New Musical Express (NME)'s Scores

  • Music
For 4,351 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not
Lowest review score: 0 Maroon
Score distribution:
4351 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Accelerate is by some considerable distance REM’s best and most cohesive album since Berry left, and crucially echoes a time when they made their best music, if not necessarily their biggest-selling.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For the most part, though, After The Disco unfolds at a fertile equidistance from each man’s comfort zone (inasmuch as a polymath like Burton can be said to have one) and the results are a marked improvement.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s no better soundtrack to getting by and falling in love as the world wobbles unsteadily about us.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Vaccines' debut does a wonderful thing--it reminds you that guitar music still works.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nine Types...will make those who over-contextualise TVOTR finally quit their chin-stroking and live a little.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His third album in as many years shows he’s on a streak that’s both prolific and high quality.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A bit of a winner. [17 Sep 2005, p.58]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lynne’s melodic sparkle, as ever, acts as ELO’s warp drive. He expertly gives tired old genres shots of refreshing stardust.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their truck-stop talk of tumours, drunk moms and Isaiah 11:6 focus the album on Deep South degradation, but the lush Lemonheads-pop of ‘Drive’, the stoned drive-in glam of ‘That Man’ and the girl-band psych-blues of ‘Baby Mae’ lend this record the tint of a narcotic and poetic take on Fleetwood Mac’s ‘Tusk’ with Jack White on fuzz and Phil Spector on shotgun.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    TV On The Radio have returned from an uncertain period sounding remarkably fresh.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re chasing the initial buzz, Little Fictions is quite a hit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With not a single duffer over another eight tracks, it looks like our eventual Best Of Body Talk compilation might just be the album of the year.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Marcus Lambkin seems to have a thing for awful names and even worse puns. Luckily for us, as Shit Robot, his ability to craft sublime slices of electro house and muscular techno pop trumps everything else about him.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether listening to them or foolhardily attempting to describe them, there’s little about Marijuana Deathsquads that’s easy, but that doesn’t make their third LP any less rewarding.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Angry blues stomps such as ‘Early In The Morning’ are the aural equivalent of Wild Turkey for breakfast, while ‘Out At Sea’ combines the grit and growl of the Bastards’ beginnings with a layering of sounds that’s wider, more expansive and ultimately more interesting.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her second, now with indie Bella Union, is a precious mix of childlike insouciance and adolescent anxiety.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A volatile brew of uneasy drama and emotion from a band that, on this showing, should always record live.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her music is smart, rich and thoughtful enough to pull it off.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Smart; savvy; insanely resilient: 'Waterloo To Anywhere' is just the ticket.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all its musical philandering, unbridled excess and shrouds of irony, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a record with more musical depth and warmth all year than this one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Talkie Walkie’ deserves to do as well as ‘Moon Safari’. There’s no question that it’s a better record, a different record, written by a pair of supremely talented and greatly improved musicians enjoying total mastery of their studio and sound, who aren’t afraid to take risks for fear of offending their audience.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite being a good 30 years out of time, it's absolutely brilliant.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Johns’ 10-track debut solo album is a placid but gutsy amble that pitches him as Bill Callahan dealing with a lazy hangover the morning after a pub crawl with Guy Garvey.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shoegazing in origin, barn-storming in conclusion. [24 Jun 2006, p.43]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the whole, Red Hot + Fela works both as an introduction to Afrobeat, and as a reworking of the genre, making it a fitting tribute not just to Fela’s music but also his indomitable spirit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Less interesting songs like ‘In My Feelings’ and ‘Hold Me By The Heart’ should probably have been chopped, but they don’t prevent her from making a great first impression.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sexy, fierce and occasionally very, very silly, this is an album made to be played on jukeboxes in backwater biker bars the world over, loudly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If these pals enjoy bugging out to clusters of dizzying breakbeats and/or swooning, sad house chords, so much the better.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It couples a moody sort of glamour with a concrete feeling of loneliness, and it makes for some of the most affecting comedown folk you’re likely to hear all year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Largely flirting with conformity from a distance, Gore really comes into its own in the latter half, when Deftones open the silo doors on their buried missiles of epic melody.