immensely gripping and cohesive piece of work. [23 Oct 2004, p.47]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the most exciting hip-hop releases not only of this year, but in recent memory. [27 Nov 2004, p.61]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The ultimate rare treasure. [24 Sep 2005, p.47]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Showcas[es] Rufus as one of, if not the best songwriters of his generation. [19 Mar 2005, p.59]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It marks the dawning of an era of British music that isn’t just for the casual petrol shop consumer, but stuff so important that you can give yourself to it completely. This is the album that’s going kick open the door for all the great British bands that’ll sweep through in their wake.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A miniature classic. [14 Aug 2004, p.49]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    ATDI's latest album has its amps cranked to the hilt from start to finish. Far from being another in a long line of sanitised American punk rock albums, 'Relationship Of Command' sounds REAL.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By celebrating what it is to be a freak in 2004 they've made a debut that's unique yet uniting, deep yet designed for the dance-floor.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Smile' stands up with any of the great music of the 20th century. [25 Sep 2004, p.63]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gruelling assault course of lyrical genius that pours itself into the 18 tracks on this album-
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a third album that avoids all the pitfalls of third albums: introspective without being self-pitying, expansive in scope without being pompous, exploring new directions without disappearing up its own arse.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Go! Team's eclectic soundclash makes us feel deliriously dizzy. [11 Sep 2004, p.53]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is one thing to make a clever record, it is quite another to make a clever record that could pass for a pop album, and which oozes humanity while simultaneously delivering a perfect snapshot of modern British life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Let's Get Ready', Mystikal's fourth LP and his first Billboard chart-topper, is one wholesale fighting muthaf**ker, a full theatre of opportunities to offer the world outside. Women? Mystikal will take you down for one. Or, preferably, two. Reputation? Come see about him. Neighbourhood? You don't wanna go there... Mystikal is the fightingest bastard and his grin's never wider than when he's putting the hurt on.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The objective was to make a fucking brilliant album where the mood is king, the delivery is queen and studied modern coolness is a jester that's one misplaced quip away from being the lion's breakfast. And, of course, they've succeeded.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A painfully honest, emotionally draining album. [22 Jan 2005, p.49]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A set of immense maturity that never rubs your nose in its thematic complexity, compositional innovation and thunderous thump-beats. [29 Jan 2005, p.58]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where 'The Remote Part' was their 'Green'-esque lunge into the spotlight, 'Warnings/Promises' is their full-blwon 'Out Of Time' spectacular. But with less twangle, more teeth. [5 Mar 2005, p.50]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Silent Alarm' is no 'Franz Ferdinand'. In fact, listen to it with the words 'popular' and 'arty' in mind and its spirit is closer to the Manic Street Preachers' 'The Holy Bible'. [5 Feb 2005, p.49]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An astonishing debut of cosmic country noir. [28 Aug 2004, p.57]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is an album that leaves you in absolutely no doubt that, at the very least, Pascal Arbez-Nicolas is the best thing to come out of France since Daft Punk. [30 Apr 2005, p.63]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    X&Y
    Confident, bold, ambitious, bunged with singles and impossible to contain, ‘X&Y’ doesn’t reinvent the wheel but it does reinforce Coldplay as the band of their time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is big, epic, widescreen music, albeit wonderfully understated. [5 Mar 2005, p.51]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lyrically lucid and sonically exciting. [11 Jun 2005, p.67]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Capture/Release' is fresh, unique, original even; its oh-so-contemporary reference points are revisited with such punk-rock vivacity and hell-for-charity-shop-leather vigour that they might be the first band you’d actually believe when they roll out the old "no, honestly, we were doing this long before we’d even heard of Bloc Party".
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A masterpiece.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An album which radically extends the Franz musical palette.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Z
    By balancing progression with consolidation, technology with tradition, MMJ have created a work of stunningly expansive ambition. [15 Oct 2005, p.36]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Slightly less lo-fi than previous efforts--although as it blends together Slayer, Japanese noisecore and warp-speed prog intricacy, sound recording fidelity is a relative concept. [5 Nov 2005, p.45]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Believe the hype, this is even better than 'Ray Of Light.' [12 Nov 2005, p.45]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A disorientatingly great mess of free-jazz, space-rock and voodoo swamp music. [10 Dec 2005, p.37]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A monster of a record. [4 Mar 2006, p.31]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    [Has] the unmistakable feel of an instant classic. [28 Jan 2006, p.34]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The wonder of 'Stars...' is how magnificently alive all this suburban angst sounds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There's no possible way of having this much fun without getting the chorus of Handel's 'Messiah' drunk on peach schnapps. [4 Feb 2006, p.29]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Thank you very much, Mr Rubin--The Man In Black is still with us. [1 Jul 2006, p.36]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Muse have made a ridiculous, overblown, ambitious and utterly brilliant album, with more thrills than their previous three put together.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Odd, addictive, unsettling and beautiful. [8 Jul 2006, p.41]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There's going to be a hearty scrap between this lot, Muse and the Monkeys when album of the year time comes round.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is one to file alongside 'American Idiot', 'Doolittle' and 'Nevermind' on your greatest US rock albums shelf.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Put simply, this is fantasy pop, performed to perfection.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even the most hardcore disciple is likely to get something they might have missed before. [21 Oct 2006, p.35]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their best yet.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A record with the bleak-yet-redemptive spirit of REM's 'Automatic For The People' and the musical magnificence of a 'Deserter's Songs'. But also a record that - as much as 'London Calling' or 'What's Going On' - holds a deep, dark, truthful Black Mirror up to our turbulent times.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Myths Of The Near Future' is charged with the same spirit which fuelled legendary rave pranksters The KLF's period of pop subversion.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By turns brooding and effervescent, but always outrageous fun, 'Writer's Block' is a compact minor classic.
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The most doubter-defying second album since 'Modern Life Is Rubbish'.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Icky Thump' is brilliant, there's no way around that.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Let's Stay Friends arrives as a startling cannon-shot message of brain-thawing intent.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sonically, it was staggering.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is an album of genuine depth, one expressing the nervous conservative shockwaves which charge through party kids once they start to come down.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Seldom Seen Kid is a stunning record, a career-best from a band whose consistency has seldom been matched by any British indie band this decade.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    That it’s Portishead’s best album yet is little short of miraculous.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Stay Positive not only confirms The Hold Steady’s status as one of the best rock’n’roll bands in the world, but establishes them as one of its most important too.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So believe it: this is the real thing, no-one’s crying wolf, not even Alan McGee.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a sleeping giant of a dancefloor creeper that will be everyone’s favourite new electro album in approximately six months’ time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cooked up in a session originally meant to spawn a batch of B-sides, We Are Beautiful, We Are Doomed instead debuts 10 songs that outstrip LC!’s debut album at every turn.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There’s still a lot to love about B&S, but there was something magical, otherworldly even, about them during this period that this compilation captures perfectly.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Much like the title of his debut, Indiana’s curious ringmaster Stith is a contradiction in terms. Don’t be put off--he’s a contradiction worth losing yourself to.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Swoon is a bit of a dying whale of a record. In a good way; vast, dark, a little mysterious, sad, dignified and palpably in pain.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    My Maudlin Career is the kind of record that exists to reward those both mad, and sad, in love.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Time will tell how Primary Colours stands up to the likes of "Loveless" or "Psychocandy," but right now, this feels like the British art-rock album we’ve all been waiting for.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The spontaneous sounding arrangements--topped by Watson's uniquely mercurial voice--are at turns ornate, grand and subtle, but never less than totally bewitching.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Overall, you get the kind of lush musings that’ll soundtrack all the pivotal moments of your wayward summer romance. Blissful.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Taking Mangum’s recorded-on-cardboard lo-fi folk epics as their ground zero, TRAA turn in the best alt.debut of the year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Remarkably, with this astounding debut, an unassuming 21-year-old from SW2 has revitalised a forgotten form to make one of the finest forward-thinking British pop albums of recent memory.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Wild Beasts have undergone a sea change, and this beautiful album is a treasure that deserves plundering.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They have done a hell of a lot of growing up. An immense album.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Recovering emos Brand New have taken doing things their own way to the point of invisibility, but their journey into the widescreen ether continues with yet another breathtakingly accomplished record.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Girls are genuine drop-outs, bona-fide freaks who’ve made a record far removed from the predictable cycles of the music industry. Now that’s a real story.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Origin: Orphan is the sound of The Hidden Cameras finally proving they can make records as wham-bam powerful as their performances, with deliciously sumptuous results.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Complex and artful, there’s no need to understand fugues and canons to appreciate this--its utter perfection and joy is self-evident.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Stripped of all the sonic flotsam that usually surrounds them, Animal Collective come into their own--if you can ignore the chatter to listen with innocent ears, they surpass ‘good’ and remain bewildering.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They’ve made an absolutely magical record--the jagged edges of their past have been smoothed by the sea, making Teen Dream a soft shore gem in the crown of the great chronicles of youth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's genuinely surprising, beautifully wrought and announces TNP as one of the most powerful artistic forces in Britain today.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What it does do, however, is remind us that he is a copper-bottomed genius.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An album with a distinct dual personality, Marina’s dazzling ‘The Family Jewels’ pitches the confident, MTV Awards-headlining superstar of our dreams against a more self-deprecating girl-next-door Marina who’s dead set on Supertramping and vamping her way out of her fug.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    When your nightbus home is beset by phantasmagorical drunkards with beady, threatening eyes, when your ears are bashed by mendacious line managers and eyes beset by the violence of news/advert/news, then this incredible album is your passport to a better place.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every tangled note of Option Paralysis drips with honesty and endeavour, and it shines like a beacon of integrity in a world that's been focus-grouped into the dirt.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    on their third album, the combination of Canadian indie (Broken Social Scene), psychedelic ’60s rock (Love), cosmic ’70s pop (ELO) and shoegaze (Ride) is nothing short of beautiful.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The ore of modern Pitchfork rock is here, laid out in all its flawed-diamond beauty. For a canon so flagrant in its faults, Quarantine is all-but faultless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For all his fragility, Avi is as good a songwriter as anyone who's ever traded under Sub Pop's logo. And that's quite a claim.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A stunning LP that, in a just world, would do for Roky what the "American Recordings" series did for Johnny Cash.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Antique keyboards pulse, fretless basses thrum and a variety of voices echo in and out, underlying the trippy feel and making this pretty much the most scintillating and daring record of the year so far.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This album is an onslaught of brutal drumming and bowel-loosening riffs, occasionally leavened by surprisingly delicate vocal interplay.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Suburbs isn't anything as simple as back to basics--they're a much more accomplished, musically interesting band now.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Each track on their fourth boasting a captivating blend of experimentalism and depth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is an album to fall in love to, to break up to, to drown sorrows to, or to bounce around to. One-hit wonders? Well, the wonders part is right.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Swans' bleakness is beset with great beauty, black wings to another world.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    King Night is sick. Not just in the sense that it's outstandingly good but in the fact that it seems extremely unwell.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Glasser's glowing debut offers more melodic and emotional consummation than almost any of her peers can muster, poised in a genuinely transcendent golden balance between the stern, the spacious and the gaudily sparkling. A very precious Ring indeed.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Warpaint's is a different darkness, not delighting in splendour or show, but in deftly exploring a bleak internal, romantically bereft landscape.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whenever Mr Rager sets off on his next adventure we're ready, musical machetes in hand, to follow him into the undergrowth…
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's the best thing he's done since his game-changing debut, and heartening evidence to suggest the self-professed Louis Vuitton don is in a good place right now.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Assembled by the album's main beat-peddling prodigy, Lex Luger, they showcase a masterclass in reductionism; juggernauts of hulking, bruising, brick-to-skull intensity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Kiss Each Other Clean is a surprising and majestic triumph.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It'd be hard not to draw parallels between Calvi and [...] PJ Harvey. Yet while both women ooze an elemental kind of passion, Calvi is unashamedly slicker, especially when compared to Harvey's earlier, grungier work.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It traverses a spacious, synth-dusted soundworld many future-dreampop miles from their girl-group and grit beginnings; the ambition will be a sonic shock to those who wanted the band to stay the 'working-class heroes' they wryly joke about being. It shouldn't, really.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Everything about this album boils down to escape.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Smother is deeply sad and lonely, but still a barbed invitation to intimacy; like Coleridge's albatross, an extraordinarily elegant, stunning, (near)-perfect portrait of how terribly bad decisions can turn out.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In an age where even Britpop corpse-botherers Brother trumpet their desire to collaborate with Odd Future, the Monkeys have made a record heavily indebted to late-'80s indie and a small group of white, male '70s singer-songwriters: Lou Reed, David Bowie, and Leonard Cohen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Pummelling electro punk at it's finest.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Virtuosity and accessibility have never been easy bedfellows, but Strange Mercy is one of those rare albums that makes you think and makes you fall in love.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is that rarest of things, a record so particular to Björk's own artistry that no-one could ever hope to replicate it.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is beautifully structured, leading from spare and shimmery beginnings into harder, weirder and more varied territories, all those snippets and elements and personalities crafted into a shifting, subtle whole that quietly captures your attention from start to end.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tribes have roared back fiercer than ever.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This isn't just her finest album, but one of early 2012's best.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Within all the emotional turmoil, there's a lot for the listener to love.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A reverence-inspiring return.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is miles better than 'Innerspeaker', and quite possibly the best album released so far this year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A+E
    A+E is Coxon's most thrilling and noisy album since 2000's The Golden D.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's like the best bits of every extreme metal subgenre: a deathly crossover of sludgy, blackened thrash that will put hairs on your chest.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It still defiantly goes against the grain, but also explodes with immediate, attention-grabbing riffs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The lyrics, meanwhile, continue to move FOTL up two or three rungs of excellence.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    DIIV need you, and you sure as hell need DIIV.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Shrines is a euphoric treat in its own right, made all the more thrilling by its heady potential.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The TNGHT EP packs five explosive instrumental hip-hop tracks, every one dripping with each producer's trademark sonic flourishes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As it turns out, Love This Giant is completely out of kilter with what's contemporary, and off-the-hook brilliant to boot.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ultimately, this album is the sound of the future.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It has the reckless spirit of a record that hasn't been over-analysed, but with an intense flurry of ideas from someone in the absolute prime of their creativity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album's more subdued moments--like the disarmingly sweet navel-gaze of 'Simple As This', or the folksy arm-around-the-shoulder reassurance of 'Note To Self'--are its most remarkable ones, where Bugg's voice, usually accompanied by little more than an acoustic guitar, takes on a preternatural wisdom.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Being doomed seldom sounded so beautiful.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    [A] brilliant album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Light Up Gold is one of the best debut albums you'll hear all year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The emotive finesse of ‘Cherry Blossoms’ might further the calls for a shoulder to blub on, but chugging full-band showstopper ‘Ramona’ shows Yellen’s songwriting to be as rich as his voice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Holy Fire brings new words to mind. Sharp. Emotive. Massive.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Exhilarating and violent.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A masterpiece that merges the experimentation and freedom of their side projects with Cave’s most tender songcraft.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s wrought with haunting, high-stakes emotions, but the strength of Scott’s voice means it never feels melodramatic or plainly vulnerable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Child Of Lov may have started off as a shadowy enigma, but now is when Cole Williams lays his cards on the table. Turns out he was hiding a royal flush.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Once I Was An Eagle sets a high bar.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Josh Homme and his all-star pals prove the virtue of taking your sweet time on a record that’s as self-assured as it is damn sexy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As Britain suffers from youth unemployment and economic crisis, our greatest currency is the chime of a golden tune. Peace have delivered 10 of them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a tightrope across a canyon down which many a pie-eyed baggy daredevil has fallen. Jagwar Ma make it look effortless.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gratuitous filth, basically. It’s funny, but also a pity, because Yeezus is so tight, so bold, that with a few tweaks Kanye could’ve made his rock for the ages. As it is, he’ll have to settle for one of the best records of the year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the reasons Major Arcana works so well is because it’s addictive and fun, which could explain how these characters got into such a mess in the first place.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is wild music, a celestial cabaret that absorbs and unsettles.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a more honest, human, realistic--and totally wonderful--guide to life.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lee’s lyrics are sometimes sentimental to the point of potentially seeming trite, but they’re logical for a situation where love and pain have become so overwhelming that simple statements seem the most trustworthy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Burial’s success has brought with it imitators, but with this EP he’s outwitted them all by introducing a gloriously widened palate to his music that is both instantly familiar and shockingly unlikely.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a deeply personal record, unequivocally sensual.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Burn is her first album recorded with a full band, though the resultant fuzzily glam swagger doesn’t forsake her wise style, instead coming off like Bill Callahan covering T Rex.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The result is an LP that feels more in sync with contemporary music than ever before. There are notes here of Oneohtrix Point Never, Clams Casino, and Tim Hecker. Crucially, though, Present Tense roams a landscape which couldn’t have been charted by anyone else.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like Justin Vernon before him, with Lost In The Dream Adam Granduciel seems to be heading for things far bigger than anyone could ever have expected. This is one War On Drugs that might just succeed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mac knows better than to let his bellyaching get in the way of everyone else's good time--instead, he’s simply dialled down the quirk and written his best record yet.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is cold-blooded revenge pop that strikes like a shard of shattered plate to the heart.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s an insane and challenging, ambitious and exceptional work of art.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Just as Moz's stance as a one-man outsider army and ringleader of the tormentors is restated, so is his standing as the godfather of indie disaffection and despair.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In spite of all the terror and uncertainty, it's the warmth that lingers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The doomed relationship cycle in eternal motion or the sound of a heart that won’t stay mended, Honeyblood is visceral pop music giving its prettiest snarl.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's clever, brave and seamless enough to become a classic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They have returned hungry and wired to shake us out of our digital comas.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    His outfit have returned with an album that skirts close to perfection in its 35 minutes of glorious madness and transcendent, George Harrison-like guitar solos.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s heavenly, in its own troubled way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This Is My Hand should see her join him, her other collaborators and St Vincent in the US experimental pop pantheon.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Syro is amazing: bug-eyed, banging rave that sounds quintessentially Aphex while not quite sounding like anything he’s done before.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Our Love, then, is the moment it all came together for Caribou.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rips is a reminder of rock’s glorious communal potential.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cranking the urgency and confrontation of last year's self-titled debut to neck-breaking intensity, RTJ2 is an urgent, paranoid album for a violent, panicked time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Complex, original and even sincere, it’s a brilliant new departure.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Hum is all feel, no bullshit, and it truly gets under your skin.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A diverse but wholly coherent set of songs, this spaced-out odyssey is well worth the trip.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They’re too wilfully mad to emulate Tame Impala’s success, but if you’re after a freaking out, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard’s outrageous noise deserves attention.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The good--no, the astonishing--news is that this constantly engrossing record repays a decade and a half's faith and patience. D'Angelo has scuttled down the digital chimney with an early Christmas gift with long-lasting rewards: not just one of the best records of 2014, but one that will stay with you throughout next year, too.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s heavy, assured and profound--a terrific record alone, but also one that sits in the Sleater-Kinney catalogue naturally, like they’ve never been away.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Written around the time Tillman got hitched to this girlfriend, it's a hugely ambitious, caustically funny album about the redemptive possibilities of love, and being heartily sick of your own bullshit.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Closer ‘Sea Of Trees’ is as impressive, its restrained riff suddenly smothered by an almighty dirge. It’s a fitting climax to a record that unsettles from start to finish.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of Sufjan’s most fat-free and consistently stunning records, but also his darkest.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Great Pretenders is an emotional, emboldened triumph.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This isn’t so much a progression as a rebirth.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s lyrically dark and has the musical aggression to back it up.