No Ripcord's Scores

  • Music
For 1,714 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Halcyon Digest
Lowest review score: 0 All Things Bright and Beautiful
Score distribution:
1,714 music reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    One's enjoyment of Dream Get Together will depend greatly upon their appreciation for good jam sessions. Jam sessions are fine after all, but it's hard not to be a little disappointed in Citay after hearing the disparity between what they are capable of and what they want to be.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    However many crystalline moments of beauty their records contain (and of course there are some to be found here), for me there remains a cloying sense of the overtly melodramatic, of uninventive repetition that it is hard to ignore.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    My high expectations for Boca Negra, misguided as they were, have been consoled, if not met, by the realization that if any act can legitimize avant-jazz beyond its narrow niche (never mind my aforementioned doubts), Chicago Underground Duo have the verve and creativity to enable it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Where ["The Bliss"] bubbled and spat like hot fat, its meticulous construction overflowing with polyrhythms, Black Noise seems disjointed and overlong even though it runs for roughly the same duration.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is such a charming little band, such a charming little album that one wants to like it more than it deserves.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Broken Bells is clearly a mood record, but even with so many textures, resources and talent, it all hits one stilted note. Either this is an indicator of where the temporarily Shin-less Mercer is headed or its little more than a curious footnote on his and Burton's careers.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This isn't a bad album, and these quotes are by no means deal breakers, but it is a little telling that an album about “feeling lost” suffers from a distinct lack of focus or specific vision.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s their most consistent outing since their debut, but it’s never much better than average. BRMC is a decent rock band, and if all we expect from them is fuzzed out garage jams they don’t disappoint.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    They show the beginnings of great ideas in almost every song, and a few get the full treatment and stay great all the way through. The good songs are very enjoyable, the rest of the album is, unfortunately, pretty forgettable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ultimately, like many live albums before them and certainly after them, it's just okay. It succeeds in capturing a performance that is an apt representation of the band and is largely an aural pleasure, yet you never really shake the fruitless nature of the album.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    And Then We Saw Land isn’t a bad album, it just doesn‘t grab you.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Where Volume One was strongest was simply the quality of the songs (try getting Why Do You Let Me Stay Here? out of your head in a hurry), yet there’s something sadly lacking about Volume Two, and what previously sounded like finely-crafted homage is now often more like impotent pastiche.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As a longtime fan of Usher, this album has great moments and also lagging tunes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Enter Wu-Massacre a fun, but mostly forgettable affair that comes from three of the clan’s most prominent members; (Ghostface, Raekwon, Method Man) and for the most part ends up being little more than good-natured fan service.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Abyss isn't a failure--their audacity to upend themselves, contriving each and every step of the way with an expansive sound that masks away the more attention-grabbing arrangements is worthy. Props to them for sounding like everyone else and no one else at the same time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A four-year wait is inexcusable, especially when more than half of the album exudes familiarity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In lengthening the song lengths and trimming the tracklist, No Mas jettisons the spontaneous, off-the-cuff energy that made their debut so incredibly fun.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Infinite Arms isn’t nearly as charming nor nearly as emotive as the band’s other work. It’s an image of a band that’s exhausted their aesthetics to a point of sterility, and it’s going to take a lot of soul-searching and reinvention to figure out where to go next.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Five Ghosts chooses to communicate in a simpler, terser manner, which counteracts their evident vigor to test out miscellaneous musical approaches. By switching their objective, Stars' fifth effort has become their true reversal of fortune.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    You could call it inconsistency, but you can tell they never signed up for the mission of steering the chasm of modern rock music. Instead, they're four guys doing what they want, culling their influences and breathing life into whatever construct emerges. But regardless of where it falls on the spectrum, it's always fun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Magic Kids do pull off a winner with Summer, a sultry delight of abounding strings and tropical strums that, sadly, sounds out of place with the obvious eye winks scattered throughout. Memphis may borrow from such an imaginative time period, but their explorative range remains very limited.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's great when artists learn to produce work that has more than one dimension to it. Robyn's has two. I'd just like to see her develop one or two more.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Hurley sums up like a consumer guide of all the musical directions Weezer has explored throughout the years.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    They do rest a bit comfortably on what they do right, circumventing the idea of exploring new territory. This is, of course, a curse and a blessing. In presence or not, Azure Ray's stark simplicity will always remain intact.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Carrying features stellar glockenspiel work and a beautiful chorus, but uncharacteristically poor drumming and a gaudy ragtime piano solo. Perhaps the most damning indictment is that the worst songs are all similar enough to blend into each other.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's a fine record on its own terms, but the it's just not possible to circumvent the expectations that come with his dayjob.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While enjoyable and familiar, this set of songs reflects a band who knows what music they don't want to be making but haven't--at least, not yet--determined what it is they want to be defined by instead.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At its best, it blows Chemical Chords out of the water but at its worst, it's uninspiring and dull.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There is a clear aspiration for this album to be ubiquitous, and well, overbearing with tunes. Rather than follow the typical pop formula, Rihanna gives an album specifically catered to where she is now with her career, music, and life. And blaring seems to be the point.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ultimately The Weight's on the Wheels works on the whole. Its finest moments are excellent examples of the wry electro-pop that TRF are certainly proficient at; at its worst, however, the album lacks any evidence of an evolution in sound or style, suffering from mediocrity rather than being distinctly poor.