PopMatters' Scores

  • TV
  • Music
For 7,635 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Doolittle 25
Lowest review score: 0 Travistan
Score distribution:
7,635 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Waits has given us another brilliant album in Bad as Me, his best in a long while (maybe since 1992's Bone Machine), but he also lays down a gauntlet.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Put simply, Accelerando is an album filled with highlights.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There’s a sense of purpose here, of direction and clarity, shafts of accessibility that relegate the din to the background without ever compromising the potentially hostile underbelly of the band’s core sound.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sometimes I Sit is not just tighter and more cohesive as it should be, but it’s a more confidently proficient work as well.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It may sound strange and unwieldy on first (or second or third) exposure, but those who stick with it will be rewarded with an album of surpassing intricacy, filled with an abundance of musical nooks and crannies, the likes of which reward sustained attention and concentrated effort on the part of the listener.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Some of the most euphoric, mind-blowingly beautiful music we have heard in years.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although Bomb the Music Industry! may not have laid waste to the music business with this record, they have made an incredibly enjoyable listen that is clearly a product of talented musicians who love their craft.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Complete doesn't break any new ground, but it does allow you to have one of the most influential bands in all of rock music rounded up in one place.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Musgrave just paints a picture of their shared solitude, and she lets us see our absurd selves in the lives of others.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Both of these compilations [A Collection and 1992-2012: The Anthology] offer an embarrassment of riches, and in very different ways excellent overviews of one of the few long-running, still productive techno bands out there.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The scary thing about Marc Ribot and his new(ish) band is that all of these styles and quirks are pulled off so convincingly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bejars songs have, in the past, sometimes seemed like vehicles for his lyrics, yet with Destroyer’s Rubies he seems to have made peace with the musical element of his work as well.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a core of strength running through this darkly unobtrusive music which lends it a coherence of vision, drawing as it does on place and character as it roams the less fashionable byways of an older America, hitching the frayed strands of the past to the lurching wagon of the present.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite its various faults, undun is righteously solid.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The 16 songs that appear on Rejoicing in the Hands, are so striking in their sound and so original, that no producer could've have imagined them. If anything, they affirm Devendra Banhart as one of the most unique musical talents to emerge in quite some time.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The best album of Björk's career
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Review #1: <A HREF="http://popmatters.com/music/reviews/s/smithelliott-fromabasement.shtml" TARGET="_blank">A decisive triumph, and probably a personal best for Smith</A> [score=90]; Review #2: <A HREF="http://popmatters.com/music/reviews/s/smithelliott-fromabasement2.shtml" TARGET="_blank">May be Smith's finest.</A> [score=90]
    • PopMatters
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While The Blueprint falls short of his debut's brilliance, it is easily the best Jay Z recording since that release.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album proves itself to be what we all thought Radiohead couldn’t make again: a masterpiece.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A record that sounds as if it would be very much at home on any AOR radio station in the 1970s.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is fresh, original, and points the way.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Meticulously choppy and frequently free of inherent genre boundaries, it's an askew masterpiece of brains, brawn, heart, and soul.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It imparts that expansive happiness of catchy songs just at the margins of your memory, not quite in your grasp, a reminder of the pleasure of music, something beyond yourself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With nearly three dozen guest musicians chipping in, the aptly titled Monoliths and Dimensions is far and away the band’s most ambitious project to date, but typically, the many guest contributions are so subtly performed and arranged, not to mention entirely in keeping with O’Malley’s and Anderson’s collective vision, that we hardly notice.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's sad for Ford's memory, but lucky for us: Harlan County remains a solitary delight, away and apart, to itself.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The musicians on this compilation are a testament to the creativity, dynamism and exuberance of the Haitian people.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If there are any faults on Foundations of Burden, it’s that the middle portion of the album tends to succumb to a sameness sound, which is almost inevitable when you have two 10-minute plus tracks back to back. Fortunately, the demand for subsequent listens is hardly a laborious task, given Brett Campbell’s stellar, sustained vocal delivery.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The new album doesn’t have the political commentary that we saw on those two [Childish Things (2005) and Just Us Kids (2008)], but it’s likely we’re going to see Complicated Game on the nominee list come next year. It’s that good.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All We Love We Leave Behind is proof positive that the incandescent flame of Converge's fury is fully under their direct control, and because of this ability to harness their elemental power, the Converge of 2012 sound just as fearless and peerless as ever.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Black Tambourine is indispensable listening for anyone with even a passing interest in indie pop's past or current renaissance and a wholly welcome reminder of the unwavering greatness of one of the genre's truly seminal bands.