The Guardian's Scores

For 4,375 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Dreams and Daggers
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
4375 music reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Surprises don't abound.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It doesn't sound like a masterpiece; then again, it does nothing to damage its maker's reputation, which is more than you can say for Doherty's post-Libertines efforts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The format can run the risk of feeling one-dimensional, and the repetitive Mind Blues is more jarring than thrilling, but The Offbeat and Everything All the Time are giant, funky, instantly catchy collisions of voice and rhythm that will no doubt gain even more physical heft when they play them live.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    An enjoyable if occasionally familiar-sounding second album from this New York trio continues their open-armed embrace of the woozy melodies and prettified feedback of early-90s shoegaze indie while upping their game somewhat in terms of polish and accessibility.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ultimately, this lack of direction means the album doesn’t take off. Even amid the mish-mash, however, there are enough moments of quality to remind the listener why this MC deserves to finish his career on his own terms.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At their best - on songs such as the wailing and quirky Seeing Hands and Mr Orange, or the pounding finale One Thousand Tears of a Tarantula - they play an intriguing mixture of psychedelic rock and garage surf styles, mixed in with Nimol's cool, clear vocals in Khmer.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Cut and Paste’s melodies are glorious--single Daffodil Days is surging and swoonsome--but with lyrics so surface, you sometimes wish he’d get out a bit more.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A sense of stylistic familiarity does rather rule out any real "wow" factor, but its simple charms sink in over repeated listens, and firm fans of this whole backwoods-troubadour thing should find plenty to admire here.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s polite punk: impossible to feel either alarmed or electrified by, but an appealingly ghostly listen nonetheless.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She's somewhere beneath some half-hearted songs, a confused concept and someone else's image.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At their best, their songs transcend lyrical cliches such as "There's a line between love and hate", and Locked in the Basement and The Runner are undeniably haunting, even though there's nothing to particularly distinguish the band from their better-known peers.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    FlyLo's albums tend to be slight, and this is no exception: these tracks feel less like fully fleshed-out compositions than lightly drawn sketches started, but not always finished, from a spontaneous jam session.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The formula of cramming 30 different songs into one is fun for a while, and it's invigorating, but ultimately it's hard to shake a sense of over-indulgence.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Linden's songs are structurally simple yet too busy, layered with rolling, bending, juddering, chiming, spiralling, crackling electronic noise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    After the Disco has some memorable hooks, but it doesn't quite lift this work beyond a studied genre piece.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It feels like a series of tracks rather than a fully realised long-player.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the added value of the remixes and the quality of the original tracks, The Apple and the Tooth remains a complementary piece - albeit one that's a compliment to Bibio's craft, too.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Klaxons' ambition to stand apart from the grey indie hordes, to race by in a blur of outlandish rhetoric and pupil-dilating intensity, is admirable, but there are too many road bumps on this particular trip.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    songs, like I'm Hungry, are laudably silly, others simply bland, but with a little help from Ozzy Osbourne and Slash, who adds glitzy embellishments to the heavy, anthemic Vengeance Is Mine, Cooper's back on par.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Even at its most jagged, however, Gimme Some comes across as power-pop by numbers, the effortlessness with which the Swedish trio spin cheerful melodies and ineffable hooks making almost every song sound uncomfortably derivative.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Listened to loud, these songs drift warmly away on the air, but up close, Stables’ voice burrows into the ears, sounding direct and sweet, like a dear old friend you’re reconnecting with, or a more grounded Cat Power.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are a couple of indifferent songs, and the musical arrangements behind those amazing voices are sometimes a little underwhelming – but amazing they remain.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A debut that, frustratingly, juggles promise and excess.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Olympia is only the Roxy Music singer's second set of new material since 1994. However, he's busily assembled an all-star supporting cast – guitarists Nile Rodgers, Jonny Greenwood and Dave Gilmour, Mani and Flea on bass, and most of Roxy, including Brian Eno.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If only Michaelson's lyrics could match theirs for social insight, devastating romanticism or sharp wit. Nonetheless, this second album gleams with promise.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A succession of producers--including Ariel Rechtshaid, Patrick Carney of the Black Keys and Jesso’s chief collaborator, former Girls bassist Chet “JR” White--have smoothed the fragility and murk of Jesso’s demos into a 70s-inspired production that accentuates the similarities between his songs and those of various vintage songwriters.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Pains of Being Pure at Heart opt to adapt, drafting in producer Flood and mixer Alan Moulder to polish and shine their second album.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If this had been released a year after their last album, Trompe Le Monde, it would have fit perfectly adequately into Pixies' discography.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    What it lacks in linguistic poetry is amply compensated for in the vibrancy of Seasick's guitar-playing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The unvarying mood can get a little tiring.