The Guardian's Scores

  • Music
For 3,103 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Places of Worship
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
3,103 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Secret Wars is a sobering demonstration of what repetition can do in the wrong hands, as the Brooklyn trio funnel the most endurance-testing excesses of Suicide, Can, Sonic Youth and stoner rock into a joyless, oppressive piece of work.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Syrupy, multi-tracked vocals akin to Supertramp in a particularly foul mood have replaced the primal roar of old, while their tectonic hugeness has been supplanted by the wearisome over-indulgence of musos at play.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    It never sounds like much more than a bar band playing songs for friends.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Former child actor Aubrey Graham's much-vaunted sensitivity and introspection is more hollow than ever on his second album.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Feels Like Home is so inoffensive you have trouble remembering whether you put it on.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Their website trumpets the "pure musical possibilities" of Electric Arguments, but this is heavily laboured hackwork.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The songs descend the same chords repeatedly and ponderously, as if the band were falling down the same flight of stairs over and over again.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A crashing disappointment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Every single note feels forced, in hock to a sound and a set of attitudes that date from a time before many of us were born.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Some half-decent anthems and a sweet little love song are shifted further towards the bin by Kyle Falconer's singing, which sounds as though he has forgotten to put his teeth in. By the end of it, you may need a long bath.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Perhaps spurred by the ease with which the Boring Solo has been grafted on to their chosen template, When It Falls finds Zero 7 expanding their horizons and going on to be boring in other areas.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The beats are intricate but ineffectual, the songwriting is thin and every song is enveloped in a suffocating orchestral shroud.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    With nothing musically fresh, attention is focused on [50] himself. Bad idea.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Throughout Rock N Roll, Adams is too busy winking, smirking and showing off to convey anything approaching an emotion.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The "songs" (a relative concept on planet Mars Volta) sound as though they are competing to unleash as many prog-rock cliches as possible: portentous guitar riffs and twiddly bits are interspersed with all manner of atonal wind instruments and sonic pomposities.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Gershwin and Wilson are among the 20th century's greatest writers of popular music; no one wishing to learn more about either should start here.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The music is so anodyne that you don't pay much attention to Lavigne's lyrics. This proves to be a small mercy: examination of the CD booklet reveals that prolonged exposure to her words could leave a previously healthy adult rocking backwards and forwards in a foetal ball.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    What 20/20 does best is portentousness and the empty brag - essentially male traits that make listening rather like being hectored by the pub bore.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's all too dull to make anyone care but Crow.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Disembodied bleeps and European synth drifts opt for bleak, alien magnetism but just end up sounding utterly depressing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The only risk Marley takes is on You're My Yoko, where he attempts to woo a lucky lady by likening her to the avant-garde artist, while casting himself as John Lennon. Julian Lennon would have been nearer the mark.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Hackneyed songs grind drearily.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Half the 12 tracks are risible throwaway genre and covers. The other half are, at best, extremely mellifluous Big Star tribute band songs.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    While their first album had a stirring anthem or two, their songwriting here is both flimsy and overblown, like an empty carrier bag temporarily inflated by a gust of wind.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Disc one sounds like the band's Desperado years left out in the rain--damp, shrunken and fetid, with songs such as Guilty of the Crime and Fast Company giving out as much spark as a dying novelty lighter.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The Courteeners sound like troglodytes on the rampage.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Every now and again they hit on a promising musical idea, then ruin it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    I Created Disco is witless and forever tripping over its own feet.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The Marilyn Manson blueprint holds fast, and all the familiar elements are here. The difference is that even Manson sounds unconvinced by his "antichrist superstar" persona; maybe because his target demographic have grown up and moved on.