Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,546 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 In Utero [20th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,546 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Despite its obviously short shelf-life, Welcome Interstate Managers is delicious power-pop, unpretentious, loose and perfect for teenagers driving down to Ocean City for the weekend.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With its subtly joyous tones and lustrous songwriting, 'Sno Angel Like You turns out to be a labor of love with endless rewards.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It's the headphones album of the year from a producer with a long history who has come into his own.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The live album (recorded in Stockholm in 1994) and disc of rarities and demos put the finished product in context, while the array of EPs show off the wide stylistic range of everything the Breeders could do well.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    This teetering restraint masks the true weirdness of Space Is Only Noise. I could understand someone finding the intensely self-contained Space a bit claustrophobic, but the album is most rewarding when you just grab a seat at the table.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I can attest that the music really does move forward similarly to my own metabolism, gradually building, holding a modest climax in the middle, and ending on a long, fluffy comedown. [Review of UK release]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Despite the cries about careerism, they rarely settled into one spot for long, and even when they were correctly perceived to have done so--about one half of The Great Escape really is a Parklife retread--they were still spreading their collective wings on album tracks and B-sides.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Plenty of good-not-great stuff, and a tad unfocused.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Bakesale add-ons will mostly be of value to those who loved Sebadoh's first few years of all-over-the-place wildness, but it's not as if their second-disc inclusion can dull the parent album's punch.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    jj's full-length debut is as easy to enjoy as whatever the last CD was you brought home with a giant cannabis leaf on the cover. They're as naive as they are cynical-- or is it the other stupid way around?-- and they manage to be pretty, touching, funny, and motivating, in different ways, in all the right places, for nine songs lasting 28 minutes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Black Sheep Boy creates a roomy and natural showcase for Sheff's high-wire vocals, and as a result, it may be the band's best album.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    A record of achingly gorgeous dance-pop that captures both the joy of nostalgia and the melancholic sense that we're grasping for good times increasingly out of reach.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Cosmogramma is an intricate, challenging record that fuses his loves-- jazz, hip-hop, videogame sounds, IDM-- into something unique. It's an album in the truest sense.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While there's no question that Grizzly Bear's last two records have sounded gorgeous, critics of the band have wondered if that's enough. Shields, the band's fourth and most compositionally adventurous record, should put those concerns to bed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Ram is a domestic-bliss album, one of the weirdest, earthiest, and most honest ever made.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Calexico have created their first genuinely masterful full-length, crammed with immediate songcraft, shifting moods and open-ended exploration.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Nothing to Fear might be the surprise highlight of this collection, even accounting for all the classic stuff on the first disc.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The Futureheads rely on actual chops and the kind of melodic astuteness usually associated with piano-pop balladeers, and in doing so, they exhibit complete control over their music and intertwining vocal deliveries.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    No one aspect of Ali's personality really dominates. The Truth Is Here is all the stronger for it, and that can only be considered a good sign.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    The music on Authenticity may initially sound remedial and elemental, even saccharine, but further listens reveal new intricacies.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    This is an album whose every layer seems customized, whose every crease seems deliberate. That calculation doesn’t seem to have mitigated Indian’s power at all. Rather, this is the strongest they’ve ever sounded and the smartest they’ve ever sounded.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This album still stands out among his recent work, not so much for the leap of faith he took collaborating with Auerbach but because it turned out so damn well.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    One of the most impressive aspects of The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place is that it feels constantly in flux, growing and transforming with every note.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Earle's music doesn't simply mirror the transcendence of its creator; it lends transcendence to the listener as well, as all excellent music will. But what truly makes this one of Earle's best records is that he refuses to be pulled down by musical decisions. It's as if he never faced a problem of whether or not to add this or that instrument, or to veer off in this or that direction. He simply had the idea and went with it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Amidon and his cabal of collaborators-- Nico Muhly, Ben Frost, Shahzad Ismaily-- have been merging chamber music with indie rock for awhile now (see also: Sufjan Stevens, Thomas Bartlett, Owen Pallett, Bryce and Aaron Dessner of the National), and their touch is nuanced and, on occasion, delightfully odd.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Diotima's glory is often in its details. It has fewer stops, starts, and redirections than its predecessors. Rather, the big shifts are now often misleadingly subtle and slight, created more by the way the musicians move against and with each other than how the band moves as a unit.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Bigger, stranger, and just plain heavier than any Circles disc before it, the first 35 minutes of Empros' empyrean, oblong alien-prog finds the band once again wrestling their grand ambitions into impossible shapes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    On Man With Potential Pete Swanson's ability to encompass many sounds and moods knows few bounds, if any.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The Regal Years does a thorough job of not just compiling the Beta Band's recorded legacy, but underscoring the real reason why they're missed--it’s not just for the music they left behind, but for the infinite possibilities within it that had yet to be explored.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Lucky for us, there’s no one else like them and on Present Tense, their success has allowed Wild Beasts to be even more like themselves.