Revolver's Scores

  • Music
For 191 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Relentless, Reckless Forever
Lowest review score: 30 Cattle Callin
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 191
191 music reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Stankonia lays bare the group's desire to be something greater than just rap stars. No two tracks sound alike, and they've taken time in the woodshed to pen rhymes that are even more dexterous and honest than their past work--no mean feat. [#3, p.107]
    • Revolver
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Unto the Locust isn't just a great album, it's an important statement that metal doesn't have to fall into trite categories or draw from pre-existing formulas to be accessible.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Post-hardcore group Thursday's latest, No Devolución, is a grand experience, full of depth and atmospheric subtleties that show off a new side to the group.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These five tracks bridge the gap between pop punk and melodic hardcore in a way that’s so infectious that you’ll be too busy singing along to notice.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Probably the best indie drone rock since Galaxie 500 put the Velvets jangle to hypnotic use (although Low reach even greater peaks of elegant sublimity). [#4, p.106]
    • Revolver
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Is Survived By isn’t all pit-fodder; the cinematic-sounding “Non Fiction” showcases a mastery of dynamics that’s equally as impressive as the heavy stuff.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s all the necessary B-adjectives–bludgeoning, brutal, burly--but it’s something else too; Bloodcurdling.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kylesa nods toward their feral past as choruses make muscular concessions to hardcore floor-punches. But other tracks are their artiest and dreamiest yet. [Nov/Dec 2010, p.96]
    • Revolver
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The record is exactly as advertised, despite three new members entering the lineup. Wrong has rarely sounded so right.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is music at a slow simmer, not a fast boil, and as such, takes time and patience to absorb. But the passion and intensity is undeniable.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    TesseracT’s real strength is that they focus on the whole instead of getting bogged down with the intricacy of the parts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Migration seems to wander a bit more than 2011’s focused and phenomenal The Collective, losing some steam by the last few tracks.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If bong-rattling stoner doom is your cup of flayed meat, you won’t want to miss this demonic feast.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a real sense of hip-hop culture in the lyrics, and there's a sophistication in the way that the rap is made rock here-in other words, this isn't just whiney frat-boy rhymes slapped on top of generic, down-tuned riffs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s weird, it’s creepy, it’s unstable, but man, there’s art here, something that few bands can boast.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rather than play into expectations and write 12 15-minute songs about H.P. Lovecraft or the Dead Sea Scrolls, Atlanta's finest created a more-than-decent metal record.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their third album takes the stylized blur of their previous LPs, and somehow finds new room for Circle Jerskian hooks, mid-tempo suckerpunches, and one Neurotic sludge workout. p[Jul/Aug 2010, p.90]
    • Revolver
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Packed with epic melodies, searing solos, and medieval horror imagery, Forever Abomination totally rocks, aided by (finally for these guys!) a perfect production sound.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On their fourth full-length and first on their own label, jazz-spazz-metal epileptics the Dillinger Escape Plan re-embrace the all-killer, no-filler attitude that made their earlier albums and EPs so simultaneously exhausting and exhilarating. [Mar/Apr 2010, p.88]
    • Revolver
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dark Roots offers shred-heavy political statements ("True American Hate"), hook-laden power-jags ("Native Blood"), and straight-up rippers ("Man Kills Mankind"), slipping only on slower material like the title track and quasi-ballad "Cold Embrace."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The repetition of downtuned breakdowns will probably tire even deathcore superfans by album’s end. Solid–but this Witch could use a few new tricks.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Josh Homme and fellow Queens Troy Van Leeuwen, Dean Fertita, and Michael Shuman have gotten back on beam for the band’s first album in six years, apparently rediscovering the joys of creating robotic, riff-oriented hard-rock songs.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times, this straightforward approach, along with a smoother production sound, strips the Massachusetts quartet of the nuanced breakdowns and guitar leads that made their previous material so captivating.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The heshers who crave this Viking death-march death-metal will have it, and those who aren't inspired by what they stream on the internet won't. Even with a lesser work, Amon Amarth have done their job.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Malkmus remains up to his usual trickery, packing the proceedings with musical plot twists like false starts, abrupt fades, and fake codas. [#4, p.106]
    • Revolver
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They sound utterly repellant, and it suits them perfectly.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Folks like to hate on the BDM, labeling them part of the problem because they use neon colors on their T-shirts, but death-metal fans who want something different and exciting need look no further.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result: a crushing musical experience easily among the year's best extreme-metal records.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At Night We Live represents an older, slightly sleazier, but still poetically earnest far. [May/Jun 2010, p.98]
    • Revolver
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band’s primary objective is to lift listeners off their feet and keep them floating, with only occasional handholds for stability.