Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,382 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Score distribution:
2,382 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    On songs like these, she resists the temptation to play the spurned frontierswoman out for revenge. She’s a little wounded, a little scared, a little less of a caricature and a little more human.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There’s a sense of purpose and forward motion on this record where old tracks had a feeling of circling in place until the tape eroded.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    St. Vincent reaches, and while she doesn't quite find it throughout, listening to the reach is certainly more interesting than listening to an album that answers just one of the questions again and again and again.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Harrow & The Harvest is simply one of the richest, most expansive roots albums to be released in some time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Though High Violet lacks the front-to-back consistency that made Boxer such an unmitigated revelation, the new album's peaks absolutely rival Boxer's best tracks.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    The lack of universality to much of it keeps it from being the great album it wants to be, and some of the fascination seems to stem from 2013 celebrity culture obsession and speaks to the need to disappear from our own lives and become so wrapped up in the world of the rich and famous.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hawley's empathic delivery reveals the indelible stamp these relationships leave on his protagonists' hearts. [Dec 2005, p.126]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A preciously solemn soundtrack for blustery days. [Dec 2005, p.124]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Even putting aside his berserk, imagination-defying technical skill--he stays deep enough in the pocket to get lost there--there's not a wasted breath on R.A.P. Music.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Only Bejar knows the logic behind his musical metamorphoses, but that doesn't mean we can't enjoy an album as smart and as beguiling as Kaputt.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    It’s all danger and gangsters and loving the ladies when there’s a spare minute. Meanwhile, amidst the hootin’ and hollerin’, the soul will be sated, and saved.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The rural, pure, gospel-meets-banjos-meets-trumpets sound of the record is irrevocably essential Helm, yet the soulful songsmith manages to avoid repetition in his new album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The upside is that they remain a compelling and unpredictable outfit even two decades into their career, but the downside is that What’s Your 20 is more or less redundant. These songs all sound so much better on their respective albums.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Love’s Crushing Diamond never is over-intellectualized, but it lets emotion guide the trajectory, and taking something away from the album is dependent on the listener’s willingness to feel.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Björk weaves into Medúlla a palpable longing for a simpler world--a world predating smart bombs and collapsing towers, a world in which life revolved around the expressive raising of one’s voice, both solitarily and in concert with others.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Second Hand Heart is put together like a great live set.... The album also realizes that rare goal of gaining steam and strength as it carries forward.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The stormy, steely drones and security-camera rhetoric can almost feel like he's compensating for something. But that doesn't stop it from being weirdly charming through its relentless sneer.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    While it’s certainly still working for him now—This Is Happening is, in all respects, LCD’s best album—it doesn’t take much to imagine the act becoming a tired gag a couple more albums down the line.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Treats is just a whole goddamn lot of fun to listen to. It's a supremely raw and visceral pop masterwork, one appropriate to rocking out with headphones on, windows-down bumping on car stereos, four-A.M. warehouse dance parties and countless other summer moments that'll soon have soundtracks courtesy of Sleigh Bells.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A deeply internalized album, it’s The National at their Nationalest. It is, as well, a collection of songs about songs: clever but not meta, and thankfully never cute or self-impressed.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s this friction between the worldly and the cosmic, the erotic and the angry, that gives these songs their unique spark.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Live at Canterbury House, the latest in a series of live recordings from his archives, is pretty simple-left track is voice, right track acoustic guitar. Simplicity, as is evident here, serves him quite well.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    Remnant’s vision is so utterly singular, weird and compelling that you’ll stick around for this mapless journey. God only knows where they’re going, but being lost is most of the fun.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unpredictably unique. [Dec 2005, p.126]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The collection offers a glimpse inside the band’s development, and at times has an air of what might have been even as it reinforces Tweedy’s overall artistic vision.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    It’s a beautiful blast of humanity on an album--a perplexing, fascinating, absorbing album--that often feels outside normal human grasp.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While any given song on the album contains a memorable melodic passage or a compelling idea, some of them are more mixed in their results.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    There is distinct pastoral element at work in the Tallest Man on Earth's songs. He invokes the elements and the myriad forces nature: rivers, islands, rocks, clouds, birds, meadows, rainstorms, hail, forests, weeds, lilies and wheat.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Far from formulaic, Cronin’s sophomore release, MCII, is a nuanced collage of quintessentially “California” pop songs--or, at the very least, how the rest of the country perceives such songs to look and feel.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    One of the more impressive things about Say What You Mean is Weiss’ ability to stretch her songwriting to give each track its own distinct vibe that keeps the album fresh over multiple listens.