Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,232 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Histoire de Melody Nelson
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,232 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    A record of achingly gorgeous dance-pop that captures both the joy of nostalgia and the melancholic sense that we're grasping for good times increasingly out of reach.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Cosmogramma is an intricate, challenging record that fuses his loves-- jazz, hip-hop, videogame sounds, IDM-- into something unique. It's an album in the truest sense.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While there's no question that Grizzly Bear's last two records have sounded gorgeous, critics of the band have wondered if that's enough. Shields, the band's fourth and most compositionally adventurous record, should put those concerns to bed.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Ram is a domestic-bliss album, one of the weirdest, earthiest, and most honest ever made.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Calexico have created their first genuinely masterful full-length, crammed with immediate songcraft, shifting moods and open-ended exploration.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Nothing to Fear might be the surprise highlight of this collection, even accounting for all the classic stuff on the first disc.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The Futureheads rely on actual chops and the kind of melodic astuteness usually associated with piano-pop balladeers, and in doing so, they exhibit complete control over their music and intertwining vocal deliveries.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    No one aspect of Ali's personality really dominates. The Truth Is Here is all the stronger for it, and that can only be considered a good sign.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    The music on Authenticity may initially sound remedial and elemental, even saccharine, but further listens reveal new intricacies.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    This is an album whose every layer seems customized, whose every crease seems deliberate. That calculation doesn’t seem to have mitigated Indian’s power at all. Rather, this is the strongest they’ve ever sounded and the smartest they’ve ever sounded.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    This album still stands out among his recent work, not so much for the leap of faith he took collaborating with Auerbach but because it turned out so damn well.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    One of the most impressive aspects of The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place is that it feels constantly in flux, growing and transforming with every note.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Earle's music doesn't simply mirror the transcendence of its creator; it lends transcendence to the listener as well, as all excellent music will. But what truly makes this one of Earle's best records is that he refuses to be pulled down by musical decisions. It's as if he never faced a problem of whether or not to add this or that instrument, or to veer off in this or that direction. He simply had the idea and went with it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Amidon and his cabal of collaborators-- Nico Muhly, Ben Frost, Shahzad Ismaily-- have been merging chamber music with indie rock for awhile now (see also: Sufjan Stevens, Thomas Bartlett, Owen Pallett, Bryce and Aaron Dessner of the National), and their touch is nuanced and, on occasion, delightfully odd.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    Diotima's glory is often in its details. It has fewer stops, starts, and redirections than its predecessors. Rather, the big shifts are now often misleadingly subtle and slight, created more by the way the musicians move against and with each other than how the band moves as a unit.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Bigger, stranger, and just plain heavier than any Circles disc before it, the first 35 minutes of Empros' empyrean, oblong alien-prog finds the band once again wrestling their grand ambitions into impossible shapes.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    On Man With Potential Pete Swanson's ability to encompass many sounds and moods knows few bounds, if any.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The Regal Years does a thorough job of not just compiling the Beta Band's recorded legacy, but underscoring the real reason why they're missed--it’s not just for the music they left behind, but for the infinite possibilities within it that had yet to be explored.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Lucky for us, there’s no one else like them and on Present Tense, their success has allowed Wild Beasts to be even more like themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Like those on their last album, these songs reveal themselves gradually but surely, building to the inevitable moment when they hit you in the gut. It's the rare album that gives back whatever you put into it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    If it doesn’t quite show the knack for experimentation and variety hinted at via Inspiration, Wings is a quietly amazing document of Otis’ doggged determination over the quarter century between leaving the business and the first Inspiration reissue.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    White Blood Cells doesn't veer far from the formula of past White Stripes records; all are tense, sparse and jagged. But it's here that they've finally come into their own, where Jack and Meg White finally seem not only comfortable with the path they've chosen, but practiced, precise and able to convey the deepest sentiment in a single bound.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    That idea, the notion of music as a cheapened, battered object, touches nearly every aspect of Ravedeath, 1972, a dark and often claustrophobic record that is arguably Hecker's finest work to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    All Hands on the Bad One finds the Northwest power-trio at their most melodious, playful, sarcastic, and punchy-- both musically and lyrically.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Yes, it sounds quite a bit like The Books' debut, but it also sounds like nobody else. The Books remain more or less a genre of one.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    A strong experimental record that draws on Cee-Lo's malleable style of rap... one of the year's strongest hip-hop albums to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The structure is as expansive and freewheeling as any strange trip.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    David Comes to Life is absolutely worth the commitment, a convincing demonstration of what can happen when a band works without limitations.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Gojira's best work to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 77 Critic Score
    Modern Jester is Dilloway's War and Peace. It covers practically all of his sonic obsessions, stretching them to lengths at which he can explore every detail and tangent. The result-- seven pieces encompassing four sides of vinyl-- feels like a major statement, even if it's made of wordless, sometimes harsh noise.