Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,232 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Illinois
Lowest review score: 10 Songs From Black Mountain
Score distribution:
2,232 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    45:33 is as much gallery-crawl as beach-run; purpose-built in gliding tempos and warm-down synth shimmers for iPod-strapped runners, yet appropriate for a cruise through the Whitney, too. [Review of UK release]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Emerging from California's punk/roots scene, championed by the Blasters and sharing stages with X, he kept it true, while mining the tempest of a formidable rejectionist movement. 3 Pears follows the same map.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    On Cosmogramma, this never-ending stream of aural textures sounds effortless, and the enthralling swirl of jazz, drum 'n' bass, dubstep and hip-hop beckons you toward the edge of something damn near cosmic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    So odd how Koi No Yokan could be both their most traditionally metal and their most melodic record to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Though at time reaching heavenly heights, Shields is, as the name suggests, a heavy, protected album, stuffy with an ennui particular to the young and gifted. It's evidence that Grizzly Bear may be one of the great bands of their generation--if only they'd smile a little more.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A sweeping confession of sanctification, embrace and glory, this is deliverance personified.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What makes the album so amazing is its ability to balance poignancy and fun.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Harps and Angels is another fine Randy Newman album, minimally produced by Mitchell Froom and Lenny Waronker.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Present Tense marks a further refinement and features a band continuing to keep itself restless and uncomfortable.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Here, most gestures remain a bit too consciously panoramic—elegant enough for comfort but often not chancy enough to be breathtaking.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    The Mavericks understand the potency of a band that plays as a solid unit and embellishes that sound accordingly--not quite brazen, but flaring with machismo.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Similar to the BBC’s fantastic Bringing It All Back Home soundtrack, The Beautiful Old further solidifies the root connection between Celtic folk and American bluegrass.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Sonically, this is Fucked Up's cleanest album to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Tell Tale Signs subtly makes a good argument that Dylan’s later work is richer than expected.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lost in the Dream pushes rock music forward.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An eminently pleasurable album that reveals more with each spin. [Apr/May 2005, p.148]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It shouldn’t work--they went all or nothing. They got all.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    It's a linguistic lesson you never asked for, or even wanted, but also one you'll never forget.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Case... still approximates a Northwestern Patsy Cline with a graduate degree, and while the stories she tells are mournful, her delivery remains buoyant. [Apr/May 2006, p.101]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Third is far and away the best, most punk thing in the Portishead catalog: a deeply transgressive album that bears a passing similarity to its predecessors but leaves most of the baggage behind in favor of a full-blown reset.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A masterful sophomore disc on which every weak rhyme, guest and beat has been ironed out through months of hard work and several blown deadlines. [Oct/Nov 2005, p.120]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Suffice to say, then, if you’ve enjoyed the increasingly accessible path The Hold Steady’s taken over the last four years--and, frankly, if you like raising beers, pumping fists and yelling out choice phrases, how could you not?--then you’ll find Stay Positive nearly flawless.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For now, Pecknold and his bandmates are important cogs in the indie-music scene - with a few more albums akin to Helplessness Blues under their belts, they may soon fit just as nicely into the canon of American folk music.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Exhilarating and complex enough to keep you warm year-round. [Aug/Sep 2005, p.108]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    Kozelek’s lack of reservation here is something to be begrudgingly admired, as his willingness to make yet another album that is solely for himself and those obsessive fans who want all the gory details of his past. For the rest of the world, there’s not much here to make any real connection with.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For diehard Elliott Smith fans, New Moon is an absolute must... For remaining listeners, it's merely instructive, sublime in parts but not solid enough or surprising enough or interesting enough, musically, to merit multiple listens. [May 2007, p.58]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a beautiful nightmare with no referent in pop and few in recorded-music history. [Jun/Jul 2006, p.131]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a master wordsmith who believes in simplicity over all, he’s excavated the human heart, calloused pride and faltering dignity with a scalpel. On Picture, it’s all there.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    It’s difficult to imagine another situation in which plinking pixie sounds, recurrent madrigal noises and radiant folk poetry could be categorically described as honking huge, but for all its girth, Have One On Me is packed with magic.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Underneath the orchestral flourishes and children’s choirs, beneath even the frequent textural shifts and melodic detours, are a set of melodies that find new ways to cut straight to the listener every time.