Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,456 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 None Shall Pass
Lowest review score: 0 We Must Become the Pitiless Censors of Ourselves
Score distribution:
2456 music reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With At Mount Zoomer, Wolf Parade has quite easily surpassed the greatness that was their debut, and have very quietly made one of the better albums of 2008.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rarely does an album consider life's eternal struggles in quite this way: searching for answers with its eyes wide open, and silly string in its hair.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One outright dud of a song and a handful of lazily written lines don't outweigh all that Chambers and Nicholson get right on Wreck & Ruin, an album that tempers its genuine, heartfelt romance with the darkest comedy.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Swanlights reveals a portrait of the artist looking upward and onward beyond anguish.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It makes for a fascinating addition to the already-extensive OPN catalogue.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Perhaps what's most encouraging about You Get What You Give, though, is that Zac Brown Band hasn't played it safe. Instead, they've played fast and loose with a set of influences that owe far less to country music than to Southern rock, jam bands, and reggae.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Frightened Rabbit has always relied quite heavily on its members' charm, and for the most part, Mixed Drinks preserves that beautifully.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sex Change, like some of the best pieces by the Boredoms or Glenn Branca or Eno, is a startlingly fun album to listen to.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As the album proceeds, Morrissey simply sounds like a superior version of the singer he's always been.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Blessed with a strange, ethereal voice, he could easily excel at music that matches its dulcet tones, but the pungent mixtures of high and low he concocts end up being far more thrilling.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All three of those bands masterfully juggle creative lyrics with equally inventive music, something Cymbals Eat Guitars comes very close to achieving on Lenses Alien.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tough Love is an album that reveals itself gradually, reducing this ever-beguiling artist down to her essence, while offering ample opportunity for her to develop her technique.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Burn Your Fire for No Witness is noisier, brasher, and more confident than its languid predecessor.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Exai represents a career-spanning work, one that encapsulates almost every phase of their evolving aesthetic, and whether you're a fan of their early work or their recent output, it stands as a remarkable synthesis that coheres only through the deftness of its sonic architects.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As Will Gregory's superimposed sonic backgrounds flit by like the green-screen projections of some fickle, seemingly opportunist sci-fi magician, singer and namesake Alison Goldfrapp's voice--ethereal, otherworldly, but always human--remains a constant variable, the cord that connects all of Goldfrapp's disparate, but equally captivating, incarnations.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Establishes her as the progenitor of what could be called electro-ethno-pop.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even when they occasionally stumble ever so slightly under the weight of their own ambition, the reckless, adventuring spirit that comprises Dance Mother is one of the compelling things that makes it sound like one of the more exciting debut albums to emerge in long while.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The basic mastery of these songs, the way they skip between styles and voices, while maintaining a strict level of lyrical and vocal quality, is a great accomplishment in itself, especially on a debut.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is, in other words, a rejection of progression and passage for mood and form. Peyroux mastered such silken aura long ago, and while that may make the album somewhat of a retread, it's a playful one nonetheless.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the myriad references [Sade, Aaliyah]... it's clear Ware has found a voice of her own on Devotion.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Grossi's ability to deftly assimilate these more pop-oriented artists into his oeuvre is a testament to his growth since You Are All I See, resulting in his most confident release to date.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chambers just gets structure, and it's that know-how that makes Little Bird one of her finest albums.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Goldsworthy has built a stratum of battered, creaky atmosphere atop Gardens & Villa's already richly layered mood.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In their current form, Bear in Heaven may indeed be far more accessible than they were in the mid to late aughts when a song sporting a verse/chorus framework was the exception rather than the rule (even now it's more of a suggestion). Nevertheless, a brazen and workmanlike confidence marks the album as a more recognizable creative evolution than its predecessor's endearing, but ultimately canned, artistic departure.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At his most direct, he fully holds his own against the likes of [Ryan] Adams or Ron Sexsmith, and for his compositional skill, Idols Of Exile is perhaps a more consistent album than either of those two has released.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mann's best work has always lingered on such private reverie, and Mental Illness is one of her most ravishing and affecting hymns to solitude.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Agnostic Hymns impresses just as much for its tunefulness and Snider and producer Eric McConnell's unconventional choices as for its arch point of view.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LP1
    LP1 is more than just a confident debut album. It's primordial in a way that Björk herself has often attempted but frequently short-circuited letting her cognizance get in the way.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A raucous self-celebration, full of scrappy beat poetry leavened with dark-edged Americana influences, Nelson Algren-style urban malaise, and off-kilter, strangely instrumentalized songs.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Occasionally, the more ambitious nature of Everything Is 4 reveals some of Derulo's weaknesses, like his insistence on indulging straight R&B (which feels basic compared to the unique mode of genre-bending he usually works in), but stretching musically also leads to arguably the most exciting moment here, the funk rave-up of album-closer "X2CU."